(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalog"

HARVARD SCHOOL 
OF PUBLIC HEALTH 




OFFICIAL REGISTER OF 
HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

1982-1983 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/catalog1982harv 



smktrm », mm msm 
$77 mmmmm mmt 



Table of Contents 



Calendar 

A Note from the Dean 
Administration 
Degree Requirements 

9 Master of Public Health 

12 Doctor of Public Health 

13 Master of Occupational Health 

14 Master of Science 
Doctor of Science 

19 Residency 

1 L > Postdoctoral Fellowship Program 
in Dental Public Health and 
Dental Care Administration 

Departments and Programs 

21 Behavioral Sciences 

23 Biostatistics 

26 Environmental Health Sciences 

30 Epidemiology 

33 Health Policy and Management 

40 Maternal and Child Health and Aging 

43 Microbiology 

45 Nutrition 

48 Physiology 

52 Population Sciences 

54 Sanitary Engineering 

55 Tropical Public Health 

Centers, Offices, and Special Programs 

59 Center for the Analysis of Health Practices 

60 Center for Population Studies 

60 Center for the Prevention of Infectious Diseases 

61 The Kresge Center for Environmental Health 

62 Educational Resource Center for 
Occupational Safety and Health 

63 Office of Continuing Education 

64 Office of Health Policy Information 

65 Office of International Health Programs 

66 The Community Health Improvement Program 
66 Interdisciplinary Programs in Health 



69 General Information 

69 History of the School 

69 Location and Resources 

70 Computer Facility 
70 Libraries 

72 Admission 

73 Foreign Students 

74 Degree Candidates 

75 Nondegree Status 
76 Registration 

76 General Information 
80 The Grading System 

83 Financial Information 

83 Tuition and Fee Schedule 

84 Payment of Fees 

85 Registration and Tuition Guidelines 
88 Living Expenses 

88 Housing 

89 Student Health Service 

89 Loans and Fellowships 

90 Scholarships 

91 Office of Student Affairs 

92 Protection of Rights and Privacy of Students 

93 Disciplinary Procedures for Students 

94 Grievance Procedures for Students 
96 Alumni Association 

97 Courses of Instruction 

97 Continuing Education 

97 Interdepartmental 

99 Behavioral Sciences 

100 Biostatistics 

103 Environmental Health Interdepartmental 

104 Environmental Health Sciences 
107 Epidemiology 

109 Health Policy and Management 

114 Maternal and Child Health and Aging 

116 Microbiology 

118 Nutrition 

119 Physiology 

120 Population Sciences 

123 Sanitary Engineering 

124 Tropical Public Health 

127 Officers of Instruction and Research 

127 Faculty 

132 Teaching Staff 

135 Research Staff 

136 Professors Emeriti 



Volume 4, Number 4 
August 10, 1982 

Official Register of Harvard University 

The Official Register of Harvard University 
(ISSN #0199-1787) is published twelve 
times a year, twice in July, four times in 
August, three times in September, once 
in October, once in February, and once 
in March. The Official Register of Harvard 
University is published by the Office of 
the University Publisher, 7 Ware Street, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138. Sec- 
ond class postage paid at Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
Official Register of Harvard University , 
Harvard School of Public Health, Admis- 
sions Office, 677 Huntington Avenue, 
Boston, Massachusetts 02115. Requests 
for additional copies should be made di- 
rectly to the Harvard School of Public 
Health at this address. 

Every effort is made to insure the in- 
formation contained in this Register is ac- 
curate at the time of publication. How- 
ever, the School of Public Health reserves 
the right to make changes without notice 
in tuition and fees, admission and degree 
requirements, courses of instruction, and 
any other information contained herein. 

As a matter of policy, Harvard Univer- 
sity does not discriminate among applic- 
ants and students in admissions, educa- 
tional policies, scholarship and loan pro- 
grams, and athletic and other programs 
on the basis of race, religion, sex, na- 
tional origin, color, creed, handicap, age, 
sexual orientation, marital or parental 
status, or status as a Vietnam era or dis- 
abled veteran. 



Academic Calendar, 1982-83 



Fall Term 

September 13, Monday 

Orientation and registration for new inter- 
national students: 10:30 A.M., Interna- 
tional House, 203 Park Drive. 
September 14, Tuesday 
Registration for new U.S. students: 
G-Level, Kresge Building, 12:00-2:00 P.M., 
according to first letter of last name: 



A 


• E 


12:00 Noon 


F- 


K 


12:30 P.M. 


L- 


R 


1:00 P.M 


S- 


Z 


1:30 P.M. 



Opening Session for all new students: 
2:00-4:00 P.M., G-l auditorium, Kresge 
Building. 

All new students are required to attend the 
opening session and to be present for the 
registration period. 
September 15, Wednesday 
Registration for all returning students: 
G-Level, Kresge Building, 9:00 A.M. -1:00 
P.M. according to first letter of last name: 
A-E 9:00 A.M. 
F-K 10:00 A.M. 
L-R 11:00A.M. 
S - Z 12:00 Noon 

Students who fail to register on the ap- 
pointed dates will have a $20 late fee as- 
sessed on their fall term bills. The period 
between the opening sessions and Sep- 
tember 20 will be devoted to orientation 
lectures, individual conferences with fac- 
ulty members, and selection of courses of 
study. 

September 20, Monday 

First period "a" and "ab" courses begin. 



September 29, Wednesday 

Study cards for all returning students due 
by 3:00 P.M. in Registrar's Office. Students 
who hand in late study cards will be 
charged a $15 fee. Once a study card is 
filed, all changes must be made on drop/ 
add petitions. A $10 fee is charged for each 
petition submitted. Students are allowed 
one free petition during the "b" and "d" 
periods. 

October 4, Monday 

Study cards for all new students due in 
Registrar's Office by 3:00 P.M. Students 
who hand in late study cards will be 
charged a $15 fee. Once a study card is 
filed, all changes must be made on drop/ 
add petitions. A $10 fee is charged for each 
petition submitted. Students are allowed 
one free petition during the "b" and "d" 
periods. 

Last day to drop add and change grading 
options for "a" and "ab" period courses. 
Last day to cross-register at HSPH for "a" 
and "ab" courses. 

Last day to register for the fall term at 
HSPH. Last day to cancel registration with 
refund of term bill payment. 
October 11, Monday 
Columbus Day, a holiday- 
October 27, Wednesday 
Bound, signed theses due by 3:00 P.M. in 
the Registrar's Office for doctoral students 
applying for November degrees. 
November 11, Thursday 
Veterans' Day, a holiday. 



November 12, Friday 

First period ends. 
November 15, Monday 

Second period "b" courses begin. 
Students are allowed one drop/add petition 
for "b" and "be" courses without charge. 
November 24, Wednesday 
Thanksgiving recess begins at 5:30 P.M. 
November 29, Monday 
Thanksgiving recess ends at 8:00 A.M. 
Deadline for filing degree applications for 
degree in March 1983. 
Deadline for applications for Nonresident 
doctoral status for spring term. 
Last day to drop/add and change grading 
options for "b" and "be" period courses by 
3:00 P.M. 

Last day to cross-register for "b" and "be" 

courses by 3:00 P.M. 

December 17, Friday 

Winter recess begins at 5:30 P.M. 

January 10, Monday 

Winter recess ends at 8:00 A.M. 

January 10, Monday 

Spring study card materials available in 

Registrar's Office for continuing students. 

Note: Students registered through the year 

will not be allowed to file study cards for 

the spring term until all fall tuition and at 

least one-quarter of the spring tuition has 

been paid. 

Last day to add "e" period courses. 



Degree Calendar 



For a degree to be Degree applications are Bound theses are due by 

awarded: due in Registrar's Office 3:00 P.M. in the Registrar's 

on Monday: Office on Wednesday: 



November 15, 1982 
March 21, 1983 
June 8, 1983 



August 16, 1982 
November 29, 1982 
April 4, 1983 



October 27, 1982 
February 16, 1983 
June 1, 1983 



January 21, Friday 

Second period courses end. 
Deadline for completing prev ious spring 
term courses graded as Incomplete. 
Semester break recess begins at 5:30 P.M. 
January 24 through January 28 
Monday through Friday 
Supervised special studies or field observa- 
tions: "e" period. 
January 31, Monday 

Registration for students not enrolled dur- 
ing the fall semester. Students should come 
in person to the Registrar's Office between 
10:00 A.M. and 3:00 P.M. 
Semester break recess ends at 8:00 A.M. 



Spring Term 
January 31, Monday 

Third period "c" and "cd" courses begin. 
February 9, Wednesday 

All studv cards due in Registrar's Office by 
3:00 P.M. Students who hand in late study 
cards will be charged a S15 fee. After a 
studv card is filed, all changes must be 
made on drop add petitions. A S10 fee is 
charged for each petition processed. Stu- 
dents are allowed one free petition during 
the "d" period. 

Last dav to drop add and change grading 

options for "c" and "cd" courses. 

Last day to register for the spring term or to 

cancel registration with refund of spring 

term bill payment. 

February 21, Monday 

Washington's Birthday, a holiday. 

February 16, Wednesday 

Bound, signed theses due by 3:00 P.M. in 

the Registrar's Office for doctoral students 

applving for March degrees. 

March 25, Friday 

Third period ends. 

Spnng recess begins at 5:30 P.M. 

April 4, Monday 

Spring recess ends at 8:00 A.M. 

April 4, Monday 

Fourth period "d" courses begin. 

Deadline for filing degree applications for 

degrees in June. 



April 11, Monday 

Last day to drop add and change grading 
options for "d" courses by 3:00 P.M. 
Last day to cross-register for "d" courses 
by 3:00 P.M. 
May 2, Monday 

Last day to file petition for Nonresident 
doctoral status for the academic year 
1983-84. 
May 27, Friday 
Fourth period ends. 

Deadline for registration and tutorial forms 
for HSPH summer tutorials. Deadline for 
completing fall term courses graded as In- 
complete. 
May 30, Monday 
Memorial Dav, a holidav. 
May 31 through June 8 
Post class period. 
June 1, Wednesday 

Bound, signed theses due by 3:00 P.M. in 
Registrar's Office for doctoral students ap- 
plving for June degrees. 
June 9, Thursday 
Commencement. 
August 15, Monday 

Deadline for filing degree applications for 
degree in November, 1983. 



A Note from the Dean 



The School's primary missions are the education of scholars who seek to 
understand and ameliorate the health problems of society, the execution of 
the research that addresses those problems, and the training of profession- 
als who deal with them. The scope of its teaching and research programs 
extends all the way from the development of concepts and methods through 
studies of natural phenomena and of policy development, to the ultimate 
steps of implementation and evaluation. The School's programs concern 
two major areas. The first is disease prevention and involves the biological, 
chemical, physical and social factors that affect the health of society. The 
second is the organization and function of systems involved in the delivery 
of health services. 

Public health is not itself a discipline, but its practitioners require exper- 
tise in one or more of a group of disciplines. The increasing complexity of 
public health questions requires the skills of quantitative analytic, natural, 
behavioral, social, and managerial scientists. The academic programs of the 
School must impart a sound background in a basic discipline as well as an 
active and credible experience in the application of the discipline to health 
problems. They must also demonstrate how people from different disci- 
plines can cooperate in approaches to health problems. 

We are a professional school. Strong training programs are required for 
new health professionals and for those in mid-career status. Health care 
systems in this country and abroad require professionals well-equipped to 
plan and manage the use of resources. With recent and prospective changes 
in health policy in the United States, our professional graduates must be 
equipped to anticipate, encourage and deal with change, and to be among 
its leaders. In our complicated society, critical problems in areas such as 
occupational health, nutrition, population, and pollution of the air, the soil 
and the water all share certain characteristics. A better data base of solid 
scientific information is essential, but inadequate by itself, to equip profes- 
sionals to identify and implement socially appropriate and effective policy. 
Resources are scarce, and costs and benefits must be calculated. Large 
organizations must often be influenced to change their behavior and large 
groups of people mobilized to implement new policies. And this must be 
done in a context in which available data are incomplete, inference difficult, 
and the world not well understood. 

The School's professional programs, therefore, must be based on both 
natural and social sciences and must depend heavily on quantitative ana- 
lytic methods. The programs must emphasize a symbiotic relationship 
between our historically strong areas and a potentially unique set of ana- 
lytic and managerial skills applied to health — all of which are needed to 
improve public health in the current context. This is true not only for degree 
programs designed to train new health professionals, but also for our efforts 
to rapidly assist today's public health professionals by making available 
strong mid-career educational opportunities. 



The School has traditionally sponsored programs directed at the health 
problems of the developing world. Disease, malnutrition, population ex- 
cess relative to resources, and the closelv linked problems of inadequate 
educational opportunities and economic under-development are of great 
professional concern to much of our faculty and student body. That the 
School should be concerned with these critical problems is generallv 
agreed. The question of appropriate roles for the School in this area is now 
receiving much faculty attention, and will surely be guided by the judg- 
ment and advice of colleagues from developing countries. As health pro- 
grams in those countries evolve, continuing change in our programs can 
(and should) be anticipated. 

The boundaries of public health are ever widening, and this School has 
assumed a leadership role in that process. It is continuing its commitment 
to traditional public health approaches and integrating them with ap- 
proaches more recently identified as important. Our students must gain an 
appreciation of, and participate in, the major contributions to health made 
by a growing circle of disciplines. 




Administration 



The University 

President and Fellows of 
Harvard College 

(This Board is commonlv known as 
the Corporation ) 

Derek Curtis Bok, A B , J.D., A.M., LL.D., 
President 

Hugh Calkins, A.B., LL.B., Fellow of Harvard 
College 

Colman Mockler, Jr., A.B., M.B.A., Fellow of 
Harvard College 

Charles Pence Slichter, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 
Fellow of Harvard College 

Robert Gregg Stone, Jr., A.B., Fellow of 
Harvard College 

Andrew Heiskell, Ph.B., Fellow of Harvard 
College 

George Putnam, A.B., M.B.A., Treasurer of 
Harvard College 

Robert Shenton, A.B., M.B.A., Ph.D., 
Secretary to the Corporation 

Frances Mary Gabron, Assistant Secretary to 
the Corporation 



The School of 
Public Health 

Administrative Officers 

Derek Curtis Bok, A.B., J.D., A.M., LL.D., 
President 

Howard Haym Hiatt, M.D., Dean of the 
Faculty of Public Health 

Elkan Rogers Blout, A.B., Ph.D., A.M. (hon.), 
D.Sc. (hon.), Dean for Academic Affairs 

Kenneth Paul Barclay, A.B., M.B.A., 
Associate Dean for Administration 

Howard Jules Levy, S B., S.M., M.B.A., 
Associate Dean for Finance and Operations 

Marlene Yvonne MacLeish, B.A., Ed.M., 
Ed.D., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and 
Alumni Relations 

Ann Rosenthal Oliver, A.B., Ed.M., M.P.H., 
Assistant Dean for Academic Administration 
and Affirmative Action Officer 
Louise Smith Catanzano, A.B., Registrar 

Richard Redding Monson, S.M., M.D., S.M. 
in Hyg., S.D. in Hyg., Director of Admissions 

Emily Kramer Morrison, S.B., Assistant to the 
Dean for International Activities 
Margaret Catherine Salmon, S.B., Assistant to 
the Dean for Faculty Administration and 
Director of Financial Aid 

Margaret Rose Courtney, A.B., Publications 
Officer 

Marcello Pagano, B.Sc, S.M., Ph.D., Acting 
Director of the Health Sciences Computing 
Facility 

Norman Henry Peterson, Director of Facilities 
and Administrative Services 

Juanita Leigh Reynolds, A.B., M.P.H., 
Director of the Associates Program 

Joyce Walsh, A.B., Personnel Officer 

James Joseph Feeney, A.B., M.D., Director of 

the Medical Area Health Service 

C. Robin LeSueur, B.A., B.S.W., M.L.S., 

Librarian, Francis A. Countway Library of 

Medicine 



Administrative Board 

Derek Curtis Bok, President (ex officio) 

Howard Haym Hiatt, Chairman 

Elkan Rogers Blout, Vice Chairman 

David Elliott Bell 

John Rouben David 

Margaret Elizabeth Drolette 

Myron Elmer Essex 

Robert Pershing Geyer 

John Bertram Little 

Brian MacMahon 

Dade William Moeller 

C. Frederick Mosteller 

Isabelle Valadian 

Marvin Zelen 

Margaret Catherine Salmon, Secretary 

Directors of Centers, Offices, and 
Special Programs 

David Elliott Bell, A.B., A.M., Director of the 
Center for Population Studies 

J. Larry Brown, Ph.D., Director of the 
Community Health Improvement Program 
John Rouben David, A.B., M.D., A.M., 
Director of the Center for the Prevention of 
Infectious Diseases 

Margaret Elizabeth Drolette, A.B., M.P.H., 
Ph.D., Chief Coordinator of the Master of 
Public Health Program 

Howard Stanley Frazier, Ph.B., M.D., Director 
of the Center for the Analysis of Health 
Practices 

Donald Frederick Homig, S B , Ph.D., 
Director of Interdisciplinary Programs in 
Health 

John Bertram Little, A.B., M.D., Director of 
the Kresge Center for Environmental Health 

Dade William Moeller, S B., S.M., Ph.D., 
Director of the Office of Continuing Education 

Jay Andrew Winsten, A.B., Ph.D., Director of 
the Office of the Health Policy Information 
and Director of Foundations and Government 
Relations 



Degree Requirements 



The School of Public Health offers programs leading to the graduate degrees 
of Master of Public Health (M.P.H.), Doctor of Public Health (Dr.P.H.), 
Master of Occupational Health (M.O.H.), Master of Science in a specified field 
(S.M. in . . . ), and Doctor of Science (S.D.). The general degree require- 
ments and the respective requirements for admission are discussed in the 
following sections. 

Master of Public Health 

The program leading to the Master of Public Health degree consists of one 
academic year of study designed to prepare professionals for careers in 
public health practice. Through the core curriculum, the program provides 
a broad background in various disciplines basic to public health. Through 
the choice of elective courses students may acquire more breadth of knowl- 
edge or may pursue in some depth one or more areas of particular relevance 
to their career goals. The M.P.H. degree program may serve as a required 
academic year for residency training in General Preventive Medicine and 
Occupational Medicine (see p. 19). 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants to the M.P.H. program must satisfy the Committee on Admis- 
sions and Degrees as to their academic ability, the relevance of their pre- 
vious education and experience, and their overall qualifications for grad- 
uate professional education in public health. Ordinarily, an applicant 
should hold a doctoral degree in medicine, dentistry, or veterinary 
medicine. Consideration is also given to applicants who hold doctoral 
degrees in biology, behavioral sciences, other natural sciences and social 
sciences, or law, economics, engineering, and certain related fields re- 
garded by the School as appropriate background for entrance into the 
public health profession. Applicants who hold an earned doctoral degree 
are urged to submit scores from the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) or other aptitude tests such as the Law School Admis- 
sion Test (LSAT), the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), or the 
Dental Aptitude Test (DAT), if available. 

Consideration for admission to the M.P.H. program is given also to an 
applicant who holds a master's degree in a field related to public health such 
as nursing or social work, with a highly distinguished academic record, and 
substantial professional experience (usually at least three years in an ad- 
ministrative position of responsibility). These applicants must be able to 
demonstrate sufficient knowledge and competence to satisfy the Commit- 
tee on Admissions and Degrees as to their qualifications for professional 
public health education and must submit scores from the Aptitude Test of 
the Graduate Record Examination. Scores from the GRE Aptitude Test 
should be no more than five years old. 

Applicants from countries where English is not the language of instruc- 
tion must submit a score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language 



(TOEFL). Ordinarily, the TOEFL score must be 550 or better before the 
applicant can be considered for admission. 

If a student who is enrolled in the M.P.H. program wishes to continue at 
the School after completing the M.P.H. , he or she may consider applying for 
a Master of Science or doctoral program in any of the departments which 
offer such programs for which he or she meets the requirements. Interested 
students should refer to the section on admissions for procedures and 
application deadlines. 

Requirements for the Degree 

An M.P.H. degree candidate must spend one academic year in residence at 
the University and must successfully complete courses totaling a minimum 
of 40 credit units. Students will be encouraged to take a total of 45 to 50 
credit units. 

Candidates for the M.P.H. degree are expected to complete the require- 
ments in one academic year of full-time study. In rare instances, upon 
written request to the Committee on Admissions and Degrees, a student 
may be allowed to complete the program over a period of two academic 
years. The M.P.H. core courses must be completed in the first year. 

Students who have taken courses at the School prior to entrance into this 
degree program may be able to use those courses to satisfy specific M.P.H. 
or departmental course requirements, but they must still complete a 
minimum of 40 credit units as degree candidates. In any event, students are 
required to pay one full year of tuition. 

The Core Curriculum 

The core curriculum, required of all M.P.H. degree candidates, is designed 
to provide a fundamental knowledge of the major areas of public health. 
Students must take the four core courses which cover the environment, 
quantitative methods, and health administration and management. In ad- 
dition, students select one course that uses the case method to integrate the 
various disciplines of public health. The core courses are: 

EHI 201a or 201c Principles of Environmental Health I (2.5 credit 
units) plus either 202b Principles of Environmental Health II (2.5 
credit units) or 203d Principles of Environmental Health III (2.5 
credit units) 

BIO 201a, b Principles of Biostatistics (5 credit units) 

EPI 201a Introduction to Epidemiology or EPI 221a, b Epidemiology 

in Public Health (2.5 credit units) 
HPM 221a, b Administration of Health Services (5 credit units) 
AND a case studies course. A list of case studies courses will be provided 
before registration. 
Ordinarily, the core courses represent less than half of the total number of 
credit units recommended for the degree, thus allowing for flexibility in the 
program. Descriptions of each course appear in the section, Courses of 
Instruction. 



Master of Public Health Program Office 

Chief Coordinator: Dr. Drolette 
Coordinators: Dr. Boyer and Dr. Monson 

The coordinators have day-to-day responsibility for the M.P.H. degree 
program, oversee the core curriculum, and serve as the M.P.H. Subcommit- 
tee of the Committee on Admissions and Degrees. They meet regularly with 
the Master of Public Health Program Committee, composed of a faculty 
representative of each department at the School, and representatives of 
students, alumni, and the School administration. The M.P.H. Program 
Office, located in the Office of Student Affairs, serves as a departmental 
office for students in the General Program, and provides a central source of 
information about the M.P.H. degree program to all students and appli- 
cants. 

Departmental Concentrations 

The M.P.H. is an interdisciplinary' degree and does not carry a departmen- 
tal designation. Many students have specialized goals and choose to take 
most of their elective courses in one department. They often prefer to 
concentrate in that department. Departments differ in their expectations of 
M.P.H. degree candidates. Some advise them to take a specific set of 
courses over and above the M.P.H. core curriculum, while others deter- 
mine students' needs on an individual basis. For further information about 
a specific departmental concentration, please check with the department. 

The General Program 

The General Program, under the direction of the coordinators of the M.P.H. 
program, takes cognizance of the fact that many students seek a broader 
view of public health than that which a departmental affiliation offers. 
Students in the General Program may choose their elective courses from a 
variety of courses offered by the School of Public Health and other faculties 
at Harvard and M.I.T. Faculty advisors are assigned with each student's 
background and interests in mind. Members of the M.P.H. Committee 
serve as advisors to most of the students in the General Program. Even 
within the General Program it is possible for a student to concentrate to 
some extent in a particular discipline through the appropriate choice of 
electives. 

The International Track 

The Office of International Health Programs (see p. 65) has developed a 
"track" for students interested in careers in international health. The 
courses, which supplement the core curriculum and make up the Interna- 
tional Health track, are: 




Dr. Drolette (left) and Dr. Boyer (right) re- 
view M.P.H. alumni records with staff as- 
sistant Ruth Steinbrecher. 



Master of Public Health / 11 



ID 209a, b Health Services in Developing Countries (2.5 credit units) 
Plus 2 of the following 3: 

NUT 210a, b Nutrition Problems of Less Developed Countries 
(2.5 credit units) 

POP 200a, b Introduction to Population Sciences (2.5 credit units) 
TPH 201a Ecology, Epidemiology, and Control of Important Parasitic 
Diseases of Developing Countries (3 credit units) 
The Office also serves as a source of information to students on other 
courses which are relevant to international health. 

Combined Degree Programs 

Students currently enrolled in an M.D., D.M.D., D.D.S., or D.V.M. pro- 
gram may apply for admission to the M.P.H. program, provided that a 
combined program can be arranged that meets the approval of both the 
Committee on Admissions and Degrees at the School of Public Health and 
the institution from which the doctoral degree is being earned. Students 
usually apply in their second or third year of medical, dental, or veterinary 
school for enrollment in their third or fourth year. Requirements for the 
M.P.H. degree (described on p. 10) are the same for students in the com- 
bined degree program as for all other M.P.H. degree candidates. Students 
enrolled in a combined degree program with the M.P.H. will receive the 
M.P.H. upon successful completion of both degree programs and conferral 
of the doctoral degree. 

Doctor of Public Health 

The Doctor of Public Health is an advanced professional degree for those 
who intend to pursue academic or research careers in public health, includ- 
ing administrative, planning, or evaluation roles in public health practice. 
The degree is granted on successful completion of an approved program of 
independent and original investigation in a special field of public health 
and the presentation of the results of this research in an acceptable thesis. 

Requirements for Admission 

An applicant for admission to candidacy for the Doctor of Public Health 
degree normally must be a graduate of an approved school of medicine, 
dental medicine, or veterinary medicine. Depending on the intended field 
of specialization, consideration may also be given to a candidate who holds 
an advanced degree in one of the disciplines basic to public health. In 
addition, the applicant must hold, or be in progress toward, the degree of 
Master of Public Health, or its equivalent, from an approved institution. 

Applicants must be able to satisfy the Committee on Admissions and 
Degrees as to their overall qualifications for doctoral study at the School and 
must demonstrate potential ability to undertake original investigation in a 
special field. Scores for the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion must be submitted by all applicants who do not hold an earned doctoral 
degree and should be no more than five years old. 

12 / Degree Requirements 



Applicants who hold an earned doctoral degree are urged to submit 
aptitude scores from the GRE, or other tests such as LSAT, MCAT, or DAT, 
if available. 

Requirements for the Degree 

Formal requirements for the Doctor of Public Health degree are the same as 
those for the Doctor of Science degree. A brief summary of these require- 
ments appears on p. 17. 

Master of Occupational Health 

The program leading to the Master of Occupational Health degree is de- 
signed to provide physicians with postgraduate training in the public 
health disciplines that are relevant to the development of programs to 
prevent occupational disease and injury. This one-year degree program 
may be taken as part of a two-year approved residency in occupational 
medicine, or it may be taken as an independent one-year program. 

Requirements for Admission 

Candidates must be graduates of an approved school of medicine and must 
satisfy the Committee on Admissions and Degrees as to their scholastic 
ability to study at the graduate level. Students from the United States must 
have completed an internship or residency of at least twelve months in a 
hospital approved by the American Medical Association. Applicants are 
urged to submit scores from the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) 
or the scores of the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE), if the latter are available. 

Requirements for the Degree 

Candidates for the M.O.H. degree must spend one academic year in resi- 
dence at the University and must successfully complete a program of at least 
40 credit units, comprising both required and elective courses. 

All candidates are expected to take the following courses unless they can 
demonstrate equivalent preparation: 

1. Biostatistics 201a, b, Principles of Biostatistics (5 credit units) 

2. Epidemiology 201a, Introduction to Epidemiology (2.5 credit 
units) or Epidemiology 221a, b, Epidemiology in Public Health 
(2.5 credit units) 

3. Environmental Health Interdepartmental 201a or 201c; and 
202b; or 203d, Principles of Environmental Health (5 credit units) 

4. Physiology 205a, b, Principles of Toxicology (5 credit units), 
Physiology 207c, d, Radiation Biology (5 credit units) or Micro- 
biology 212a, b, Introduction to Cancer Biology (5 credit units) 

5. Environmental Health Interdepartmental 207a, b, Policy Issues in 
Occupational Health (5 credit units) 



6. Environmental Health Interdepartmental 251c, d, Basic Prob- 
lems in Occupational Health and Industrial Environments (5 credit 
units) 

7. Epidemiology 202b, Principles of Epidemiology I: Elements of 
Study Design and Data Analysis or Epidemiology 215c, d, En- 
vironmental and Occupational Epidemiology (2.5 credit units) 

8. Environmental Health Sciences 255a, Health Hazards of Man- 
ufacturing Processes (2.5 credit units) 

9. Environmental Health Interdepartmental 254b, Introduction to 
Industrial Hygiene (1.25 credit units) 

10. Biostatistics 202c, d, Statistical Methods for Epidemiologic Re- 
search (5 credit units). Not required, but strongly recommended. 
The total number of credits in required courses is 33.75. Additional 
courses may be selected from the curriculum approved for residencies in 
occupational medicine. 

Master and Doctor of Science 

The School offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science in 
designated fields of concentration and Doctor of Science. The prospective 
applicant should note that in some areas, the Master of Science program is 
intended primarily or wholly as preparation for doctoral study; applicants 
are screened for their interest in, and potential for, doctoral work, and the 
majority of students continue toward the Doctor of Science degree. In 
other areas, the Master of Science is viewed primarily or wholly as a 
professional degree; while a small percentage of students may continue for 
the doctorate, the majority discontinue study upon receipt of the S.M. 
degree. Finally, students in still other areas are divided almost equally 
between those who pursue the Doctor of Science degree and those who 
discontinue their studies upon receipt of the S.M. degree. 

Occasionally, a student may be admitted to a master's program or to 
candidacy for a doctoral degree in more than one of the disciplines, if the 
program meets the requirements of the respective departments or programs 
involved. In such instances, the degree conferred specifies the areas. 

Because there is considerable variability among the S.M. and S.D. 
programs in different fields, both in their overall goals and their specific 
admission and degree requirements, applicants are urged to consult the 
program descriptions. These descriptions provide basic information about 
programs in specific areas; additional information may be obtained by 
contacting the respective departments or programs, as indicated in the 
degree designation. 



Master of Science in Specified Field 

In general, the programs leading to the degree of Master of Science in a 
specified field of concentration are designed for students with interests in 
the scientific basis of public health and preventive medicine. The degree is 
granted upon fulfillment of a program of advanced work in the public 
health disciplines represented by departments and certain programs in the 
School. Students may be admitted to either a one- or a two-year master's 
program, depending upon the requirements of the particular program. 
Information about requirements for one- and two-year programs in various 
areas is included in the program descriptions. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicants to Master of Science degree programs must satisfy the Commit- 
tee on Admissions and Degrees as to their overall qualifications and prom- 
ise for successful graduate study at the School. Applicants must also satisfy 
the department or program to which admission is sought that they have an 
adequate academic and or professional background appropriate for spe- 
cialization in that field. 

Conditions of eligibility for one-year or two-year programs vary with the 
area or department in which a student wishes to specialize. Prospective 
applicants should consult program descriptions for more specific informa- 
tion. 

Generally, eligibility for admission to a one-year program is limited to 
graduates of approved schools of medicine, dentistry, or veterinary 
medicine, or to applicants who have earned doctoral or, for some programs, 
master's degrees in fields acceptable to the department(s) to which admis- 
sion is sought. Applicants holding master's degrees may be considered for 
admission to one-year or to two-year programs, depending upon their 
prior educational and professional background and upon the particular 
requirements of the program to which thev wish to apply. 

An applicant holding a baccalaureate degree is normally considered for 
admission to a two- vear program, in order to complete the requirements for 
a Master of Science degree. For a few programs, including industrial hy- 
giene, air pollution control, and radiological health, applicants may be 
considered for a one-year program if they hold a bachelor's degree with 
adequate scientific and engineering training and if they have had at least 
two years of relevant professional experience in the field of specialization. 

Occasionally, a year or more of appropriate graduate work in an ap- 
proved institution may enable a student to fulfill two-year program re- 
quirements in one year. In some cases, however, program requirements are 
such that a student must spend one-and-a-half or two years in residence in 
order to complete the necessary courses, regardless of prior training and 
experience. 

All candidates for admission to a Master of Science program, who do not 
hold an earned doctoral degree, must submit scores from the Aptitude Test 
of the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants who hold an earned doc- 
toral degree are urged to submit scores from the GRE or other tests such as 



the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), the Medical College Admission 
Test (MCAT), or the Dental Aptitude Test (DAT), if available. 

The GRE is required for all applicants to the Department of Health Policy 
and Management except physicians, dentists, and medical or dental stu- 
dents applying for the Medical/Dental Track who may submit the MCAT or 
DAT scores. 

Applicants are advised to take the Graduate Record Examination no later 
than the December test administration date. In order to expedite the admis- 
sions process, applicants who have taken the Graduate Record Examination 
in a prior academic year are advised to send a photocopy of their own 
G.R.E. "Report to the Candidate" when returning their completed applica- 
tion form. GRE scores submitted should be no more than five years old. An 
official score report must be received from the Educational Testing Service 
before final action will be taken on the application. Additional information 
concerning the Graduate Record Examination requirement is included in 
the instructions accompanying the application form. 

Requirements for the Degree 

Students admitted to a one-year program must spend a minimum of one 
academic year in residence at the University and must successfully com- 
plete a program of at least 40 credit units. Students admitted to a two-year 
program must spend two academic years in residence and must success- 
fully complete a program of at least 80 credit units. 

While specific course requirements vary from program to program, all 
candidates for a Master of Science degree are required to take Biostatistics 
201a, b and Epidemiology 201a or 221a, b, unless they can demonstrate 
equivalent preparation. Candidates who do not have a background in 
medicine or biology are advised to take Physiology 203a, b, or its equiva- 
lent, or a course in general biology elsewhere. Beyond these minimal course 
requirements, each program may specify additional courses that are neces- 
sary for satisfactory fulfillment of degree requirements in the particular area 
of specialization. These specific course requirements are generally not 
listed in this catalog. The student should consult with his or her adviser or 
department or program head about these requirements before deciding 
which courses to take. 

Combined Degree Programs 

The admission and degree requirements for the Master of Science degree 
are the same as those listed for Master of Public Health degree. 

Doctor of Science 

The Doctor of Science degree is an advanced graduate degree for those who 
intend to pursue academic or research careers in public health. The degree 
is granted on successful completion of a program of independent and 
original research in one of the basic disciplines of public health, and upon 
the presentation of this research in an acceptable thesis. 



Requirements for Admission 

Applicants for admission to candidacy' for a Doctor of Science degree must 
satisfy the Committee on Admissions and Degrees and the department of 
specialization as to their overall qualifications for doctoral study and their 
ability to undertake original research in their chosen field. All candidates 
for a Doctor of Science degree must hold a baccalaureate degree. In some 
instances, an applicant will be expected to complete the Master of Science 
degree at the School before being granted admission to doctoral study. In 
such cases, the student will first be admitted to a Master of Science pro- 
gram. Scores for the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination 
must be submitted by all applicants to doctoral programs, who do not hold 
earned doctoral degrees, and should be no more than five years old. Appli- 
cants who hold an earned doctoral degree are urged to submit Aptitude Test 
scores from the GRE, or LSAT, MCAT, or DAT tests, if available. 

Because specific prerequisites vary with the discipline or field of spe- 
cialization, prospective applicants are urged to consult the program de- 
scriptions in this Register and the department or program to which admis- 
sion is sought for more detailed information. 

Requirements for the Degree 

A minimum of two academic years of full-time study in residence at the 
University is required of students enrolled in the doctoral program. The 
required work and preparation of an acceptable thesis, however, ordinar- 
ily takes longer. Residence requirements are fulfilled by payment of tui- 
tion (see pp. 75, 76) and pursuit of an academic program approved by the 
department of concentration and the Committee on Admissions and De- 
grees. 

The Committee on Admissions and Degrees is responsible for overseeing 
the programs of all doctoral students. During the registration period each 
new doctoral student will receive a manual detailing the principles and 
procedures that are to be followed. A brief summary of requirements is 
given below. 

Each doctoral student is required to take 40 to 60 credits in graduate- 
level courses distributed over a major and two minor fields. Each minor 
field will ordinarily consist of at least 10 credits in formal courses. Such re- 
quirements may be reduced in cases of prior relevant course work or ex- 
perience. They may be increased in cases where there has been a substan- 
tial shift in field. Courses in the major and minor fields must be completed 
with distinction, with grades of "A" or "B." Unless equivalent prepara- 
tion can be demonstrated, doctoral students must take Epidemiology 201a 
or 221a, b as well as courses in biostatistics through the intermediate level 
(ordinarily BIO 202c, d). Departments may stipulate specific course re- 
quirements and may require written and or oral examinations on the 
course work in the three fields. 



Qualifying Examination 

By the end of the second year the student should be prepared to take the oral 
qualifying examination. The main emphasis of this examination is to assess 
the student's potential to perform research in his/her chosen field. Since 
most doctoral research in the School requires a substantive knowledge of 
more than one discipline or field, the examining committee will include 
faculty from disciplines representing the minor fields as well as the major. 
The examination will include questioning in the major and minor fields 
outside of the proposed research. 

A research committee consisting of the student's adviser and other fac- 
ulty members is to be appointed within one month after the qualifying 
examination is passed. This committee has the responsibility for guiding 
the student's research through to completion. It will meet with the student 
at least once every six months to discuss details of the student's progress. 
Thesis 

An acceptable thesis must ordinarily be submitted within five years of the 
date of registration as a doctoral candidate. The thesis should consist of one 
or more manuscripts suitable for publication in a scientific medium appro- 
priate to the candidate's field. Detailed requirements are available from the 
Registrar. 

The thesis will not be accepted until a public presentation and discussion 
has been held, with the research committee in attendance. 

Three bound copies of the approved thesis must be in the Registrar's 
Office before the faculty will vote the degree at their regular meetings in 
October, February, or June. 

Occasionally, thesis work will be performed in nonresident status. Before 
the doctoral subcommittee of the CAD grants such status, it is necessary 
that the research committee meet with the candidate to appraise the thesis 
plan. Agreement must be reached and the doctoral subcommittee must be 
advised in writing before departure of the student as to (1) acceptability and 
feasibility of the proposed thesis plan; (2) the timing and scope of the 
periodic written reports that will be required of the student; (3) ar- 
rangements that have been made or will be made for direct field supervi- 
sion of the student; and (4) the minimum period of time the student will 
spend back at the School before the presentation and defense of the thesis. 
In no case will the doctoral subcommittee grant in nonresident status for 
more than one year at a time. 

Students wishing further information on doctoral program requirements 
should refer to the Guidelines for Doctoral Study available in the Registrar's 
Office. 



18 Degree Requirements 



Residency for Board Certification 

The School offers approved residency training leading to certification by 
the American Board of Preventive Medicine in the following areas: 

General Preventive Medicine, in the specialty areas of 
Epidemiology 

Health Sen-ices Administration 
International Health 

Occupational Medicine 

For physicians who apply and who are accepted into a General Preven- 
tive Medicine or Occupational Medicine Residency, credit is given for one 
or two years of study leading to one or more public health degrees. A 
residence mav also include supervised experience which may or may not be 
part of a doctoral program. 

Additional information about the residence programs mav be obtained 
from Dr. Brian MacMahon, Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology 
(for the General Preventive Medicine residency); Dr. Alonzo Yerby, Profes- 
sor of Health Services Administration (for the specialty area of health 
services administration of the General Preventive Medicine residency); Dr. 
M. G. Hen-era- Acena. Associate Professor of Medicine in the Department of 
Nutrition (for the specialty area of international health of the General 
Preventive Medicine residency); and Dr. Edward Baker, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Occupational Medicine (for the Occupational Medicine residency). 

None of the residencies as such involves stipend or other financial sup- 
port. Some financial support may be available through traineeships or 
National Research Service awards for degree programs (U.S. citizenship or 
permanent residence status required). Further information on financial aid 
can be obtained from the individuals listed above, or from Ms. Margaret C. 
Salmon, Director of Financial Aid. 

Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in Dental Public Health 
and Dental Care Administration 

The School of Dental Medicine, in cooperation with the School of Public 
Health and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, offers a pro- 
gram covering three academic vears of postdoctoral study, intended to 
prepare a limited number of individuals for creative full-time teaching, 
research, and or administrative careers in dental public health and dental 
care organization. Each person accepted into the program will be appointed 
as a Clinical or Research Fellow in Dental Care Administration at the School 
of Dental Medicine. The program is open to dentists and other qualified 
health professionals. 

The program is in three parts of approximately one year each, which need 
not be completed in succession. One part of the program involves a formal 
course leading to a degree of Master of Public Health. The M.P.H. core 
courses must be completed in the first year at the School of Public Health 
and all requirements for the Master of Public Health degree in a maximum 



of two academic years. Candidates with an M.P.H. or equivalent from 
another school, however, may be accepted into the Postdoctoral Fellowship 
Program with one year advanced standing. The second portion involves a 
one-year supervised residency at the community, state, or national level in 
health policy and administration. This residency meets the requirements of 
the American Board of Dental Public Health. The third portion affords 
opportunity for advanced didactic work and research at the School of Dental 
Medicine, the School of Public Health, other departments of the University, 
and/or other institutions. Epidemiological or health services research can 
be carried on over the entire three-year period in a variety of situations 
involving either new or continued studies. A research thesis is prepared for 
presentation at the end of the third year. 

Fellows in Dental Care Administration who wish to become candidates 
for a degree in public health must meet the admission requirements of and 
be accepted into the School of Public Health. Application should be made 
directly to the School of Dental Medicine, whose Committee on Postdoc- 
toral Education will forward the applicant's file to the School of Public 
Health for consideration. 

Upon successful completion of this program, the candidate will receive 
the M.P.H. degree from the School of Public Health, as well as a Certificate 
of Postdoctoral Study in Dental Care Administration and a certificate of 
completion of residency requirements from the Harvard School of Dental 
Medicine. 

Academic study beyond the master's level may be arranged with the 
School of Public Health and other departments of the University. 

For further information and application forms, write to the Head, Com- 
mittee on Postdoctoral Education, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, 188 
Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. 



Departments and Programs 



Department of Behavioral Sciences 

Faculty 

Professor and Visiting Professor D. Hamburg and Mertens; Associate Professors 
Benfari, Masnick and McAuliffe; Assistant Professors Babor, Gortmaker and D. 
Walker; Lecturer Wechsler 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Visiting Lecturer Levine; Research Associate Lecturer Eckenrode; Research Associ- 
ate Orlandi 

Introduction 

The Department of Behavioral Sciences seeks to train researchers, teachers 
and professionals in the knowledge and analytical skills of the behavioral 
sciences relevant to significant public health issues. The specific focal 
points for teaching and research are: (1) health promotion and education 
programs; (2) the influences of behavior on health and disease; (3) behav- 
ioral pathologies, including addiction to drugs and alcohol, mental illness, 
and child abuse; (4) behavioral aspects of health services, including 
psycho-social factors affecting the utilization of services and compliance 




with medical regimens, as well as the behavior of health professionals; and Dr Meriem of Behavioral Saences lectu 
(5) social science methodologies as applied to public health problems and "Inducing Social Change." 
the evaluation of health services and programs. 

Degrees 

Master of Public Health with concentration in Behavioral Sciences; Master 

of Science in Behavioral Sciences; and Doctor of Science. 

Research 

Current projects include research on opiate addiction among street addicts, 
recovering medical professionals and medical patients. The efficacy of 
self-help groups in preventing relapse in heroin addicts is being exper- 
imentally evaluated in Boston and Hong Kong. The study also seeks to learn 
the causes of relapse and how treatment programs may be improved. 

A four-year evaluation of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Rural 
Infant Care Program is examining the success of these programs in reducing 
infant morbidity and mortality. 

Services used by youth and their families before, during, and after 
runaways occur are being studied in five sites across the country. 

An in-depth longitudinal study of developmental processes and "at- 
risk" health behaviors of school-aged pregnant women and adolescent 
parents is being conducted in the metropolitan Boston area. Research 
exploring the relationships among social supports, the availability and use 
of community services, family organizations, and the management and 
functioning of children with chronic illness is ongoing, using data collected 
from the Community Child Health Studies in three communities: Flint, 
Michigan; Cleveland, Ohio; and Berkshire County, Massachusetts. 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 99. 

The American Household in Demo- 
graphic Perspective; Health and Be- 
havior: An Introduction to Behavioral 
Aspects of Public Health; Sociological 
Perspectives in the Study of Health 
Attitudes and Behaviors; Health 
Promotion; Behavioral Analysis; 
Behavior/Lifestyle Change and Risk 
Factor Alteration: Introduction to 
Methods; Inducing Social Change; 
Case Studies in Health Promotion; 
The Epidemiology of Pathological 
Behaviors: Problems, Concepts, and 
Methods; Mental Health Factors in 
Organizations and Industry; Alco- 
holism and Alcohol Abuse; Drug Ad- 
diction and Drug Abuse; Social and 
Behavioral Research Methods; Ad- 
vanced Social and Behavioral Re- 
search Methods. 

In conjunction with another depart- 
ment: Child Development and Social 
Policy. 



The Harvard unit of the nation-wide Multiple Risk Factor Intervention 
Trial (MRFIT) has completed ten years of research testing of the hypothesis 
that mortality from coronary heart disease can be reduced by altering the 
risk factors of elevated blood pressure, elevated blood cholesterol, and 
cigarette smoking. Published analyses show substantial reductions in all 
three risk factors. 

Data collected from the Field Study of Youth Health Promotion Proces- 
ses are being analyzed to determine how unhealthy life-styles are adopted 
and what intervention can prevent the onset of smoking, alcohol and drug 
abuse. Research was done in inner city and suburban schools in Boston 
and in two small towns in California, in collaboration with researchers at 
Stanford University. 

Recent research has examined the area of health training and the role of 
stress and social support systems in the use of primary care health services. 

Programs 
Goals 

Designed to train persons in the behavioral aspects of health and health 
services. Students learn research skills, techniques of applying behavioral 
sciences to public health issues, and relevant elements of behavioral disci- 
plines. 
Curriculum 

Master's candidates do course work in areas of health and behavior, health 
promotion/education, behavioral aspects of health services, and behavioral 
pathologies. Doctoral students are expected to develop expertise in three 
major areas of behavioral sciences, research methods and statistical com- 
puting, and an area of specialization such as the self-help approach to 
alcohol and drug treatment; smoking prevention; and models of contracep- 
tive behavior. 

Admission 

Applicants for the doctoral program must have a baccalaureate degree in a 
related behavioral sciences discipline. These individuals are admitted di- 
rectly into the doctoral program. 

Career Outlook 

Recent graduates have taken research and teaching positions in major 
health institutions and academic settings. 



22 / Departments 



Department of Biostatistics 



Marvin Zelen, S.B., A.M.. Ph.D., Professor of Statistical Science and Chairman of 

the Department 

Faculty 

Professors and Visiting Professors Drolette. Miettinen. Mosteller. Weinstein, and 
WUhamson: Associate Professors Lagakos. Laird, Louis. Pagano, Schoenfeld, 
Tsiatis, and Ware; Assistant Professors Anderson, Begg. Feldman. Feldstein, 
Gelber. German. Larson. Lavin. Maclntyre. Mehta, Stanley (on leave), and Tritchler: 
Lecturers Bailar and Kent; Emeritus Professor Reed 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Lecturers Finison and Watemaux; Research Associate Lew 
Introduction 

The Biostatistics program is designed to prepare students for careers which 
contribute to the theory and practice of statistical science as applied to the 
Health Sciences. Many unique opportunities exist to participate in meth- 
odological research and interdisciplinary collaborations. 

Degrees 

The graduate program offers three Master of Science degrees, and Doctor of 
Science and Doctor of Public Health degrees. 

Activities of the Department 

The Department carries on a broad program of research activities in Biosta- 
tistical Science. During the 1981-82 academic year, there were working 
seminars meeting throughout the year on Risk Assessment, Clinical Trials, 
Methodology of Longitudinal Studies, and Low-Dose Bioassays to Detect 
Carcinogens. A Journal Club meets regularly to review recent literature. 

Current areas of emphasis include: Environmental Health — The Depart- 
ment engages in interdisciplinary research in health effects of air pollution, 
carcinogenesis testing, and environmental monitoring. Recent studies 
have investigated cancer incidence near hazardous waste disposal sites, the 
carcinogenic effects of food dyes, and the effects of particulate air pollution 
on respiratory health among children. Computing — Members of the De- 
partment are involved in research on statistical computing algorithms and 
data-base management. The School of Public Health has excellent comput- 
ing facilities and supports all of the commonly used statistical packages. 
Much of the Department's research on statistical software is carried out on 
the computing facilities at the Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. Medical 
Statistics and Clinical Trials — The Department has a major commitment to 
collaborative clinical research in the treatment of cancer and cardiovascular 
disease. The faculty includes leaders in the development of statistical and 
computing methods for clinical trials, including sequential methods, sur- 
vival data analysis, and data base management. Members of the Depart- 
ment are involved in more than 100 national and international clinical trials 
currently in progress. Health Policy and Decision Sciences — The Department 
engages in research on quantitative problems in health policy and clinical 
decision making. Faculty members are investigating new methods for 




Dr. Ware reviews concepts and methods for 
quantifying relations between variables. 



Biostatistics 23 




Dr. Laird discusses the use of log linear and 
logistic models for analyzing counted data. 



assessing risks and benefits associated with environmental regulations; 
costs, risks, and benefits of clinical practices and medical technologies; and 
the impact of organizational structure on decision making. The Department 
maintains a close relationship with the Center for the Analysis of Health 
Practices and the Department of Health Policy and Management. World 
Health Organization — The Department has been designated as a Biostatis- 
tics Evaluation Center by the World Health Organization. This activity is 
aimed at cancer control activities with special attention to the developing 
countries of the world. Consulting — The Department participates in a wide 
variety of medical research projects through the Biostatistics Consulting 
Laboratory. Students are expected to develop consultative and data analytic 
skills through participation in these consulting projects. 

Programs 

The One- and Two-Year Master's Programs, leading to the S.M. in Biostatis- 
tics, provide rigorous training and practical experience in statistical meth- 
ods. One can also obtain an S.M. which is joint with another Department. 
Students enrolled in the School's M.P.H. Program may concentrate in 
Biostatistics. 

Course work includes the mathematical basis of statistical inference; 
statistical methodology, epidemiology, and computing; and a selection 
from courses in biomedical sciences and health policy and management. 
Besides course work, students are given experience in consulting and 
computing and the opportunity to teach in the Department's School-wide 
courses. 

Candidates should have preparation in calculus and linear algebra. The 
one-year program is limited to students who already have a graduate 
degree in one of the mathematical sciences or who are unusually well 
prepared. 

The Doctoral Program, leading to a Doctor of Public Health or Doctor of 
Science degree, aims to develop the capability for research and scholarship 
as well as providing a rigorous training in statistical practice. 

Doctoral students may concentrate on either a Theoretical Track or an 
Applied Track. Beginning in 1982, there is also an Applied Biomedical 
Computing Program (see below). Course work includes the mathematical 
foundations of statistical inference, statistical methodology, epidemiology, 
and computing. Students on the Applied Track develop expertise in an 
allied field of public health. The students also gain experience in consult- 
ing, computing, and teaching. 

In the second year of course work, doctoral candidates are expected to 
take a comprehensive written examination and make an oral presentation 
of research plans. The doctoral thesis may include either original contrib- 
utions to statistical methodology related to the health sciences or innovative 
application to a field of public health or medicine. 

Students may enter the doctoral program through the master's program 
or can enter the doctoral program directly. 



24 Departments 



The Applied Biomedical Computing Program aims to acquaint students with 
both hardware and software and to train them in areas of application which 
are important in biomedical research. Besides the required courses in 
biostatistics and epidemiology, students in this program will take courses 
in computer operating systems, software engineering, data-base manage- 
ment, graphics, and laboratory science. They will also gain practical experi- 
ence in biomedical computing in one of the Harvard-affiliated hospitals. 

Both master's and doctoral degrees are offered in Biostatistics with spe- 
cial concentration in the Biomedical Computing Program. Admission, 
course work, and dissertation requirements are as described above. 

Course Offerings 

Courses offered by the Department cover a broad range with respect to 
mathematical sophistication and disciplinary focus. 

Elementary courses assume little background in mathematics and are 
designed for a wide audience. They aim to develop facility in quantitative 
reasoning, a command of basic methodology, and a critical appreciation of 
good statistical practice in the health sciences. BIO 201 is a School-wide 
requirement. (For students in Health Policy and Management, BIO 219 is 
substituted.) The other elementary courses are BIO 111 and 113. 

Intermediate courses are designed to develop methodological skills in 
specific areas of application, such as epidemiology, health policy, and 
experimental science. At least one intermediate course is a School-wide 
requirement for doctoral students. The intermediate courses are BIO 202, 
203, 205, 207, 211, 214, 216, 220, 251, 273, and 275. 

Advanced courses require a background in mathematics and are primarily 
intended for degree candidates in Biostatistics. The advanced courses are 
BIO 210, 217, 218, 240, 261, 262, 263, and 274. Students may also take courses 
in the Department of Statistics and at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. 

Admission 

See specific requirements on p. 14 (S.M.) and p. 16 (S.D.). 
Career Outlook 

The career outlook for biostatisticians is very promising. Biostatistics grad- 
uates have secured positions in government, universities, industry, and 
public health centers. Statisticians are needed in the broadly defined areas 
of medical care, drug therapy, health maintenance, environmental control, 
and health care administration. The 1978 report on professional employ- 
ment needs, issued by the National Academy of Science, indicated a critical 
shortage of biostatisticians and epidemiologists with graduate degrees. 
This report also noted that shortages were likely to continue for the next five 
years. 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 
100. 

Principles of Biostatistics; Biostatis- 
tics for Medical Investigators; Com- 
puting Principles and Methods; 
Statistical Methods for Epidemiologic 
Research; Statistical Methods in Ex- 
perimental Research; Vital and 
Health Statistics; Mathematical 
Foundations of Biostatistics; Survey 
Research Methods in Community 
Health; Topics in Biostatistics; Dis- 
crete Data Analysis; Principles of 
Clinical Trials; Probability Theory 
and Applications; Statistical Infer- 
ence; Multivariate Analysis for Quan- 
titative Data; Design of Experiments; 
Data Analysis; Theory of Biometry I; 
Theory of Biometry II; Regression 
and Analysis of Variance; Introduc- 
tion to Computing; Statistical Com- 
puting; Applied Data Management; 
Tutorial Programs; and Research. 

Courses offered in conjunction with 
other departments are listed below. 

Design and Analysis of Case Control 
Studies; Decision Analysis of Health 
and Medical Practices; and Statistical 
Methods for Health Policy and Man- 
agement. 



Biostatistics I 25 



Department of Environmental Health Sciences 



Dade W. Moeller, S.B., S.M., Ph.D., A.M. (hon.), Professor of Engineering in 

Environmental Health and Chairman of the Department 

Faculty 

Professor First; Associate Professors Burgess, Cooper, Dennis, Hinds, D. H. Leith, 
Smith, and Spengler; Assistant Professors Ellenbecker and Keyserling; Lecturers 
Bjarngard, Cudworth, Judy, J. Shapiro, and Webster 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Lecturers and Visiting Lecturers Bracken, Egan, Jaeger, Mahoney, Nelson, Selby, 
and Varner; Research Associates Dockery, Evans, Gilbert, Rudnick, Ryan, and 
Wolfson 

Introduction 

With growing public awareness of the need for environmental pollution 
control and worker protection, increasing attention is being focused on 
these problems at all levels of our society. There are four specialized pro- 
grams offered by the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. Al- 
though an occasional student is admitted to a general program in environ- 
mental health sciences, for which courses may be planned to suit individual 
student interests and career goals, the majority of the students elect one of 
the specialties listed below. In addition to specialized courses, graduate 
education in each of these fields includes courses on human physiology, 
epidemiology, and biostatistics. 

The Department requires that students take all Environmental Health 
Sciences and core program courses under the ordinal grading system. 
Exceptions are the Departmental Seminar and tutorial courses which are 
graded Pass/Fail. 

The Department particularly welcomes inquiries concerning its doctoral 
programs. Candidates selected for these programs include outstanding 
S.M. degree graduates from within the Department as well as applicants 
who have received master's degrees from other institutions. On a limited 
basis, candidates with exceptionally good records at the bachelor degree 
level may be accepted directly into the Department's doctoral program. 

Degrees 

Master and Doctor of Science in Environmental Health Sciences. Generally, 
students who enter the program immediately after completing the bac- 
calaureate degree enroll in the Master of Science program. Upon completion 
of the Master of Science program, they may continue for a doctoral degree. 

Requirements 

Problem analyses and the evaluation and reporting of such analyses are 
expected to be major components of the work of health professionals who 
graduate from these programs. To assure the development of these skills, 
each student accepted into a two-year master's program may elect to con- 
duct an appropriate research or related study and to present a written report 
on it at an acceptable professional level. Such studies and the associated 
reports will generally be completed during the second year of the program. 

26 / Departments 



The time devoted to this effort will be generally five credit units per 
semester, for a total of ten credit units. 

Please see p. 14 for specific degree requirements. 

Research 

Supporting the teaching program are extensive research activities. Current 
studies include the evaluation of exposures to air contaminants of workers 
in the railroad industry, meat handling establishments and silicon carbide 
production facilities; development and application of personal samplers for 
determining individual and population doses to specific air contaminants, 
including those encountered indoors; development and application of 
engineering methods for collection of particles and pollutant gases from 
industrial gas streams; numerical analyses of urban scale atmospheric 
transport; determination of priorities for air pollution source control; 
evaluation of mechanisms for the adsorption of radioactive noble gases on 
activated carbon; analyses of failures of air cleaning svstems in nuclear 
power plants; development of techniques for the control of naturally occur- 
ring radon and radon daughter products in homes; and evaluation of 
countermeasures for protecting the public in case of a nuclear accident. 
Supporting these studies are related cooperative research projects con- 
ducted by the Departments of Physiology and Epidemiology. As a result, 
students have many excellent opportunities for research, either on an 
independent basis or as a participant in an ongoing project. 

In addition to its regular academic programs, the Department is exten- 
sively involved in the activities of the School's Office of Continuing Educa- 
tion. Through these efforts, the Faculty of the Department presents each 
year from 15 to 20 courses, many of which involve extensive laboratory 
exercises. Those courses currently scheduled for presentation during the 
1982-83 academic year are included in the listing given on p. 97. 

Programs 

Air Pollution Control 

Goals 

To provide education in the sciences basic to understanding air pollution 
research and control. 

Curriculum 

Includes courses in community air pollution, health hazards of manufactur- 
ing processes, meteorological aspects of air pollution, identification and 
measurement of air contaminants, aerosol technology, and air and gas 
cleaning. 

Admission 

Candidates for the program normally have a baccalaureate degree in 
engineering, chemistry, physics, or biology. Those with a master's degree 
in a discipline closely related to environmental health and those with a 
baccalaureate degree plus (1) two years of directly relevant experience, or (2) 
three or more years of experience related to their expected degree may be 
able to earn the S.M. degree in one year. 




"Principles of Environmental Health" is the 
course given by Dr. Moeller, Chairman of 
the Department . 



Environmental Health Sciences 27 



Some of the courses in which the De- 
partment Faculty participate are 
listed below. A number of these are 
joint offerings with Faculty members 
in the Department of Physiology; 
others are primarily under the direc- 
tion lit Faculty members in the De- 
partment of Physiology- Descriptions 
can be found beginning on p. 103. 

Environmental Health Interdepart- 
mental Courses 

Principles of Environmental Health; 
Ergonomics Human Factors; Intro- 
duction to Occupational Medicine; 
Policy Issues in Occupational Health; 
Occupational Health and Safety; Crit- 
ical Review of the Scientific Basis for 
Occupational Standards; Basic Prob- 
lems in Occupational Health and In- 
dustrial Environments; Introduction 
to Industrial Hygiene; and Field 
Work. 

Environmental Health Sciences 

Occupational Safety Science; Occu- 
pational Biomechanics and Work 
Physiology; Environmental Control: 
Industrial Ventilation; Noise and Vi- 
bration Control; Aerosol Technology; 
Health Hazards of Manufacturing 
Processes; Community Air Pollution; 
Meteorological Aspects of Air Pollu- 
tion; Identification and Measurement 
of Air Contaminants; Air and Gas 
Cleaning; Introduction to Radiation 
Protection; Introduction to Radiation 
Instrumentation; Concepts and Is- 
sues in Radiation Protection; Radia- 
tion Protection in Medicine; Tutorial 
Programs; and Research. 



Career Outlook 

Recent graduates have taken positions with federal, state, or local regula- 
tory agencies, with consulting firms, with industry, or with universities. 

Industrial Hygiene 
Goals 

The master's program is designed to meet the demand for professional 
personnel with the skills and scientific knowledge that are needed to 
identify and control health stresses associated with the working environ- 
ment — e.g., air contamination, noise, radiation, heat, pressure, etc. 
Curriculum 

Generally includes recommended and required courses dealing with basic 
problems in occupational health and industrial environments, policy issues 
in occupational health, environmental control, identification and meas- 
urement of air contaminants, air and gas cleaning, principles of toxicology, 
human factors in occupational performance and safety, and aerosol tech- 
nology. 

Admission 

Acceptable candidates for the program normally have a bachelor's degree in 
engineering, chemistry, physics, or biology. Although this is primarily a 
two-year program, students with master's degrees in the above disciplines 
and some students with prior training or experience in related areas may be 
able to earn the S.M. degree in one year. It is a terminal program for most 
students, although a few continue toward the Doctor of Science degree. 
Career Outlook 

Recent graduates have taken positions with federal, state, or local regula- 
tory agencies, with consulting firms, with industry, or with universities. 

Environmental Health Management 
Goals 

To provide additional education in the environmental specialties and in 

environmental management and policy analysis. 

Curriculum 

Multidisciplinary program which draws upon courses offered by the Har- 
vard School of Public Health, by other faculties of Harvard University, and 
by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In addition to the basic 
course in environmental health management, students normally take a 
series of courses in air pollution control, industrial hygiene, radiological 
health (specialty areas offered through the Department of Environmental 
Health Sciences), or water pollution control (offered through the Division of 
Applied Sciences of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences), supplemen- 
ted by electives in environmental economics, public health administration, 
political and social sciences, environmental law, environmental planning, 
and health education. 



28 / Departments 



Admission 

Students admitted to the program normally hold a bachelor's degree in 
biology, engineering, geology, or another science. This program is usually 
two years in length and generally includes a field training assignment with 
an environmental health agency during the summer. Selected oppor- 
tunities for continuing toward the doctoral degree are open to qualified 
recipients of the S.M. degree. 

Career Outlook 

Recent graduates have taken administrative or regulatory positions in 
environmental health. 

Radiological Health (Radiation Protection) 
Goals 

To provide students with knowledge of the fundamentals of radiation 
protection. Considerable attention is given to the effects of environmental 
releases of radioactive materials, and the associated requirements for com- 
plying with regulations and standards. 
Curriculum 

Includes recommended and required courses covering radiation protec- 
tion, radiation biology, radiation instrumentation, radiation dosimetry, 
and aerosol technology. 
Admission 

Students admitted to the program normally have bachelor's or master's 
degrees in physics, mathematics, or engineering. Two years are normally 
required to earn the S.M. degree, although some students with prior train- 
ing and/or experience in relevant areas may earn the degree in one year. 
About half the students continue toward the doctoral degree. 

Career Outlook 

Recent graduates have taken positions with the nuclear power industry, 
hospitals, universities, research institutions, governmental regulatory 
agencies, and consulting architectural or engineering firms. 



Courses in conjunction with another 
department: Introduction to Opera- 
tions Management; Political Econ- 
omy of Environmental Health Regu- 
lations; and Environmental Health 
Policy Analysis. 



Environmental Health Sciences / 29 



Department of Epidemiology 



Brian MacMahon, M.B., Ch.B., D.P.H., Ph.D., S.M. in Hyg., M.D., M.D. (hon.), 
Henry Pickering Walcott Professor of Epidemiology and Chairman of the Depart- 
ment 
Faculty 

Professors Hutchison, Miettinen, and Monson; Associate Professors Morrison and 
Rothman; Assistant Professors Gutensohn, A. Walker, and Willett; Lecturer Ellison 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Lecturers and Visiting Lecturers Boice, Cole, Feinleib, Finkle, Jick, Miller, Paffen- 
barger, and Sartwell; Research Associate Yen 

Introduction 

The major objective of the Department is to provide opportunities for 
training and experience in the application of epidemiologic research meth- 
ods to the investigation of diseases of unknown etiology. Emphasis is on 
the cardiovascular disorders, the malignant neoplasms, abnormalities of 
reproduction and development, and other major diseases for which preven- 
tive measures are still unknown or inadequate. 

Degrees 

Master and Doctor of Science in Epidemiology; and Doctor of Public 
Health. 

Research 

Research programs in the Department provide faculty members and grad- 
uate students the opportunity to work together exploring the following 

areas: 

— the role of viruses in the etiology of cancer, particularly in relation to 
Hodgkin's disease 

— the evaluation of different radiotherapy regimens for the treatment of 
Hodgkin's disease 

— the relationship between thyroid disease treatment and breast cancer 

— an examination of cancer incidence in fluoroscopically examined tuber- 
culosis patients 

— the study of mammographic parenchymal patterns and the risk of breast 
cancer 

— the relationship between exposure to chemicals in the workplace and the 
development of cancer 

— an international case-control study of bladder cancer 

— a case-control study of laryngeal-hypopharyngeal cancer 

— a study of congenital heart disease: examining drugs as a causative factor 

— the health effects of oral contraceptives 

— the study of the relationship of hormonal patterns and breast cancer 

— the role of diet in the development of kidney and bladder cancers 

— etiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, with emphasis on immune sys- 
tem disturbances 

— epidemiologic methods, with particular regard to significance testing in 
areas such as proportional mortality ratio and synergism and antago- 
nism 

30 ' Departments 



Programs 
Goals 

The master's program is intended to provide students with basic skills in 
epidemiologic and quantitative methods and in computing, in preparation 
for research careers. The doctoral programs are designed for persons who 
plan careers of research or teaching in epidemiology. 
Curriculum 

The one-year research training program for the S.M. degree includes most 
of the courses offered by the Department, plus courses in principles of 
biostatistics, statistical methods in research, and computing principles 
and methods (which are offered by the Department of Biostatistics), a total 
of 25 to 30 credit units. Additional formal courses in areas of special 
interest and/or supervised research comprise the remainder of the pro- 
gram. The S.D. program is of four to five years' duration for persons 
holding baccalaureate degrees; for persons holding relevant master or 
doctoral degrees, however, the program is shorter, usually two to three 
years in length. Unless course work equivalent to that described above for 
the S.M. degree has been taken previously, most of the first two years of a 
doctoral program is occupied with courses. Subsequently, completion of a 
thesis and experience as a teaching assistant are the principal components. 
The content of the Dr.P.H. program is identical to that of the S.D. program 
and will vary in length, usually from two to five years, depending on the 
individual's background and progress with the thesis component. (Please 
see p. 14 for more specific degree requirements.) 

Please note that either EP1 201a or EP1 221ab satisfies the requirement of an 
introductory course in epidemiology . However, individual programs may require 
one or the other. 

Residency 

A three-year residency in the Department has been approved as satisfying 
residency requirements of the American Board of Preventive Medicine for 
certification in General Preventive Medicine. Requirements of the ap- 
proved residency and of the School's degree programs may be satisfied 
simultaneously. The residency does not satisfy the one-year clinical com- 
ponent required by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. 
Admission 

Acceptable candidates for the S.M. program are physicians, veterinarians, 
and dentists. For qualified students the period of research training may be 
extended by admission to either of the doctoral programs offered by the 
School, or by admission to special student status. Most of the training 
beyond the master's degree is occupied in supervised research experience. 
Potential doctoral candidates must plan at least two years in residence 
beyond completion of the master's degree. 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 
107. 

Introduction to Epidemiology; Prin- 
ciples of Epidemiology I: Elements of 
Study Design and Data Analysis; 
Principles of Epidemiology II: Prob- 
lem Conceptualization and Study De- 
sign; Principles of Epidemiology III: 
Data Analysis and Interference; Prac- 
tice of Epidemiology; Seminars; Top- 
ics in the Theory of Epidemiology; 
Design and Analysis of Case Control 
Studies; Epidemiology of Chronic 
Disease: Psychiatric Disorders and 
Cardiovascular and Respiratory Dis- 
ease; Epidemiology of Cancer; 
Cancer Screening; Environmental 
and Occupational Epidemiology; 
Epidemiology in Public Health; Tuto- 
rial Programs; and Research. 
In conjunction with another depart- 
ment: Nutritional Epidemiology. 



Epidemiology / 31 




■ 



Dr. Monson poses a question to his class in 
"Environmental and Occupational 
Epidemiology." 



The Department considers applications for direct admission to doctoral 
candidacy (S.D. degree) from persons holding baccalaureate degrees with 
strong backgrounds in biology and mathematics; it also encourages candi- 
dates holding other master and doctoral degrees. 

The Dr.P.H. program is available to persons holding the M.P.H. degree. 

Career Outlook 

Some of the positions recent graduates have taken: Officer in Epidemiol- 
ogic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control; epidemiologists at 
the National Cancer Institute; and appointments at universities and medi- 
cal schools in research and instruction. 




"Who Is at Highest Risk of Cancer?" was the topic of the departmental seminar given by 
Dr. Li. 



32 Departments 



Department of Health Policy and Management 



Frederick Mosteller, S.B., S.M., A.M., Ph.D., S.D. (hon.), S.S.D. (hon.), Roger 
Irving Lee Professor of Mathematical Statistics and Chairman of the Department 
Faculty 

Professors Curran, Fineberg, Hamburg, Hedley-Whyte, Herzlinger, Roberts, 
Rosenkrantz, and Yerby; Visiting Professor Gellhorn; Associate Professors Hsiao, 
Shepard, Stason, Thompson, and Young; Assistant Professors Barrett, J. Brown, 
Hemenway, Kane, Palmer, and Thomas; Lecturers Braun, J.L. Brown, P. Feldman, 
Kasten, Segall, Sheldon, Sherman, and Yacovone 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Lecturers and Visiting Lecturers Allen, Bander, Berarducci, Berwick, Bishoff, 
Bloem, Blumenthal, Bossert, Burchfield, Bycoff, Caplan, Cohen, Crampton, Cup- 
pies, Densen, Douglass, Dumbaugh, Field, Hobart, Hoffmann, Holden, Irish, John- 
son, Keith, Komaroff, Koplan, Landy, Liang, Lorch, Marra, Morris, Munier, Nes- 
son, Pyle, Rabkin, Rosenberg, Rosenthal, Sands, Shapiro, Taylor, Trevelyan, 
VVathne, J. Winsten, and M. Winsten; Instructors Hounhan, Mariner, and Marks; 
Research Associate Saltman 

Introduction 

The Department of Health Policy and Management is concerned with the 
allocation and management of resources to deal with public health prob- 
lems. Such problems may arise in the context of public policy decisions 
where choices must be made among various programs and policies. Ac- 
tivities must then be designed and implemented, whether the problem area 
is the health care delivery system, environmental or occupational health, 
etc. Alternatively, the problem may be set within an individual institution 
such as a hospital or community health center, or a public health agency 
where a manager must choose among competing programs and activities. 
Furthermore, in any setting, effective management is essential if objectives 
are to be achieved with the limited resources that are available. 

The Department includes a two-year master's program in health policy 
and management, two one-year master's programs in health services ad- 
ministration, and a doctoral program. The Department's faculty is interdis- 
ciplinary, including economists, political scientists, physicians, decision 
analysts, management specialists, and lawyers. 

Degrees 

Master of Science in Health Policy and Management; Master of Science in 
Health Services Administration; Master of Public Health with a concentra- 
tion in Health Services Administration; Doctor of Science; and Doctor of 
Public Health. 



Programs 

Master of Science in Health Policy and Management 

The two-year program in Health Policy and Management (HP&M) is de- 
signed to provide a foundation of professional training for managers, 
policy analysts, planners, and others who intend to devote their careers to 
working on public health problems. The program has been designed 
around four key elements: 1) a dual focus on policy and management; 2) an 
emphasis on both skills and concepts; 3) a grounding in the substance of 
public health problems; and 4) a curriculum combining academic and 
clinical activities. 

The program is based on the premise that training in an academic setting 
must be complemented by experience in real-world, problem-solving situ- 
ations. The curriculum is updated regularly and is applied to practical 
situations by means of a required summer internship program and an 
applied research program. 

Dr. Stephen Thomas is Director of the Graduate Program in Health Policy 
and Management. 

Curriculum 

The curriculum for the Health Policy and Management program has been 
tailored to reinforce the above-described philosophy. There are four impor- 
tant and interrelated elements: 

Required Core 

A set of required core courses comprise the first year of each student's 
two-year program. These core courses provide the basic analytic skills and 
knowledge needed by professionals serving in both policy and manage- 
ment roles in the health field. Subjects covered include: quantitative 
methods, particularly epidemiology (EPI 201a or 221a,b) and biostatistics 
(HPM-BIO 219b,c, 219d); essential management skills (HPM 220a-d); an 
introduction to policy analysis, including microeconomics (HPM 100a, b), 
quantitative policy analysis (HPM 211c), and political and bureaucratic 
analysis (HPM 250d); and substantive public health issues (HPM 240a). 
Students may be exempted from those core requirements in which they 
demonstrate prior proficiency. 

Summer Internship 

A required summer internship between the first and second years allows 
students to apply the skills and knowledge gained from the first year, and to 
acquire further understanding of career possibilities in the health care field. 

Flexible Second-Year Curriculum 

A flexible second-year curriculum is designed by each student in conjunc- 
tion with his or her academic and clinical advisors. Maximum flexibility is 
provided in order to allow students to pursue their own particular areas of 
interest as fully as possible. HP&M departmental courses may be sup- 
plemented by offerings in other departments within the School, and in 
some instances by courses in other schools within the University, such as 



the Harvard Business School and the John F. Kennedy School of Govern- 
ment. A special inter-university relationship also allows students to enroll 
in courses at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Since the School 
offers a variety of courses in all areas of public health, a second-year 
curriculum can be tailored to a student's particular interests and career 
objectives. 

Typically, each student's second-year program of studv concentrates on 
one of two primarv skill areas (either policv or management) and in a single 
substantive health area (such as health services, nutrition, environment, 
international health, or population). Diverse course offerings allow stu- 
dents to develop expertise in their primary area of concentration. 

Applied Research Program 

As part of their second-vear activities, students are required to participate 
in an Applied Research Program. This program includes a research project 
carried out in conjunction with a local public health organization or agency. 
Each student prepares a paper which analyzes a specific problem within the 
selected organization. 

The applied research project is conducted under the supervision of a 
clinical preceptor from the host organization and a faculty advisor from the 
School. The experience is designed to allow students to further develop and 
refine those skills most appropriate to their chosen discipline. Clinical and 
academic members of the student's project team are selected with this end 
in mind, and a weekly Applied Research Seminar allows students, clinical 
preceptors, and faculty advisors to bring together a variety of perspectives 
in a structured classroom setting. 

Curriculum Tracks 

In addition to the four basic elements described above, the program in- 
cludes curriculum tracks for physicians and dentists, and for students 
interested in environmental health. These tracks combine the basic core 
disciplines of the program with courses directed towards students' specific 
interests. The Medical Dental Track contains course work in Clinical Deci- 
sion Analysis, Principles of Clinical Trials, and others. The Environmental 
Health Track contains course work in the Political Economy of 
Environmental Health and Environmental Health Policy Analysis. All other 
students automaticallv would be enrolled in the general track, which con- 
tains course work in Health Care Delivery in the U.S.: History and Sociol- 
ogy and the Health Care Deliverv Svstem. 

Admission 

The program seeks candidates whose academic record, personal charac- 
teristics and work experience suggest intellectual competence and out- 
standing potential in the areas of health policy and management. Enroll- 
ment is limited to fifty or fewer students per year in order to allow for 
maximum interaction between students and faculty both inside and out- 
side the classroom. All applicants must demonstrate through course work 
and aptitude test performance the ability to master the quantitative and 




Dr. Young uses the case study approach in 
his class. 



Health Policy and Management 35 



analytic content of the program. Academic backgrounds in either the natu- 
ral or social sciences are equally acceptable. Applications from candidates 
who have at least one year of pertinent post-baccalaureate work experience 
in the health field are considered to be most competitive for admission. 
(Please see Degree Requirements for Admission, p. 14 and Admissions, p. 
72.) 

Deferred admissions are available for a limited number of applicants who 
demonstrate strong potential in the field but who have not had work- 
related exposure to the health care system. Students who receive deferred 
admissions status are expected to work within the health system, in a 
position approved by the program, for a minimum of one year before 
matriculating. Applicants whose preparation appears deficient in some 
area, e.g. quantitative methods, may be offered provisional acceptance, 
contingent upon the successful completion of specific course work in ad- 
vance of matriculation. 

One of the goals of the School of Public Health is to address the health- 
related problems of the underserved, both in this country and abroad. 
Accordingly, the program is particularly interested in receiving applica- 
tions from individuals whose special concerns extend to people in inner 
cities, rural areas, developing countries, and other locations where such 
problems exist. Course work in the areas of community health and inter- 
national health is available, and the program works closely with the 
Community Health Improvement Program (CHIP, see p. 66) and the 
Office of International Health Programs (see p. 65) to assist students in 
furthering their career objectives in those areas. 
Career Outlook 

The program has developed an effective job placement mechanism for its 
students, utilizing academic and clinical faculty, program alumni, and the 
resources of the School's counseling office. Additionally, a network of 
contacts has been developed with potential employers throughout the 
country and with professionals in a wide variety of executive-level pos- 
itions who have attended the School's Executive Programs in Health Policy 
and Management. Examples of positions secured by program graduates 
include: director of a community hospital; administrative director of a 
primary care center; director of a certificate of need program; analyst in a 
state regulatory agency; planner in HHS; director of a state commission on 
the handicapped; analyst in the Congressional Budget Office; and 
economist/planner with a health maintenance organization. 

Master of Science in Health Services Administration 

The one-year Master of Science in Health Services Administration program 
is designed to address the needs of individuals who have an advanced 
degree in a health or health-related field, and who wish to specialize in 
health services in the areas of health policy, planning, regulation, and/or 
management. Students are required to concentrate their studies in either 

36 / Departments 



policy or management, while at the same time attaining a basic grounding 
in the general area of health policy and management. In exceptional cases, 
applicants without a prior advanced degree, but with extensive, relevant 
policy and or management experience may be eligible for admissions. 

Dr. Alonzo Yerby is Director of the Graduate Programs in Health Services 
Administration. 
Curriculum 

The curriculum for the Master of Science in Health Services Administration 
includes a required core for all students, departmental course work in a 
student's area of concentration chosen from offerings within the Depart- 
ment, and several electives either within or outside the Department. The 
curriculum totals 40 units or more during one academic year. 

Required Core 

A total of 17.5 units comprise the required core: 

EPI 201a Principles of Epidemiology or 221a, b Epidemiology in Public 

Health (2.5 units) 
HPM-BIO 219b, c, 219d Statistics for Health Policy and Management 
(7.5 units) 

HPM 240a Toward an Agenda for U.S. Public Health (2.5 units) 

HPM 300c, d Applied Research Tutorial (5.0 units) 
With the exception of the Applied Research Tutorial, students may be 
exempted from those core requirements in which they demonstrate prior 
proficiency. The Tutorial consists of the preparation of a written report in 
the student's area of concentration, focusing on a topic of interest to both 
the student and a member of the Department's faculty. The report format 
may range from a case study to a research paper, and occasionally, depend- 
ing on the student's interests, may include field work. 

Concentrations 

Each student in the program must elect to concentrate either in the policy or 
the management area. Further information about course work required for 
either the policy or management track is available upon request to the 
Admissions Office. 

As with the required core, students may be exempted from those re- 
quirements in which they demonstrate prior proficiency. As a minimum, 
however, all students must take 15 credit units of departmental courses 
beyond the core. 

Electives 

Other than the core and concentration requirements, students are free to 
pursue elective courses of their own choosing. Elective course work may be 
chosen from offerings at the School of Public Health, other schools within 
the University, or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Typically, a 
student's electives are chosen with the assistance of his/her academic ad- 
visor, and may include courses at the Harvard Business School, the John F. 
Kennedy School of Government, and the Sloan School of Management 
(MIT). 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 
109. 

Policy I: Economic Analysis; Eco- 
nomic Analysis for Public Health; 
Economics of Health Policy; Policy II: 
Quantitative Policy Analysis; Health 
Program Evaluation; Decision Analy- 
sis and Evaluation; Seminar on Clin- 
ical Decision Analysis; Administra- 
tive Systems; Administration of 
Health Services; Personnel; Labor Re- 
lations; The Management of Organi- 
zational Design and Change; Man- 
agement Control Systems; Seminar 
on Hospital Cost Containment; Plan- 
ning in the Hospital Setting; Finan- 
cial Management in Health; Introduc- 
tion to Management Information Sys- 
tems; Advanced Financial Account- 
ing; Toward an Agenda for U.S. Pub- 
lic Health; Health Care Delivery in 
the U.S.: History and Sociology; The 
Health Care Delivery System; Health 
Systems Planning and Development; 
Design and Implementation of 
Health Care Regulation; Contempo- 
rary Issues in Health Policy; Policy 
III: Policy Implementation; Govern- 
ment and Private Funding for Re- 
search and Health Care Programs; 
Reimbursement Systems; Health In- 
surance Industry: Its Structure and 
Effects on Health Care; Evaluation of 
Quality of Health Care; Physician 
Performance: Facilitators and Con- 
straints; Public Health Law and 
Human Rights; Health Law and Pol- 
icy; Health and Social Welfare Sys- 
tems in Cross-National Perspective; 
Dental Public Health Practice; Den- 
tistry and Social Policy; Doctoral 
Seminar on Research Methods; Eco- 
nomic and Political Theory in Health; 
Applied Research Seminar; Tutorial 
Programs; and Field Work. 



Admission 

The program seeks candidates who hold professional degrees at the grad- 
uate level and have some experience in health services. 

Typical applicants to the program would be professionals in public 
health-related disciplines who expect to devote a substantial portion of 
time in their careers to health policy and/or management issues; lawyers 
who are interested in health law, patient's rights, and health planning and 
regulation; and residents in General Preventive Medicine who are primar- 
ily interested in health services and who wish to have an additional year of 
study in an academic setting beyond the one year required by the American 
Board of Preventive Medicine. 

The program is also designed to satisfy similar needs of health profes- 
sionals who do not necessarily hold an advanced degree, but who have 
eight to ten years' work experience in the health services area with a high 
degree of responsibility, and who wish to undertake academic course work 
in their area of specialization. 

All applicants must demonstrate through course work and aptitude test 
performance the ability to master the quantitative and analytic content of 
the program. Please see Admissions, p. 72. 

Master of Public Health with a concentration in 
Health Services Administration 

The one-year Master of Public Health is a School-wide program designed to 
prepare professionals for careers in public health practice. Through the core 
curriculum, the program provides a broad background in various disci- 
plines basic to public health. By concentrating in Health Services Adminis- 
tration, a student commits him/herself to further study of issues in health 
policy, planning, and/or management. Such students are provided with 
academic advisors chosen from Department faculty. 

Curriculum 

Further information on the core curriculum for the School-wide M.P.H. 
program is described on page 10 of this Register. In addition to the M.P.H. 
core requirements, students in the HSA program are expected to complete 
a minimum of 15 departmental credits. Departmental offerings are listed 
starting on page 109. Students are expected to enroll in at least 5 credit 
units of economics as part of the 15 departmental credit units. 

Elective course work may be chosen from offerings at the School of Public 
Health, other schools within the University, or the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 
Recommended Tracks 

In choosing departmental offerings, students may elect to concentrate in 
either management or policy, or to undertake course work which combines 
the two. In this regard, the Department has developed three recommended 
curriculum tracks. These tracks include both recommended courses for 
students concentrating in management, policy, or a combination, as well as 



38 Departments 



some substitutions for the M.P.H. core courses. Detailed schematics for 
each track are available upon request to the Admissions Office. 

Admission 

Applicants must satisfy the requirements for admission to the MPH 
School-wide program as listed on page 9 of this Register. All applicants 
interested in a concentration in Health Services Administration must dem- 
onstrate through course work and aptitude test performance the ability to 
master the quantitative and analytic content of the program. 

Doctor of Science 
Doctor of Public Health 

The Doctoral Program concentrates on preparing its graduates to perform 
research at the professional level. More than half the program graduates 
accept positions as faculty members in universities. Others join state or 
federal agencies or private research organizations. The degree of Doctor of 
Public Health is reserved for candidates with prior professional training. 
Dr. Frederick Mosteller is Director of the Doctoral Programs. 

Curriculum 

Required courses cover health care processes and institutions, economics, 
statistical methods, management, and formal analytic methods. Students 
select both disciplinary and substantive area majors and minors. Discipli- 
nary areas include economics, management sciences, political science, 
program evaluation and experimental design, decision sciences, and statis- 
tics. Substantive areas include disease prevention and health promotion, 
health care delivery, health resource allocation — capital and human, and 
technology assessment. A doctoral seminar is devoted to research methods. 
Doctoral dissertations comprising original research are advised by commit- 
tees of three or more faculty members. 
Admissions 

Preference is given to applicants with strong aptitude or competence in a 
quantitative discipline (demonstrated through course work, work experi- 
ence and aptitude test performance), experience in the health sector, ability 
to organize and perform independent projects, and good interpersonal 
skills. Direct admission to the doctoral program is generally reserved for 
persons with relevant graduate education. Persons without such education 
may in exceptional circumstances be directly admitted but will generally be 
referred to a master's program, from which their doctoral application may 
be made. 



Courses in conjunction with other 
departments: 

Introduction to Operations Manage- 
ment; Decision Analysis for Health 
and Medical Practices; Statistical 
Methods for Health Policy and Man- 
agement; Public Health Law and 
Human Rights; Health Planning in 
Developing Countries; Case Studies 
in Design and Management of Popu- 
lation and Community Health Pro- 
grams; Case Studies in Comparative 
Design and Management of Popula- 
tion and Health Programs; Political 
Economy of Environmental Health 
Regulation; and Environmental 
Health Policy Analysis. 



Health Policy and Management / 39 



Department of Maternal and Child Health 
and Aging 



Isabelle Valadian, M.D., M.P.H., Professor of Maternal and Child Health and 

Chairman of the Department 

Faculty 

Professors Curran and Yerby; Assistant Professors Branch, Deykin, Gardner, and 
Walker; Lecturers Dwyer and Hayes; Emeritus Professor Reed 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Lecturers and Visiting Lecturers Birchette-Pierce, DeLollis, Gold, Newberger, 
Ryan, and Stubblefield; Research Associates Benet and Butler 

Introduction 

The Department of Maternal and Child Health and Aging is concerned with 
the human life cycle, factors which affect individuals' life-long health status 
and the interventions and services needed to promote health. 

Degrees 

Master of Public Health with concentration in Maternal and Child Health; 
Master of Science in Maternal and Child Health; and Doctor of Science. 

Programs 
Goals/Curriculum 

The major objective of the Department is to provide in-depth understand- 
ing of the physical, social, and psychological determinants of health at 
various stages of the human life cycle and to promote application of this 
knowledge in health programs. Specifically, the curriculum emphasizes: 

1. the developing individual and his or her changing physical, psycho- 
logical, social, and cognitive strengths from conception to senes- 
cence within the context of family and community; 

2. the examination of those health, welfare and related services which 
are currently available and those which could be instituted to meet 
the health needs of individuals, including those with chronic ill- 
ness, handicapping or other special conditions; 

3. the roles of governmental bodies, health agencies, voluntary and 
consumer groups in the organization and delivery of health and 
social services at all levels, e.g., international, national, state and 
local; 

4. the interface of law with health and related systems which has 
varied implications for service and research at different stages of 
life; 

5. the skills in policy formulation, planning, management and evalua- 
tion of MCHA programs. 



Research 

The research of the Department involves a broad range of interests. The 
Longitudinal Studies of Child Health and Development started in 1930 have 
been expanded to investigate the patterns of growth, maturation and be- 
havioral, social and nutritional changes in an aging cohort. These data have 
facilitated the study of variables influencing health status at various stages 
of life and related adult health to child health and development. Investiga- 
tion of patterns of physical and behavioral development during childhood 
and adolescence have particular emphasis on the development of statistical 
methods for analyzing processes of growth and development, and the 
utilization of these methods in health program planning and evaluation. 

The interface between health and social well-being is a major concern of 
the Department. Data from community-wide surveys on the availability 
and utilization of child health services in western Massachusetts and in an 
urban Michigan city have been collected and are being analyzed and dis- 
seminated. Another study evaluates an intervention program designed to 
reduce the occurrence of self destructive or suicidal behavior among adoles- 
cents. 

Doctoral students' research activities represent a range of interests in the 
areas of health, development, and service delivery. The adolescent deter- 
minants of adult gynecologic health, the physical and psychological status 
of children with Downs Syndrome, the development of scoliosis, the de- 
terminants of recidivism in child abuse and the evaluation of programs for 
pregnant adolescents form the basis of recently completed or in-progress 
doctoral studies. 

Projected research endeavors by departmental faculty and students in- 
clude a study of neurological and cognitive sequelae of early infancy apnea; 
an investigation of the side effects of marital separation on school-aged 
children; and an assessment of developmental intervention of high risk 
infants. 

Admission 

Professionals with advanced degrees from health disciplines (including 
medicine, dentistry, nursing, social work, nutrition, psychology, health 
education) and other related areas such as law, education and anthropology 
are eligible for the following degree programs: 

The M.P.H. degree with concentration in MCH is a one-year program 
designed primarily for established health professionals who desire to 
broaden their knowledge of public health policy and strategies and their 
specific application to the area of maternal and child health. To be eligible 
for this degree, applicants must meet eligibility requirements specified by 
the general M.P.H. program and in addition must have had relevant prior 
experience in maternal and child health. 




Dr. Valadian'sseminargroup discussing child 
growth and development . 



Maternal and Child Health and Aging 41 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 
1 14. 

Growth and Development [; Growth 
and Development II: Advanced 
Seminar; Growth and Development 
III: Factors Affecting Growth and De- 
velopment; Primary Maternal and 
Child Health Care; Content of Mater- 
nal and Child Health Services; Pro- 
grams and Issues in Maternal and 
Child Health Services; Research Ap- 
proach to Growth, Development and 
Health of the Child; Maternal and 
Child Health in Developing Coun- 
tries; Nutrition in Child Growth and 
Development; Rural Health Services; 
Social Services for Mothers and Chil- 
dren; An Introduction to Personality 
and Cognitive Development; Health 
Care of Women; Childhood Mental 
Disorders: Public Health Perspectiv- 
es; The Elderly Person in the Health 
Care System; Tutorials; Field Study 
and Research. 

In conjunction with other depart- 
ments: 

Child Development and Social Policy 
and Human Rights in Health. 



Candidates admitted to the M.P.H. program in MCH must fulfill the 
core curriculum of the M.P.H. program described on page 10 and must 
take MCH core courses offered by the Department: MCHA 101a, 210a, 
203a, b, 204c, d and 220c. It is expected that all students in this program will 
take courses leading to an understanding of normative physical and cog- 
nitive development, of maternal and child health services and of the 
legislation supporting health and social services in maternal and child 
health. Students who wish to be excused from specific courses covering 
this material may petition the Department which will assess the student's 
proficiency in the area and may grant specific course waivers. Students 
excused from certain courses will be required to take a minimum of 12.5 
credit units in departmental offerings. 

The Master of Science degree in Maternal and Child Health (S.M. in 
MCH) is designed for students who wish to focus in depth in maternal and 
child health. The department offers both a one-year (40 credits) and a 
two-year (80 credits) program. 

Applicants eligible for the one-year program are established practition- 
ers or researchers with at least a prior master's degree in a related field 
(medicine, nursing, social work, nutrition, physical therapy, education or 
anthropology). Applicants to the two-year program are those who have at 
least a master's degree in an unrelated field (statistics, journalism, law) and 
who have little relevant experience in maternal and child health. In excep- 
tional circumstances, applicants with a prior baccalaurate degree only may 
also be accepted in the two-year master's program. 

Candidates for the one-year master's program must fulfill at least 20 
credit units in departmental offerings whereas candidates for the two-year 
program must fulfill at least 30 credit units in departmental offerings, 
including the core courses. At the discretion of the Chairman of the De- 
partment, courses offered by other parts of the University may, on occa- 
sion, be substituted to fulfill this requirement. 

Applicants to the doctoral program in the Department are required to 
have a prior advanced degree in a health field related to maternal and child 
health. Such applicants are judged on the basis of past academic perform- 
ance especially in the quantitative sciences, relevant experience, stated 
career goals, and interest in an area of research consonant with the goals of 
the Department and with the expertise of the departmental faculty. 

Career Outlook 

The master's degree prepares candidates for positions where they will be 
instrumental in initiating and reshaping public health practice at federal, 
state, and local levels assuming responsibility for advocating, formulating 
policies, organizing and administering health care services for women, 
children, youth and the aged. The doctoral program trains researchers and 
prepares professionals for academic positions. 

A limited number of fellowships may be available to master's candidates 
who are U.S. citizens and in the area of maternal and child health. 



42 / Departments 



Department of Microbiology 



M. E. Essex, D.V.M, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology and Chairman of the 

Department 

Faculty 

Professor Cairns; Associate Professors Falk and Haseltine; Assistant Professors 
Eardley, Eisenstadt, Grant, and Mullins 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Visiting Lecturers Cotter, Fiumara, Gilfillan, Grady, Modabber, Walsh, Werner, 
and Wright; Instructor Ferraro; Research Associates Azocar, Girard, Logan, Miller, 
and Sliski 

Introduction 

The Department of Microbiology is primarily involved with the biology, 
epidemiology, and immunology of infectious disease agents, especially 
viruses. Training programs leading to the Doctor of Science degree are 
emphasized but the Department also participates in the professional degree 
programs offered by the School, for those so interested. Doctoral training 
areas include basic and applied research in virology, immunology, cancer 
biologv and medical microbiology. For further information about our doc- 
toral program, please write to Dr. M. Essex, Chairman of the Department. 

A collegial atmosphere prevails among faculty and students, and stu- 
dents are encouraged to participate in the numerous seminar series and 
informal discussion groups the Harvard Medical Area has to offer. Course 
work is available in several areas of microbiology, in biochemistry and cell 
biology at the Harvard Medical School, other schools within Harvard Uni- 
versity, or at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in addition to the 
offerings of the Department and the School. 

The Department also maintains a relationship with the Massachusetts 
State Laboratory Institute, and is involved in joint research efforts with 
some of our associates at that Institute. In addition to the above research 
programs, the Department is involved in the teaching of public health 
policy and planning, especially as it relates to infectious disease. 
Degree 

Doctor of Science; there are no programs leading to the Master of Science. 
Research 

Some of the areas in which Department faculty are conducting research are: 
cellular and tumor immunology, cancer biologv and epidemiology; immu- 
nodiagnosis, immunochemistry and biochemistry of respiratory and en- 
teric viruses, environmental aspects of virology, and mutagenesis. 

Program 

Goals 

To provide training in research leading to a doctoral degree in microbiol- 
ogy, with specialization in a particular area. 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 



Critiques of Current Literature on In- 
fectious Diseases; Clinical Problems 
in Infectious Diseases; Immunologic 
Aspects of Infectious Diseases; De- 
partmental Seminar; Case Studies in 
the Epidemiology of Infectious Dis- 
ease; Virology; Advanced Cancer Cell 
Biology; Introduction to Cancer Biol- 
ogy; Tutorial Programs; and Re- 
search. 



L16. 




Dr. Cairns reviews experimental approaches to studying cancer biol- 
ogy with one of his students. 

Curriculum 

At the doctoral level, major emphasis is placed on research training in 
immunology, virology, cancer biology, and medical microbiology. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to develop strengths in related areas such as molecu- 
lar biology and epidemiology. 

During the first two years students take courses as required to establish a 
firm background in the appropriate areas. By the second year at the latest, 
the student should be introduced to laboratory research, and should be 
formulating a thesis proposal for evaluation. Each student is expected to 
demonstrate a proficiency in laboratory techniques and an ability to reason 
through a research problem before undertaking doctoral research. These 
skills can be obtained by participation in laboratory courses and laboratory 
tutorials, as well as departmental and interdepartmental student and fac- 
ulty seminars. Faculty research collaboration is underway with several 
laboratories outside the Department, and student participation in these 
programs is also encouraged. 

Doctoral students should select a specific research topic in one of the 
areas mentioned under Research soon after admission to the program. (See 
p. 14 for specific degree requirements.) 
Admission 

Prospective students should have a strong background in biology and 
chemistry. Previous training in microbiology, virology, and/or immunol- 
ogy is desirable but not necessary. Students are admitted who have a 
baccalaureate degree as well as those with graduate degrees. 

Career Outlook 

Our recent graduates have accepted research and/or teaching positions with 
public and private academic institutions, with governmental agencies such 
as National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and 
occasionally with private industry. 



44 / Departments 



Department of Nutrition 



Robert P. Geyer, S.B., S.M., Ph.D., A.M. (hon.), Professor of Nutrition and Chair- 
man of the Department 
Faculty 

Professors Antoniades, Bloch, Goldman, and Lown; Associate Professors Hayes, 
Herrera-Acena, and Thenen; Assistant Professors Franceschi, Lieberman, el Lozy, 
Mora, Owen, Verrier, and VVitschi; Lecturer Austin 
Emeriti 

Professors Hegsted and Stare 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Visiting Lecturers Gershoff and Samonds; Lecturers Huber and Nicolosi; Research 
Associates Ausman, Chu, Gallina, Graboys, Podrid, Lynch, and Super; Consultants 
Cannon and McGandv; Assistants Bruno and Gallagher 

Introduction 

The Department of Nutrition provides training and research opportunities 
in the basic science and the applied areas of nutrition with orientation 
towards problems of contemporary public health importance, including 
cardiovascular disease, obesitv, cancer, and diabetes. Other areas of nutri- 
tion concerning policy, planning, and applied interventions have been a 
long-standing interest of the Department, as have health problems related 
to nutrition in this country and in Central and South America, Africa, and 
Asia. 

Degrees 

Master and Doctor of Science; Master and Doctor of Public Health with 
concentration in Nutrition; Doctor of Science (with Epidemiology). 

Research 

The research of the Department involves various aspects of nutrition rang- 
ing from cell biology and metabolism to animal pathophvsiology, clinical 
studies, and policy planning at domestic or international levels. At the 
molecular level are studies on the regulation of cell growth by hormonal 
growth factors obtained from both human blood components and cultured 
mammalian cells, as well as the synthesis and application of perfluoro- 
carbons for blood replacement. Mechanisms of nutritional interactions 
with experimental obesity and effects of diet on lipoprotein metabolism, 
atherogenesis and diabetes are examples of nutritional biochemistry and 
pathophysiology studies in progress. 

Extensive use is made of computers both in the mathematical modeling of 
growth and in interactive dietary analysis and counseling. Other areas of 
applied research include evaluation of nutrition programs and dietary 
methodology. 

At the international level are projects concerning the effects of malnutri- 
tion on mortality, morbidity and mental and physical development. Re- 
search activities of the faculty are listed under the course number "NUT 
351-368." 




Dr. Albert Owen discussed "The Regulation 
of Amino Acid Uptake into Human Diploid 
Fibroblasts" at a seminar. 



Programs 

Goals 

The Doctor of Science degree program is designed to train highly qualified 
individuals interested in laboratory-oriented approaches to solving nutri- 
tion and metabolic problems. By utilizing a number of scientific disciplines 
and engaging in appropriate research, students learn and use the latest 
techniques in biochemistry, physiology, and related fields. The research, 
whether basic or applied, is relevant to human health. A specific doctoral 
program in Nutritional Biochemistry is available in the department; in- 
terested applicants should contact the Department Chairman for detailed 
information. The joint Doctor of Science degree in the Departments of 
Nutrition and Epidemiology furnishes thorough training in both of these 
disciplines, enabling graduates to apply sound epidemiological methods to 
an ever-increasing number of important nutritional problems. Applicants 
interested in earning the Doctor of Public Health degree in an area dealing 
with nutrition should contact the Department for information. 

Curriculum 

Students accepted to the S.D. program are required to take graduate 
courses in biochemistry, physiology, epidemiology, and biostatistics and 
the following Nutrition courses: Principles of Nutrition (NUT 201a, b), 
Departmental Seminars (NUT 204a,b/204c,d), Biochemistry and Physiol- 
ogy of Nutrition (NUT 205c, d), and Research Techniques in Nutritional 
Biochemistry (NUT 214a,b/214c,d). In addition, 5.0 units of other formal 
Nutrition courses are required for graduation. The course requirements 
for the doctoral program in Nutritional Biochemistry are the same as those 
given above, but the formal course work also must apply to one minor 
field in biochemistry and the other chosen from the other basic medical 
sciences. Research is begun during the first year, and a thesis must be 
completed within the period prescribed by the School (see p. 18). 

The joint S.D. degree with Epidemiology requires the student to take 
the courses designated for the Doctor of Science programs in the respec- 
tive departments. In addition to these courses, a minor field must also be 
selected that satisfies both departments. A satisfactory thesis dealing with 
nutrition and epidemiology must be submitted within the time limit set 
by the School. 

Students in the M.P.H. program who concentrate in Nutrition are re- 
quired to take Principles of Nutrition (NUT 201a, b), Departmental Semi- 
nars (NUT 204a,b/204c,d) and at least one other course offered by the 
Department. 

The requirements for the Dr.P.H. degree are the same as those given for 
the S.D. degree, but the candidate must hold an M.P.H. degree. 

Admission 

The laboratory-oriented S.D. degree program may be entered at either the 
master's or the doctoral level. It is highly recommended that the latter 
route be selected even by students with only a bachelor's degree. The 



46 / Departments 



Department mav in certain instances exercise its own determination as to 
which option should apply. An excellent background in chemistry, biol- 
ogy, nutrition, or some other relevant science discipline is necessary for 
admission. Admission for the joint S.D. degree requires a strong 
background in biology and mathematics. Approval by both the Depart- 
ments of Nutrition and Epidemiology is necessary. Applicants interested 
in this program should contact the Chairman of the Department of Nutri- 
tion before formally applying. Applicants for the Doctor of Public Health 
degree with emphasis in nutrition should communicate with the Depart- 
ment Chairman prior to filing an application. 
Career Outlook 

Some positions recent graduates have taken: Assistant Professor of Bio- 
chemistry at a university; Assistant Professor and Research Associate at 
schools of medicine: postdoctoral research fellows in medical centers and 
universities; Nutrition Research Director at a major food companv; nu- 
tritionist at a school of public health; director of nutrition support service in 
a medical center; communitv nutritionist for a state health project; local 
health clinic administrator; food analytical chemist for industrial firm; 
nutritionist for federal nutrition evaluation agencv; nutrition educator for 
national Tunisian institute. 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 
118. 

Principles of Nutrition; Nutrition 
Policy and Management-United 
States; Nutrition Policy and 
Management-Developing Countries; 
Departmental Seminars; Biochemis- 
try and Physiology of Nutrition; 
Nutritional Aspects of Human Dis- 
ease; Food Science and Nutrition; 
Nutrition Problems of Less De- 
veloped Countries; Research 
Techniques in Nutritional 
Biochemistry; Tutorial Programs; 
and Research. 

In conjunction with other depart- 
ments: 

Nutrition in Child Growth and De- 
velopment and Nutritional Epidemi- 
ology. 



Nutrition 47 



Department of Physiology 



John B. Little, A.B., M.D., Professor of Radiobiology and Acting Chairman of the 

Department 

Faculty 

Professors Brain, Ferris, Hornig, Little, Mead, Monson, Peters, and Tashjian; 
Associate Professors Amdur, Kennedy, D. E. Leith, Sorokin, Speizer, and Weg- 
man; Assistant Professors Baker, Banzett, Boden, Butler, Drazen, Eisenstadt, El- 
lenbecker, H. Feldman, Keyserling, Loring, Reynolds, Rice, Richardson, Schon- 
brunn, Smith, Toscano, and Valberg; Lecturers Murphy, Ofner, and Snook; 
Emeritus Professor Whittenberger 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Lecturers Arndt, Douglass, R. Feldman, Levy, and Storm; Research Associates Beck, 
Henson, Hoppin, Letz, Levenstein, Nagasawa, Parod, J. Smith, Sneddon, 
Sweeney, and Voelkel; Visiting Lecturers Landrigan and Oliver; Consultant 
McGandy; Assistant Vetrovs 

Introduction 

The Department of Physiology has research and teaching activities which 
include physiology as a basic medical science, but which extend beyond 
pure physiology to encompass a broad spectrum of environmental and 
occupational health problems. The mechanisms of action and the adverse 
health effects of chemical and physical factors in occupational and commu- 
nity settings are typical problems that have been central to the Depart- 
ment's interests. Such research provides the basis for prevention and con- 
trol; the problems are very complex and require the insights of many 
specialties. The faculty and staff of the Department reflect the multidiscip- 
linary nature of the field and include physicians, physiologists, physicists, 
engineers, toxicologists, and specialists in radiobiology and occupational 
health. Students and research fellows come with similarly varied back- 
grounds. 

Major objectives of the Department are to provide students with basic 
information on human physiology and on the relationship of human beings 
to their physical and chemical environment. These concepts in biology and 
health are examined in detail in such courses as Human Physiology, Princi- 
ples of Toxicology, Radiation Biology, and Basic Problems in Occupational 
Health and Industrial Environments. Specific research projects of members 
of the Department offer students an opportunity to gain experience in 
research and to develop a capacity for critical evaluation of research meth- 
ods. 

Degrees 

Master of Science in Physiology; Doctor of Science; Master and Doctor of 
Public Health; and Master of Occupational Health. 

Research 

The research programs include topics such as: cellular effects of ionizing 
radiation, mechanisms of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, inhalation toxi- 
cology, comparative respiratory physiology, the deposition and clearance 
of particles in the respiratory tract, and epidemiologic studies of working 

48 Departments 




populations and community populations exposed to various toxic mate- 
rials. Other research areas are the mechanical properties of lungs and chest 
wall, development of pulmonary function tests and testing equipment, and 
application of these methods to the study of respiratory disease in occupa- 
tional and community environments. The research and training programs 
in toxicology include the development and use of differentiated animal and 
human cell strains which perform organ-specific functions in culture as 
models for studies on the biochemical mechanisms of toxicant uptake and 
action as well as for the development of preventive or reparative interven- 
tions. Other research areas in toxicology include enzyme reaction mecha- 
nisms, mechanisms of tumor promotion, development of new analytic 
methodology, and behavioral toxicology. 

Programs 
Occupational Health 

Information concerning programs and degrees in Occupational Medicine 
and Occupational Safety and Health may be found on p. 62 under Educa- 
tional Resource Center for Occupational Safety and Healh. 

Pulmonary Biology 

Goals 

This program offers doctoral training in preparation for research careers in 
pulmonary biology. It is built on a public health viewpoint of the lung as a 
portal of entry and a target organ for environmental agents, and focuses on 
two aspects of organ system physiology: respiratory mechanics and respira- 
tory defense mechanisms. Also emphasized are inhalation toxicology and 
the pathology of environmental and occupational lung disease. The biology 
is broadly based, ranging from molecular and cell biology to integrated 
organismic, environmental, and comparative physiology; both normal and 
pathological physiology are included. 
Curriculum 

Intensive course work in the first two years may include physiology, 
biochemistry, histology, engineering, toxicology, radiation biology, 
statistics, epidemiology, pathology, and immunology. The latter part of 
the program consists of research under the guidance of a faculty advisor. 
Collaborative research opportunities exist in several area institutions. (See 
p. 10 for specific degree requirements.) 

Admission 

Intended primarily for students with prior degrees in the physical sciences, 
or biology with a strong physical science and mathematical component. 
Two years of residence at the School are generally required to earn the S.M. 
degree; students with prior master's degrees in related areas may earn the 
S.M. degree in one year. Terminal master's degree programs are not ordi- 
narily offered; students are expected to continue for the doctoral degree. 

Information regarding the graduate program in pulmonary biology may 
be obtained by writing Professor Joseph D. Brain, Director, 665 Huntington 
Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. 




"Policy Issues in Occupational Health" is 
discussed by Dr. Boden. 



Physiology / 49 



Career Outlook 

Recent graduates and postdoctoral fellows have taken positions in academ- 
ic, clinical, and government institutions doing basic and applied research 
and teaching in respiratory physiology and pathophysiology. 

Radiobiology 
Goals 

This program is designed to offer doctoral level training in the cellular and 
molecular effects of radiation in preparation for research careers in radia- 
tion biology and experimental carcinogenesis. 

Curriculum 

Course work during the first two years emphasizes biochemistry, cellular 
and molecular biology, virology and genetics, as well as the preparation 
needed to develop the basic skills in laboratory techniques and data 
handling necessary for undertaking original research. The latter part of the 
program involves intensive laboratory research under the guidance of a 
faculty advisor. Some areas of ongoing research in the program include the 
study of: the induction of mutations and malignant transformation in 
mammalian cells by low and high LET radiations and by chemical agents; 
radiation-induced DNA damage and repair processes at the cellular and 
molecular levels; cytogenetic effects of radiation and chemical pollutants; 
and the effects of radiation in human diploid cells from cancer-prone 
patients. (See p. 10 for specific degree requirements.) 

Admission 

Admission requirements include an appropriate background in biology, 
chemistry or physics. Although students are usually admitted into the 
master's program, they are expected to continue for the doctoral degree. A 
terminal master's program as such is not usually offered. Some students 
with prior master's or professional degrees, or with an unusually strong 
background in biology, may be admitted directly into the doctoral pro- 
gram. 

Information regarding the graduate program in radiobiology may be 
obtained by writing Professor John B. Little, Director, Laboratory of 
Radiobiology, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. A personal 
interview is strongly encouraged. 

Career Outlook 

After a period of postdoctoral fellowship, recent graduates of the program 
have primarily entered academic careers as university-based independent 
research scientists. Several graduates have entered governmental service or 
industry. 



50 / Departments 



Toxicology 
Goals 

The research and training program in toxicology provides students with 
knowledge of the health implications of environmental chemicals, their 
interactions with a variety of cellular systems, biochemical mechanisms of 
cellular toxicity, the means to identify toxic environmental chemicals and to 
prevent or reverse adverse effects where possible. 

Curriculum 

The predoctoral program in toxicology is undertaken jointly with the doc- 
toral training program of the Department of Pharmacology, a part of the 
Division of Medical Sciences at Harvard Medical School. 

The first year is usuallv devoted to course work. Courses are taken within 
the Division, at the School of Public Health, at Harvard University in 
Cambridge or at M.I.T. Students are expected to pass qualifying exam- 
inations before the end of the third semester. Thesis research to qualify for 
the Ph.D. degree should be completed in a total of four to five years in 
residence. The Ph.D. degree is granted by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences 
in Harvard University. 

Admission 

Students are admitted as candidates for the doctoral degree only. 

Students should have knowledge of organic, physical, and biological 
chemistry, general biology, physics and calculus. Deficiencies might be 
made up in the summer before entering the program. There is no language 
requirement. A personal interview is strongly encouraged. The Graduate 
Record Examination is required. 

Information regarding the graduate program in toxicology may be ob- 
tained by writing Professor Armen H. Tashjian, Jr. . Director, Laboratory of 
Toxicology, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, 
Boston, MA 02115. Applications are processed through the Admissions 
Office of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. 

Career Outlook 

Upon receipt of the doctoral degree, it is expected that most students will 
take a period of postdoctoral fellowship training prior to entering a career in 
research in an academic institution, in government or industry. 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 
119. 

Human Physiology; Principles of 
Toxicology; Pulmonary Cell Biology; 
Radiation Biology; Seminar in Toxi- 
cology; Advanced Toxicologv; 
Evaluation of Occupational Health 
Problems; Structure and Function of 
the Mammalian Respiratory Svstem; 
Tutorial Programs; and Research. 

In conjunction with another depart- 
ment: Introduction to Cancer Biol- 
ogy- 



Physiology 



51 




Dr. Paul Kivong presented statistics on 
China to his class last year. 



Department of Population Sciences 

David E. Bell, A.B., A.M., Clarence James Gamble Professor of Population Sciences 

and International Health and Chairman of the Department. 

Faculty 

Professors and Senior Lecturer Alonso, Dyck, Harrington, Keyfitz, Levins, Lewon- 
tin, Nichols, Salhanick, and Wyon; Associate Professor R. Repetto; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Berggren and Larson; Lecturers Frisch and Hareven 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Lecturers and Visiting Lecturers Chen, Guerrero, Lane, and Mcintosh; Research 
Associates Holtrop, Puccia, Seeley, and Whipple; Consultants Gamble, Goldstein, 
and C. Thomas 

Introduction 

Acting under the conviction that rapid population growth was thwarting 
efforts to provide better housing, education, nutrition, health services, and 
medical care, and that the disparity between rates of population increase 
and rates of development of human and economic resources is a crucial 
problem confronting society, the School of Public Health established the 
Department of Demography and Human Ecology in 1962 (renamed the 
Department of Population Sciences in 1969) and the Center for Population 
Studies in 1964. As the view of the role of population change in health and 
welfare has matured, increasing attention has been given to questions of 
the broader interrelations among population structure, health and welfare, 
and social change, in both developing and industrialized countries. 

Degrees 

Master and Doctor of Public Health with concentration in Population Sci- 
ences; Master of Science in Population Sciences; and Doctor of Science. 

Research 

Some research activities of the Department are: working toward a better 
understanding of the biochemical and endocrinologic mechanisms control- 
ling fertility; studying the long-term impact of demographic changes 
within the United States; examining the interactions of fertility, income 
distribution and other aspects of socio-economic development; pursuing 
research applied to aspects of family planning and the interactions of 
fertility, nutrition and infectious diseases; continuing studies leading to 
community diagnosis of causes of rates of birth, death and migrations; 
studying biological aspects of population programs; studies of ethical as- 
pects of population policies and programs; analyzing data collected in field 
studies in Haiti, including studies of mortality, morbidity, nutrition status, 
fertility and impact of programs; examining factors that might improve 
food production; and mathematical and experimental study of human 
ecosystems. 



52 / Departments 



Programs 
Goals 

There is wide variability among the programs of individual candidates, 
reflecting the diversity of the students' backgrounds, national origins, 
previous education, areas of professional concern, and career goals. Given 
these varied curriculum needs, the overall goals of the program are to 
develop sophistication in data and information management and evalua- 
tion, as well as to provide a broad philosophical perspective on problems 
and issues in the population field and on related issues of health and health 
care. 

Curriculum 

Faculty affiliated with the Department are specialists in demography, 
ethics, epidemiology, economics, sociology, ecology, genetics, and 
medicine. The formal courses and the tutorial instruction of the Depart- 
ment are planned to prepare students for effective participation in popu- 
lation programs as administrators, research workers, or educators. Pro- 
grams of study are offered in these areas: population, health, and nutri- 
tion; the design, management, and evaluation of population programs; 
the analysis of complex ecological systems; demographic analyses; and 
reproductive biomedicine. Although the Department offers a very flexible 
program, approximately half of the S.M. students are from or are primarily 
interested in health and population problems of underdeveloped coun- 
tries. (Please refer to p. 10 for specific degree requirements.) 
Admission 

Students with bachelor's degrees in biological and or social sciences, or in 
other population-related fields, are generally expected to spend two years 
in residence toward the S.M. degree. Students with prior master's or higher 
degrees, or extensive work experience, generally complete study toward 
the S.M. degree in one year. Approximately one-fourth of those who 
complete the S.M. degree enter the doctoral program. 
Career Outlook 

Some positions recent graduates have taken: director of a university center 
for population studies; principal statistician; executive secretary of an 
international committee on applied research in population; president of a 
medical services consultants group; medical director of a planned parent- 
hood association; director of a medical clinic; a programme officer for U.N. 
Fund for Population Activities; a UNFPA coordinator; a population intern 
for USA1D; and an associate programme officer in Health and Nutrition for 
UNTCEF. 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 
120. 

Introduction to Population Sciences; 
Introductory Seminar on Population 
Sciences; Student Project Design 
Seminar; Demographic Methods for 
Developing Countries: Mortality and 
Fertility; Biological Basis for Fertility 
Control; Essentials of Human Repro- 
duction; Applied Mathematical De- 
mography; The Spatial Aspects of 
Societies; Foundations of Agricul- 
tural Sciences; Population Biology; 
An Economic Approach to Popula- 
tion Polio,*; The Biological Determi- 
nants of Fecundity, Environmental 
Factors, and Population Growth; 
Comparative Analysis of Public 
Policies in Developing Countries; 
Introduction to Communitv Diag- 
nosis of Birth and Death Rates in De- 
veloping Countries; Human Ecologv; 
Applied Mathematical Demography 
Seminar; Case Studies in Design and 
Management of Population and 
Communitv - Health Programs; Case 
Studies in Comparative Design and 
Management of Population and 
Health Programs; Seminar on Ethical 
Aspects of Population Policy; Semi- 
nar on Social Policy and Population 
Issues in the Developed Countries: 
Tutorial Programs; Field Studies; 
and Research. 



Population Sciences 53 



Some of the courses offered by the 
Division of Applied Sciences are 
listed below. The corresponding de- 
scriptions are on p. 123. 
Chemistry of the Aqueous Environ- 
ment; Hydrologic Cycles; Introduc- 
tion to Environmental Microbiology; 
Introduction to Environmental 
Engineering; and Seminar: Technol- 
ogy Choice in Water Resources De- 
velopment. 

Design of Water Resource Systems; 
Seminar: Models for Environmental 
Systems Planning; Engineering Sys- 
tems for Environmental Control; 
Water Pollution Microbiology; and 
Chemical Models of Natural and Pol- 
luted Waters. 



Department of Sanitary Engineering 

Faculty 

Harold A. Thomas, Jr., S.B., S.M., S.D., Gordon McKay Professor of Civil and 
Sanitary Engineering and Joseph J. Harrington, B.C.E., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of 
Environmental Health Engineering in the Faculty of Public Health and Gordon 
McKay Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences 

Introduction 

Members of the Department participate in the School of Public Health 
through teaching interdepartmental courses such as Principles of Environ- 
mental Health and Environmental Health Evaluation and Management. The 
courses listed are offered in the Division of Applied Sciences of the Grad- 
uate School of Arts and Sciences. Graduates of engineering colleges or 
scientific schools may be admitted to the Division as candidates for degrees 
in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. They may elect appropriate 
courses in the School of Public Health as part of the program for these 
degrees. 

Further information can be obtained by writing to the Committee on 
Admissions, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Holyoke Center, 75 Mt. 
Auburn Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138. 
Degrees 

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences: Master of Science; Master of 
Engineering; and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Research 

Department members and other faculty from the Division of Applied Sci- 
ences are studying a variety of environmental problems: 

Oil pollution in the Sargasso Sea; sources, occurrence and fate of toxic 
organic substances in natural waters. 

Microbiological control of schistosomiasis; biological control of marine 
fouling. 

Robust statistical estimation of frequencies of large floods and severe 
droughts; computer and systems models in fluid management of severely 
burned patients. 

Large-scale agricultural planning models in Pakistan and India; avoid- 
ance of waste production in Brazil and other developing countries by 
choosing alternative flowsheets. 



54 / Departments 



Department of Tropical Public Health 



John R. David. A.B., M.D., A.M. (hon.), John LaPorte Given Professor of Tropical 

Public Health and Chairman of the Department 

Faculty 

Professors Chernin, Pan, Spielman. and Weller; Associate Professor Michelson; 
Assistant Professors Bover, Hoff, and Wirth; Member of the Faculty Piessens; 
Lecturer Cash; Visiting Professor Gitler 
Teaching and Research Staff 

Lecturers and Visiting Lecturers Berggren. Dammin, Fendall, Foege, Hopkins. 
Kaiser, Mata, Morrow, Moschella, Most, Mott, Neva, Popenoe, Scrimshaw, Sencer, 
von Lichtenberg. and P. Weller; Research Associates Cicconi, Piesman, Rossignol, 
and Todd; Assistant Wheeldon 

Introduction 

The health problems of the tropical regions, as in all poorly sanitated areas, 
are predominantly of an infectious and nutritional nature. The infectious 
diseases are the primary concern of the Department of Tropical Public 
Health, with emphasis given to protozoal, helminthic, and viral entities 
and to relevant arthropod and molluscan intermediate hosts. Within the 
framework of the Center for the Prevention of Infectious Diseases, the 
Department of Tropical Public Health shares with the Department of Mi- 
crobiology the responsibility for an integrated presentation of information 
on important infectious agents. 

The basic course. Tropical Public Health 201a, is designed to provide 
students in the Master of Public Health program with knowledge regarding 
major parasitic diseases, and with factual information concerning the 
epidemiology and control of selected entities of public health importance. 

The resolution of the health problems of tropical areas requires a mul- 
tidisciplinarv approach involving a considered appraisal of human re- 
sources as well as of relevant social, economic, and political factors. Thus, 
the student concentrating in the Department in preparation for a career in 
the field of international health should, in addition to departmental 
courses, acquire a broadened experience by elective work in other areas. 

Degrees 

Master and Doctor of Public Health with concentration in Tropical Public 
Health; Master of Science in Tropical Public Health; and Doctor of Science. 
Research 

The investigative program in the Department currently deals with patho- 
gens ranging from viruses to helminths. Studies on the in vitro cultivation 
and the physiology, immunology, and molecular biology of a wide variety 
of agents are in progress. Biological investigations on the molluscan vectors 
of the schistosomes comprise another area of major interest. Facilities are 
available for the training of a limited number of students at the Doctor of 
Public Health or Doctor of Science level. The doctoral degree applicant 
should, if possible, obtain the necessary medical science background prior 
to enrollment. Collaborative arrangements established with institutions in 
the tropics provide diversified opportunities for study and research over- 
Tropical Public Health 55 



Some of the courses that the Depart- 
ment offers are listed below. The cor- 
responding descriptions are on p. 
124. 

Ecology, Epidemiology, and Control 
of Important Parasitic Diseases of 
Developing Countries; Perspectives 
in Tropical Health: The Background 
for Decision Analysis; Techniques 
for Investigation of Parasitic Infec- 
tions; Clinical and Pathologic Fea- 
tures of Tropical Diseases; Principles 
of Vector Biology: Current Problems 
in Schistosomiasis; Current Prob- 
lems in Malariology; Immunology of 
Parasitic Diseases; Tutorial Pro- 
grams; and Research. 



Programs 

Tropical Public Health 
Goals 

The program has the following goals: (1) to provide students who have 
adequate training in the health sciences with the additional background 
essential for careers in research or service in developing countries; (2) to 
introduce students to the significance, recognition, and prevention of the 
major infectious disease problems of developing countries; and (3) to intro- 
duce them to aspects of human ecology and social development in such 
areas that influence public health. 

Curriculum 

Students are required to fulfill the distribution requirements for an 
M.P.H. program (see p. 10) and to take specific specialized courses offered 
by the Department; the nature of the specialized course work will depend 
on the interest of the candidate. 
Admission 

The one-year M.P.H. degree program is designed for persons with prior 
medical degrees (M.D., D.V.M., D.M.D., D.D.S.) or doctoral degrees in 
biomedical science who are interested in problems of infectious disease in 
developing countries. 

Career Outlook 

Graduates customarily direct programs dealing with the control of tropical 
diseases or with research on these entities. Posts are in the public or private 
sector and at the national and international level. A separate career oppor- 
tunity involves academic work in the area of preventive and social medicine 
with emphasis on the problems of the developing areas of the world. 

Medical and Public Health Parasitology 
Goals 

The goals of the program are: (1) to acquaint the student with recent 
advances in the area of parasitic diseases and with the present status of such 
diseases throughout the world; (2) to develop skills for evaluation of the 
current literature and of control programs; and (3) to provide adequate 
background for conducting research on these diseases, including their 
biochemical and immunological aspects. The master's program is regarded 
as preparation for doctoral study. 

Curriculum 

All students must satisfy basic course requirements in biostatistics, 
epidemiology, and tropical public health. Students usually take advanced 
course work in one or more of those disciplines, and also elect courses in 
health services, environmental health sciences, microbiology, and popula- 
tion sciences, etc., according to their interests. Students commonly cross- 
register for courses in the Harvard Medical School (e.g., immunology, 
pathology), the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and at 
M.I.T. Some of the elective work within the Department of Tropical Public 



56 I Departments 



Health may take the form of tutorials, laboratory research projects, or 
both. (See p. 14 for specific degree requirements.) 

Admission 

Students with prior M.D. degrees or doctoral or master's degrees in biologi- 
cal or medical sciences are eligible for admission to this program. The 
exceptional candidate with a strong biological background but lacking a 
master's degree will be considered. For the student without prior prepara- 
tion in pathology, biochemistry, and immunology, two years of course 
work are customarily required before the S.M. degree is awarded; students 
with sufficient prior preparation may earn the master's degree in one year. 
The majority of students go on to earn the S.D. degree and enter careers in 
research and teaching in the area of medical parasitology. 

Career Outlook 

Graduates are prepared to pursue academic or administrative careers that 
deal with the important parasitic diseases of man. 

Ecology and Control of Vectors of Disease 
Goals 

The specific educational goals of the program are: (1) to acquaint the 
student with the various arthropod and molluscan vectors of disease and to 
develop an appreciation of the biology of these organisms and the means 
for their control; (2) to prepare the student to plan and evaluate control 
programs; and (3) to develop skills with respect to identification, mainte- 
nance, and experimental procedures involving these organisms. 

Curriculum 

In addition to required courses in epidemiologv and biostatistics, partici- 
pants in the program will take courses in vector biology, entomology, 
malacology, parasitology and microbiology. Depending upon the par- 
ticular interests of each student, courses in cell biology, invertebrate 
physiology, pathology, genetics, population ecology and computer sci- 
ences may be required. Each participant will conduct a program of original 
research. (See p. 14 for specific degree requirements.) 
Admission 

Students admitted to this program normally have prior medical degrees or 
doctorates or master's degrees in biological or medical sciences. Most 
students take two years to earn the S.M. degree, although some students 
with previous education in relevant areas may earn the degree in one year. 
Almost all recipients of the master's degree continue on for the doctorate, in 
preparation for careers in teaching and research. 

Career Outlook 

The primary goal of this program is to train vector biologists for careers in 
teaching and research in universities and in governmental and interna- 
tional agencies. Graduates are expected to occupv kev positions in pro- 
grams directed toward investigation and controlling vector-borne disease. 
International health is emphasized. Thus, graduates of the program may 
engage in basic biological studies and in operational research. 

Tropical Public Health 57 



Centers, Offices, and Special Programs 



Center for the Analysis of Health Practices 

Efforts to promote equity of access or to improve the quality of health care 
have often had unexpected, and occasionally adverse, effects on the econ- 
omy, legal institutions, and even on the effectiveness and efficiency of 
medical care itself. These complex and poorly understood ramifications of 
choices in the field of health suggest that decisions ought no longer to be 
considered the province of any single discipline, and that the study of many 
problems ought not to be left to the chance association of appropriate 
experts. 

The Center for the Analysis of Health Practices (CAHP) represents one of 
Harvard University's responses to these needs. Based in the School of 
Public Health, CAHP provides a focus for the research activities of mem- 
bers drawn from the Faculties of Medicine, Government, Law, and Arts and 
Sciences, and the Departments of Health Policy and Management and 
Biostatistics of the School of Public Health. Members of the Center include 
some 25 physicians, economists, policy analysts, statisticians, sociologists, 
engineers, and systems analysts who are engaged in collaborative research 
dealing with the application of new technology to health care, medical 
economics, and the evaluation of medical interventions and primary care. 
In each of these subject areas, the investigative approach is directed at 
issues of efficacy, cost-effectiveness and public policy. In order to carry out 
its research agenda, CAHP has established collaborative relationships with 
most of the major teaching hospitals affiliated with Harvard Medical 
School, other providers of health care, insurance companies, and agencies 
of local, state and federal governments. 

The research output of the Center appears in books, monographs, serial 
publications and discussion papers. 

The Center offers a variety of means for students to participate in its 
activities. Students whose dissertations concern issues in the health sector 
may wish to use the Center as a resource during the development of their 
theses. Alternatively, a limited number of students may find opportunities 
to participate in Center-sponsored research projects during the period of 
their enrollment in the University. 

Students and faculty members who do not have a formal relationship to 
the Center may remain aware of the research activities of its members by 
attending the weekly "brown bag" workshops which serve as the major 
vehicle for communication among the members of the Center and their 
collaborators. These working seminars provide an opportunity for the 
discussion of potential projects, methodologic problems, or projects in 
progress. 

Inquiries about programs or activities of the Center should be directed to 
its staff. The Director is Howard S. Frazier, M.D.; Associate Directors are 
Peter Braun, M.D., Herbert Sherman, D.E.E., and Eleanor Druckman, J.D. 



Center for Population Studies 

The Center for Population Studies was established in 1964 under the 
leadership of the School of Public Health, as a University-wide Center to 
join scholars and scientists in different fields in a common approach to 
human population problems. The members and research associates of the 
Center are drawn from the Departments of Biology, Economics, Govern- 
ment, and Sociology; the Division of Applied Sciences; and the Schools of 
Public Health, Design, Education, Medicine, and Divinity. The Center is 
located at 9 Bow Street, Cambridge. 

In the School of Public Health, the Department of Population Sciences 
welcomes qualified candidates for the various degrees offered by the 
School. Courses open to all qualified students are also given by members of 
the Center in other parts of the University. 

The present research programs of the Center and the Department focus 
on several themes: laboratory and clinical research programs in human 
reproductive biology; economic, social, and environmental determinants 
and consequences of population change in America and other developed 
and developing countries, including public health aspects of fertility and 
the balance between populations and their resources; problems of urbani- 
zation and internal migration in both developed and developing countries; 
theories of population kinematics and dynamics and their implications for 
public policy; political and ethical aspects of population policy; historical 
population studies; population education; and the effect of nutrition and 
exercise on female reproduction. 

The Director of the Center is David E. Bell, A.M. 

Center for the Prevention of Infectious Diseases 

The Center for the Prevention of Infectious Diseases comprises the Depart- 
ments of Microbiology and Tropical Public Health. Working in close collab- 
oration, the staffs of the two Departments are concerned with the broad 
spectrum of agents that parasitize man and with their relevant arthropod 
and molluscan vectors. 

On a global basis the infectious diseases remain a primary cause of 
mortality. In the developed areas of the world, morbidity attributable to 
infectious diseases persists as a major impediment to the enjoyment of 
health. An increasing number of chronic degenerative diseases are recog- 
nized as stemming from the insults of prior infectious processes. In many 
societies, acceptance of the concept of population control awaits contain- 
ment of undue mortality induced by the infectious diseases and the con- 
sequent assurance that children who are born will have a reasonable pros- 
pect of achieving maturity. Considerations such as the foregoing empha- 
size the continuing need for the public health expert to possess knowledge 
of the rapidly changing technology of the control of infectious diseases, as 
well as basic knowledge concerning the attributes and epidemiologic char- 
acteristics of the responsible agents. 



The faculty of the Center tor the Prevention of Infectious Diseases work 
together to discharge a common responsibility- for multidisciplinary in- 
struction in the various facets of diseases of infectious etiology. The formal 
course offerings of the two Departments are designed and scheduled to 
permit the acquisition of a broad basic knowledge of infectious diseases as 
well as an introduction to specialized subject areas. For qualified ad- 
vanced students, concentration in specific areas with participation in 
collaborative or individual research is encouraged at both predoctoral and 
postdoctoral levels. The wide variety of current research projects in the 
Center permits acquisition of experience both at home and abroad, in the 
laboratory or in the field. 

The Director of the Center is John R. David, M.D. 

The Kresge Center for Environmental Health 

This Center includes the Departments of Environmental Health Sciences, 
Physiology, and Sanitarv Engineering and serves as a focus for environ- 
mental health and occupational health activities within the School of Public 
Health. Full-time faculty within the Center are physicians, engineers, phy- 
siologists, mathematicians, toxicologists, chemists, physicists, and other 
professionals. This diversity enables the staff to deal effectively with envi- 
ronmental and occupational health problems which require a multidiscip- 
linary approach. 

Specific categories in which the Center conducts research and training 
include: 

1. Occupational health and safety 

2. Air pollution health effects and control 

3. Environmental toxicology (inhalation toxicology) 

4. Radiation biology 

5. Radiological health (radiation protection) 

6. Respiratory- biology 

7. Environmental health engineering 

8. Environmental health management 

Degree programs include the Master of Public Health, Master of Science, 
Master of Occupational Health, Doctor of Science, and Doctor of Public 
Health. Formal requirements for each of these degrees are outlined in other 
sections of the catalog. Students interested in any of the above areas ordi- 
narily enroll in the School of Public Health. Students whose primary inter- 
est is in problems of water quality and water resources generally enroll in 
the Division of Applied Sciences of the Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences. 

The Director of the Kresge Center is John B. Little, M.D. 



Educational Resource Center for Occupational Safety 
and Health 

The overall objective of the Educational Resource Center is to train profes- 
sionals who will be involved in preventing occupational disease and 
injury. Employment opportunities exist in universities, governmental 
agencies, industry, and labor. The training programs are currently sup- 
ported by a grant from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and 
Health. This grant provides tuition and stipend support to qualified indi- 
viduals on a competitive basis. College-level inorganic and organic 
chemistry are required for entrance unless specific exception is made. 
Applicants presently holding positions in the fields of occupational safety 
and health who plan to return to those positions are considered particu- 
larly strong candidates for admission. For further information about any 
aspects of the five educational programs listed below, contact the Director 
of the Occupational Health Program, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 
02115. Formal requirements for the degrees are on pp. 10-18. 

Occupational Medicine 

The program in occupational medicine consists of two years of training in 
the public health disciplines relevant to the prevention and control of 
occupational disease and injury. Upon completion of this residency pro- 
gram, physicians are eligible for certification by the American Board of 
Preventive Medicine (Occupational Medicine). The first year is primarily 
didactic and leads to the Master of Science in Physiology or Master of 
Occupational Health degree. The basic course requirements are listed 
under the Master of Occupational Health degree. The second year consists 
of applying the skills learned during the first year to problem solving and 
research. Field experience includes participation in health hazard evalua- 
tions with faculty supervision; clinical rotations in which individual pa- 
tients are evaluated; and the design, execution, and analysis of data for a 
short-term research project. Specific placements are arranged in which 
residents participate in occupational health programs in industry, govern- 
ment, or labor unions. Applicants must have had one year of clinical 
training; certification by the American Board of Internal Medicine is rec- 
ommended. 

Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Safety 

The two-year master's programs in industrial hygiene and occupational 
safety are designed to help meet the demand for professional personnel 
with the skills and scientific knowledge needed to identify and control 
health problems that exist in the workplace. The core curriculum includes 
recommended and required courses dealing with basic problems in occu- 
pational health and industrial environments, environmental control, safety 
science, identification and measurement of air contaminants, air and gas 
cleaning, principles of toxicology, biomechanics and work physiology, and 
aerosol technology. 



Students specializing in industrial hygiene normally undertake intern- 
ships and research projects dealing with toxic substances, noise, radiation, 
and heat stress. Those specializing in occupational safety normally under- 
take internships and projects dealing with physical hazards or work meth- 
ods that cause traumatic or cumulative injury. Students graduating from 
either program will obtain the skills required to handle the broad range of 
environmental hazards which exist in the workplace. 

Candidates for the programs normally have a baccalaureate degree in 
engineering, chemistry, physics, or biology. Those with master's degrees 
in the above disciplines or prior training or experience in related areas mav 
be able to earn the Master of Science in Environmental Health Sciences 
degree in one year. 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Individuals with a baccalaureate degree and with advanced training in 
social or natural sciences may gain admission to a Master of Science in 
Physiology degree program in occupational safety and health. The program 
can emphasize either the epidemiologic or policy aspects of occupational 
safety and health. This is generally a two-year degree program, although an 
individual with a Ph.D. or J.D. degree may complete the program in one 
year. 

Occupational Health Nursing 

A two-year master's degree program for nurses with previous baccalaureate 
degrees in nursing is offered in collaboration with Boston University 
School of Nursing. The first year consists of didactic training in occupa- 
tional safety and health at Harvard; the second year consists of graduate 
training in nursing aspects of occupational safety and health at Boston 
University'. The Master of Science degree is granted by Boston University. 
Applications should be submitted to the Graduate Admissions Office, 
Boston University School of Xursing, 635 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, 
MA 02215. 

Office of Continuing Education 

The Office of Continuing Education was established by the School of Public 
Health in January 1982. This Office is an outgrowth of the Executive Pro- 
grams in Health Policy and Management and the Program of Continuing 
Education in Environmental Health. The purposes of the Office are to 
stimulate continuing education activities throughout the School and to 
provide leadership in planning new programs and in developing innova- 
tive approaches in this field. During the academic year 1982-83, the Office 
of Continuing Education will coordinate the presentation of approximately 
30 courses, ranging from two days to two weeks in length, with the majority 
covering three to five days. Topics addressed include managing health care 
resources, occupational health, radiation protection, air pollution control, 
meteorology, and risk benefit analysis. 

Continuing Education 63 



Lectures in the courses are presented by regular faculty members of the 
School, supplemented by outside experts for the coverage of special topics. 
Selected courses incorporate the case method, while others include labora- 
tory sessions during which participants can obtain practice in the use of the 
latest analytical apparatus and portable field measuring instruments. Each 
course offered under this program qualifies for one (1) Continuing Educa- 
tion Unit for every ten (10) hours of classroom participation. In addition, as 
an institution accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Med- 
ical Education, the Harvard School of Public Health designates that these 
courses meet the criteria for credit toward Category 1 of the Physician's 
Recognition Award of the American Medical Association. Selected courses 
have also been additionally reviewed and approved by appropriate 
environmental health related certification boards. 

Participants in the courses include physicians, health care personnel, 
scientists and engineers. Most of the participants are employed by federal, 
state and local public health and regulatory agencies, industrial organiza- 
tions, professional, trade and public interest organizations, legislative 
committees, research and development laboratories, public utilities, and 
consultant groups. During the 1981-82 academic year over 500 professional 
personnel attended courses presented under this program. A partial list- 
ing of courses scheduled for presentation during the 1982-83 academic 
year is shown on p. 97. Additional information can be obtained from the 
Office of Continuing Education, Harvard School of Public Health (Tele- 
phone: 617: 732-1171). The Director of the Office is Dade W. Moeller, 
Ph.D. 

Office of Health Policy Information 

The Office of Health Policy Information is a resource center for journalists, 
government officials and others, designed to facilitate access to the Univer- 
sity's wide-ranging resources in health policy analysis and research. It 
provides a mechanism for synthesizing and communicating available in- 
formation in a manner that is timely and relevant to the needs of journalists, 
legislators, academic, corporate and labor leaders, and others involved in 
the consideration of health policy matters. The chief aim of the Office is to 
make a true public resource of the wealth of experience and information 
available within the University. 

Current activities include the publication of a series of background re- 
ports analyzing health policy issues, a program of Ivan F. Boesky Visiting 
Fellowships for journalists, and a monthly colloquium series, the Health 
Policy Forum. The reports are designed to keep key individuals abreast of 
important developments in health policy research and analysis. The fellow- 
ships provide distinguished medical and science reporters with the oppor- 
tunity to spend six weeks in residence at the School while conducting 
intensive research. The Forum provides an opportunity for legislators, 
agency heads, health care providers, and corporate and labor leaders to 



discuss their views on health and science policy issues with an audience 
drawn from this state's academic, legal, political, consumer, health profes- 
sional, corporate, and labor communities. 

The Office of Health Policy Information is directed by Jay A. Winsten, 
Ph.D. 

Office of International Health Programs 

The Office of International Health Programs provides advice both to foreign 
and to American students with interests in international health in the 
selection of appropriate programs and courses, and coordinates activities 
within the School that are relevant to international health. The School 
provides opportunities for preparation for careers in teaching, research, 
and service in international health, with particular emphasis on problems 
of health in developing countries. The School does not offer degrees in 
international health per se, but in the various public health disciplines, 
adapted to meet the needs of international health students. Courses are 
available to provide general background and understanding of interna- 
tional issues, skills and knowledge of health policy, planning, program 
design and management, and the relevant aspects of infectious diseases, 
nutrition, maternal and child health, population, etc. Various programs 
within the School, in conjunction with related course offerings in other 
divisions of Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, offer students a broad background for future careers with interna- 
tional agencies, mission groups, philanthropic foundations, and foreign 
governmental and academic institutions. Cross-registration opportunities 
are available for students interested in medicine, economics, public admin- 
istration, education, anthropology, government, social relations, and re- 
lated subject areas appropriate to particular regions of the world. (Students 
may also cross-register for courses in foreign languages, but may not 
receive credit for such courses toward degrees being earned at the School.) 

Faculty members active in international health programs have had exten- 
sive experience in countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, 
Asia, and the Middle East. They are drawn from various departments and 
schools throughout the University, giving international health an inter- 
departmental and interdisciplinary orientation. Students at the School of 
Public Health come from more than 40 different countries, and usually 
represent the whole range of public health disciplines. The exchange of 
knowledge between students provides an additional dimension to the 
learning experience. 



Some of the courses with particular 
relevance to international health are 
listed below. (Refer to appropriate 
corresponding descriptions.) 

ID 209 Health Services in Developing 
Countries; HPM-POP 262 Health 
Planning in Developing Countries; 
NUT 210 Nutrition Problems of Less 
Developed Countries; MCHA 206 
Maternal and Child Health in Devel- 
oping Countries; POP 216 Compara- 
tive Analysis of Public Policies in De- 
veloping Countries; POP-HPM 263 
Case Studies in Design and Manage- 
ment of Population and Health Pro- 
grams; TPH 201 Ecology, Epidemiol- 
ogy, and Control of Important Parasi- 
tic Diseases of Developing Areas. 



International Health Programs / 65 



The Community Health Improvement Program 

The Community Health Improvement Program is a community service 
component of the Harvard School of Public Health which complements 
academic programs and courses at the institution. The objective of CHIP is 
to effect improvement in the health of communities by developing, imple- 
menting and evaluating innovative, community-based public health 
strategies in conjunction with community agencies. 

Students accepted in the program receive 5 credits per term for a combi- 
nation of community internships and participation in community health 
seminars. CHIP addresses four issue areas: 1) environmental and occupa- 
tional health, 2) housing, 3) nutrition, and 4) primary care for low-income 
populations. 

The service goals of CHIP are fulfilled by students and by CHIP staff who 
directly assist community agency personnel in problem-solving efforts 
aimed at improving the equity, efficiency and effectiveness of health serv- 
ice delivery, and improving the utility of policy-relevant information and 
evaluation techniques. 

Finally, CHIP demonstration and research projects are guided by more 
general needs for new public health knowledge and understanding. These 
projects are developed by CHIP staff, faculty members associated with 
CHIP, and by students. 

CHIP is currently operating in the sixth year of a renewable grant from 
the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. J. Larry Brown, Ph.D., is the Executive 
Director and Principal Investigator. 

Interdisciplinary Programs in Health 

The primary objectives of Interdisciplinary Programs in Health (IPH) are to 
enlist scholars from the natural and social sciences in finding new ways to 
deal with the critical health problems of today's society and to attract and 
train for health fields young and midcareer people with strong backgrounds 
in a natural or social science. 

IPH is designed to bring to health problems the knowledge, skills, in- 
sights and analytic techniques of a variety of disciplines. It is a 
University-wide program, based at the School of Public Health. Members 
of the Faculties of Arts and Sciences, the John F. Kennedy School of Gov- 
ernment, Law, Medicine and Business participate in IPH. 

IPH presently focuses on environmental health with particular emphasis 
on issues of both science and public policy related to chemicals in the 
environment. 

Over 40,000 chemicals are currently in production and more than 500 
additional ones are introduced each year, many of them biologically active. 
The problems raised by these chemicals provide the principal emphasis of 
IPH. The studies range from laboratory studies of biochemical effects at the 
cellular level to risk assessments and policy analyses of the regulatory 
process. Individual programs reflect the interests and wishes of partici- 
pants. 

66 / Centers, Offices and Programs 



Participants leave IPH prepared to work on health problems in federal, 
state and local governments, in industry and in research and, in some 
instances, to launch programs at other universities. 

It is not a degree granting program. 

The Participants 

IPH provides opportunities for: 

1. Promising graduates of advanced degree programs in the natural or 
social sciences seeking preparation for careers in which their talents 
can be applied to environmental health-related problems, either 
through fundamental or applied research or through service. 

2. Senior scientists and scholars who have made significant contri- 
butions in a discipline and now wish to apply their discipline to 
environmental health-related problems. 

3. Individuals from government or industry who have been involved in 
problems of environmental health and regulation and wish to 
broaden their background and perspective. 

In addition, IPH seeks to create new cooperative links among scholars 
within Harvard University as they work on problems relating their fields to 
applied health research. 

The program has several components. First, research may be done indi- 
vidually, in collaboration with existing research groups, or with new inter- 
disciplinary teams. Second, seminars and working groups explore particu- 
lar problems and develop papers and monographs. Third, Fellows and 
Visitors meet together regularly, joined^by members of the Harvard faculty 
and distinguished guests, to exchange experiences and to discuss impor- 
tant issues related to health. 

IPH Fellows 

Postdoctoral fellowships are awarded for terms of one or two years, as 
appropriate, and may be renewable for a third year. 

Fellows are chosen from the natural sciences (chemistry, biology, bio- 
chemistry, physics and mathematics), the quantitative analytic areas 
(statistics, operations research, engineering, computer science, etc.) and 
the social sciences (economics, sociologv, public policy, law, management, 
etc.). 

Those selected will devote their initial period to orientation, exploration 
of opportunities and selection of projects and advisors. Experimental 
facilities will be made available in the laboratories of existing research 



groups. It is expected that during the term of a Fellowship a substantial 
investigation or analysis will be completed. 

For further information on admissions requirements, contact: Dr. 
Donald F. Hornig, Director. 

Visiting Scientists and Scholars 

Visitors may be on leave from universities, industry, or public interest 
organizations. If stipends are required from IPH they will be adjusted to 
individual circumstances and the availability of other support to the appli- 
cant. Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae, a list of publications, a 
proposal for research or study to be undertaken in IPH and a statement of 
the relation of IPH to their career objectives. 



68 / Centers, Offices and Programs 



General Information 



History of The Harvard School of Public Health 

Professional education in public health had been steadily expanding in 
Harvard University for more than two decades before the actual founding of 
the School in 1922. Its gradual development was characterized by certain 
important steps, the first of which was the establishment, in 1909, of the 
Department of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene in the Medical School — 
the first such department in the United States. The degree of Doctor of 
Public Health was first conferred in 1911. In that year a Department of 
Sanitary Engineering was established in the Graduate School of Engineer- 
ing. In 1913, the Department of Tropical Medicine and, in 1918, the Divi- 
sion of Industrial Hygiene, with clinical and laboratory facilities, were 
organized in the Harvard Medical School. 

Also in 1913, the Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of Technology School 
for Health Officers was formed under the joint management of Harvard 
University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This School 
operated until the fall of 1922, when it was superseded by the Harvard 
School of Public Health, made possible by an endowment for this purpose 
from the Rockefeller Foundation. 

In the early years of the School's operation, several of its departments 
functioned as joint departments with counterparts in the Medical School, 
sharing facilities, faculty, and budgets. In 1946, the School was separated 
administratively and financially from the Medical School and became an 
autonomous unit of Harvard University. It continues to cooperate with the 
Medical School in teaching and research, and has also developed close 
associations with other divisions of the University, particularly the Grad- 
uate School of Arts and Sciences, the John F. Kennedy School of Govern- 
ment, and the Graduate School of Business Administration. 

The School provides graduate education to prepare people for careers in 
the practice of public health and for academic and research careers in the 
public health sciences, as well as mid-career education. It offers the degrees 
of Master and Doctor of Public Health, Master and Doctor of Science, and 
Master of Occupational Health. 

Location and Resources 

The main buildings of the School are the Health Sciences Laboratories at 665 
Huntington Avenue, and the Sebastian S. Kresge Educational Facilities 
Building at 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston. These buildings are near the 
Harvard Medical and Dental Schools; the Countway Library of Medicine; 
the Children's Hospital Medical Center; the Beth Israel Hospital; the 
Brigham and Women's Hospital; and other Harvard-affiliated hospitals. 
The School's Center for Population Studies has an office in Cambridge. 




A library tour is part of the School's orienta- 
tion program. 



Health Sciences Computing Facility 

Computing and data processing resources are available to students through 
the Health Sciences Computing Facility (HSCF), which is operated by the 
School of Public Health. A staff of computer programmers and analysts 
assists researchers and students from all of the Harvard Medical Area 
institutions in using the computer as a tool for analyzing data, for doing 
extensive numerical calculations, and for acquiring, maintaining, and pro- 
cessing large data bases. 

HSCF is equipped with five computer systems, four of which are used 
interactively in a time-sharing mode and one which is used in a batch 
processing mode. Remote batch processing is accomplished by a high- 
speed telephone link to the ITEL AS/7031 computer at the Harvard Comput- 
ing Center in Cambridge. Remote interactive computing is provided by 
telephone links to computers at the Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, the 
Harvard Computing Center, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
and Dartmouth College. 

HSCF offers computing capability for School programs using a VAX 
11/780, a VAX 11/750, and a PDP 11/70, both running under the UNIX 
operating system, and a PDP 11/70 running under the MUMPS operating 
system. Over one hundred simultaneous users can be accommodated. 
Teleprinter and video terminals are located in the School to allow students 
access to any of these computers. Students also use an IBM batch proces- 
sing system which features a number of statistical packages including 
SAS, SPSS, and BMDP. Languages available at HSCF include Basic, For- 
tran 77, PL/1, MUMPS, Pascal, and C. 

HSCF staff participate in several computing courses given by the De- 
partment of Biostatistics. In addition, HSCF offers short courses on specific 
languages, packages, and specialized medical and health data bases. Stu- 
dents who have had computing experience may enroll in special tutorials 
(Biostatistics 313a,b,c,d). The Acting Director of the HSCF is Dr. Marcello 
Pagano. 

Libraries 

The library needs of the School are served principally by the Francis A. 
Countway Library of Medicine, located at 10 Shattuck Street. The Count- 
way Library combines the resources and services of the Harvard Medical 
Library and the Boston Medical Library. Among libraries serving medical 
and health-related schools, it is the largest in the country, with recorded 
holdings of more than 460,000 volumes and 4,800 periodicals. The Count- 
way Library also has extensive collections of historical materials, dating 
from the fifteenth century. Its history of medicine department provides 
modern facilities for the use of these books and other rarities. 

All members of the University may borrow from the Harvard College 
library at Cambridge. Messenger service is provided daily between the 
college library, various other Harvard University libraries, and the Count- 
way Library. Some departments within the School also maintain their own 



70 / General Information 




The Computing Facility is used extensively by students and faculty. 



libraries. The Boston Public Library, libraries of the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, and other libraries of the Boston area add to the total book 
and periodical resources available to students. 

Other Resources 

Students at the School may enroll in courses in other faculties and depart- 
ments of Harvard University, e.g., in the natural sciences, public 
administration, economics and other social sciences, statistics, and medi- 
cal sciences. Many graduate courses at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts Uni- 
versity are also open to students at the School. Students will generally be 
granted credit for such courses toward degrees being earned at the School 
of Public Health, with the exception of courses in foreign languages. 
Credit granted for cross-registered courses may not exceed one-half of the 
credit units required for the degree in question. 

The School maintains a close association with a wide variety of health, 
medical care, and welfare organizations in Massachusetts and elsewhere. 
The facilities of hospitals and certain other institutions adjacent to the 
School are available to qualified students. Other local, national, and inter- 
national health facilities provide opportunities for observation and special 
studies, and members of their staffs are available to assist in the School's 
educational program. The State Laboratory Institute of the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health offers opportunities for qualified students to 
obtain experience in laboratory methods pertinent to public health. 



Admission 



Application for Admission 

Application forms for admission to all degree programs and for special 
student status can be obtained from the Admissions Office, Harvard School 
of Public Health, Room G-4, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 
(telephone 617-732-1030). Applications for admission are generally ac- 
cepted for the fall term only because of the sequencing of courses. 

Applicants must submit the following for consideration by the Commit- 
tee on Admissions and Degrees: (1) a completed application form; (2) 
transcripts of academic records at college, graduate schools and/or profes- 
sional schools, with official certification of degrees conferred; (3) letters of 
recommendation from at least three people who are well acquainted with 
the applicant's previous academic work and experience. In addition, the 
Graduate Record Examination must be taken within the last five years by 
certain applicants, as noted in the Degree section at the beginning of this 
Register. Applicants may apply to one degree program and one specialty 
area only. 

An application fee of $30, which is not refundable, must accompany the 
application in the form of a check drawn on a bank in the United States, a 
postal money order, or an international money order payable to the Har- 
vard School of Public Health. 

In addition to fulfilling the specific requirements for admission to a 
degree program, applicants must satisfy the Committee on Admissions and 
Degrees as to their ability to undertake advanced study at a graduate level. 
The final decision as to the admissibility of an applicant rests with the 
Committee. 

Admitted applicants submit a $100 tuition deposit when confirming 
admission. This deposit is credited to the fall term bill and is not refunded if 
the student fails to register. 

The School is unable to accept all who are eligible for admission. There- 
fore, persons who wish to be considered for admission are urged to submit 
their applications by February 1 but no later than March 1 prior to the 
academic year in which they wish to enroll. 

Admission of a candidate is for a particular year; if enrollment at that time 
is not possible, reapplication is necessary and will be considered on the 
same competitive basis as a new application. Exceptions to this must be 
approved by the Committee on Admissions and Degrees. 

As a matter of policy, Harvard School of Public Health does not discrimi- 
nate among applicants and students in admissions, educational policies, 
scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other programs on the 
basis of race, religion, sex, national origin, color, creed, handicap, age, 
sexual orientation, marital or parental status, or status as a Vietnam-era or 
disabled veteran. The School encourages women and members of minority 
groups to apply for admission. Increasing numbers of students with dis- 
abilities are enrolling at Harvard and are participating in a wide range of 

72 / General Information 



programs and activities. Every effort will be made to meet special needs. 
There are, however, no separate academic programs for either the physi- 
cally handicapped or for students with learning disabilities; all enrolled 
students undertake the same program. The Assistant Dean for Student 
Affairs has been designated to assist handicapped students and employees 
in adapting to life at the School. 

Foreign Students 

Language Proficiency 

Applicants from countries in which the language of instruction is not 
English must satisfy the Committee on Admissions and Degrees as to their 
ability to speak, read, write, and understand the English language compe- 
tently. Only students who have shown evidence of academic excellence and 
who can understand rapid, idiomatic English and can speak, write and read 
English with a high degree of facility should apply for admission. Students 
should be advised that they may be required to attend ten or more classes 
each week and to write papers and frequent short examinations. The School 
requires that all students maintain a minimum grade average of B— (grade 
point average 2.70) for graduation, and some departments and programs 
have more restrictive standards. No allowance is made for students whose 
English is not sufficient for these demands; therefore, any deficiency must 
be made up before admission. If a student completes all required course 
work but does not have a grade point average (GPA) of 2.70, the student will 
not be permitted to receive a degree. 

The School requires that foreign applicants obtain a satisfactory score 
(ordinarily 550 or better) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL). The test is administered four times a year at centers throughout 
the world. Applicants are advised to take this test as early as possible in the 
admissions process. Information concerning the test may be obtained by 
writing to the Test of English as a Foreign Language, Box 899, Princeton, 
New Jersey 08540. Applications will not be considered without documentation 
of English proficiency satisfactory to the School. 

Financial Certification 

The School has adopted the following policy regarding foreign nationals 
who are applying for admission from outside the United States. An appli- 
cant whose financial support is not guaranteed by an official U.S. agency or 
foundation must submit evidence satisfactory to the School that he or she 
will have sufficient funds available in U.S. currency to pay the expenses for 
the full period of his or her academic program, and that he or she is 
permitted to exchange or export these funds. Certification of adequate 
financial resources must be received by the School before the immigration 
form needed to obtain a visa to enter the United States can be issued. 
Foreign students who are wholly supported by personal funds will be 
required to have adequate funds to cover the cost of tuition in an escrow 
account in a U.S. bank before the immigration form will be issued. 

Foreign nationals admitted to the School and already residing within the 
United States will also be required to submit satisfactory evidence of 

Admission / 73 



sufficient funds to cover their expenses for the full period of their academic 
program. Such students will not be permitted to register at the School 
unless they have adequate funds to cover the cost of tuition in an escrow 
account in a U.S. bank. 

An estimate of living expenses in the Boston area may be found in the 
section entitled "Living Expenses" on p. 88. 

Academic Credentials 

Before foreign students are permitted to register, the School must receive 
official sealed transcripts of all academic records presented for admission. 
Photocopies of original transcripts or diplomas are accepted only if properly 
notarized by U.S. Consular officials. 

Employment 

Foreign students admitted to study programs at the School of Public Health 
who hold M.D. degrees and who will be holding either an F-l or J-l visa 
under the sponsorship of Harvard University will not be permitted to 
accept any employment for which an M.D. degree is a prerequisite while in 
this country under the sponsorship of the University. 

J-2 work permits are not automatically granted for spouses of students. 
Spouses should not expect to receive such a permit during the first six 
months or even a full year after they enter the country. 

Hospital Insurance 

All nonimmigrant foreign students are required to enroll in the Harvard 
Blue Cross Blue Shield student insurance plan. There can be no exceptions 
to this requirement. More information about the plan is included in the 
section, "Registration and Tuition." 

All inquiries and communications regarding admission should be ad- 
dressed to the Admissions Office at the address given. 

Degree Candidates 
Full Time 

Credit units are assigned on the basis of the total amount of time required 
by a course, both in class and outside of class. Twenty credit units consti- 
tute a full program for one term, and a student must take a minimum of 40 
credits for the year to be certified as full time. A full-time student must take 
a minimum of 15 credits per term and a minimum of 5 credits per period. A 
full-time student may register for no more than 25 credit units per semester 
unless permission is obtained from the Committee on Admissions and 
Degrees. 

Part Time 

Students may register as part-time degree candidates with the approval of 
the Committee on Admissions and Degrees. Ordinarily this requires 
half-time attendance; however, full-time full tuition requirements for the 
degree must be met (see tuition and registration guidelines, p. 85). A 
one-year program may be completed in two academic years, a two-year 
program in three academic years (one year full time and two years at half 

74 / General Information 



time. Students in a two-year program desiring any other credit hour 
program arrangements must submit an application to the Committee on 
Admissions and Degrees for approval). Ten credit units per term consti- 
tute a regular program for half-time students. Half-time students may 
register for no more than 12.5 credit units per term. 

Requirements for Nondegree Status 
Courtesy Students 

Persons holding Harvard Corporation appointments (of at least half-time 
teaching faculty) are permitted to enroll in courses at the School with the 
permission of the instructor and the Registrar. Harvard employees should 
consult the Personnel Office about the provisions of the Harvard Tuition 
Assistance Plan. Employees from the Harvard teaching hospitals participat- 
ing in tuition plans should consult the Registrar about the availability of 
space in courses of interest to them. Courtesy students may take a 
maximum of five credits per semester. In courses with restricted enroll- 
ment, preference is given to degree candidates. Course fee payment is not 
refundable. 
Special Students 

The School may accept a few students who are not degree candidates. 
Procedures and requirements for the admission of such students are the 
same as for degree candidates. Admission of special students to courses is 
subject to availability of space and the permission of the instructor. Candi- 
dates should specify on the application form the courses they plan to take. 
Admission as a special student carries with it no commitment to accept the 
applicant as a degree candidate and is limited to one academic year. Special 
students who wish to be admitted to degree candidacy must reapply and 
will be considered on the same basis as other applicants for admission. 
Special students are not admitted only to audit courses. Special student 
status is governed by the same policies that apply to all matriculated 
students, but those enrolled less than full time are restricted to courses at 
HSPH. 

After admission to degree candidacy, students may petition the Com- 
mittee on Admissions and Degrees to count toward academic require- 
ments courses taken as a special student or courtesy student (i.e., while in 
nondegree status). Permission may be granted if the courses fit into the 
student's academic program. Students must still complete full credit units 
for the degree. Tuition credit is not given for these courses, and students 
who are granted such permission must still meet the tuition requirements 
for the degree. (See p. 85 for tuition guidelines.) 



Nondegree Status / 75 



Registration 



General Information 

The Academic Year 

The academic year is divided into two terms. In the School of Public Health 
the fall term begins in mid-September and the spring term begins in late 
January or early February. Each term is divided into two periods: "a" and 
"b" in the fall term, and "c" and "d" in the spring term. Between the terms, 
in January, a week of field work and special projects is called "e" period. 
The Academic Calendar which gives term dates, recess periods, holidays, 
etc., is printed in the front of this Register. 

Official Notices 

It is important that each student keep informed of all official notices which 
are posted on the Office of the Registrar bulletin boards located on the 
G-Level of the Kresge Building. 

Registration 

Registration ordinarily occurs the week before the Monday on which fall 
term begins. Registration for new students in the spring term occurs on the 
Monday before the Wednesday when the term begins. Continuing stu- 
dents register in the spring term by filing their study cards by the appropri- 
ate deadlines given in the Academic Calendar. Late registration may be 
accomplished (with a late fee of $20) up to the last day to register in a given 
term as specified in the Academic Calendar. 

All foreign students who are registering at the School of Public Health 
must report to the Harvard International Office, Holyoke Center, 1350 
Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA, at the beginning of each aca- 
demic year or the beginning of the spring term if not registered for the 
preceding fall term. There they must present their passports and entry 
permits or other evidence of their immigration status. This requirement 
applies to all students who hold an F-l student visa, a J-l exchange visitor 
visa, or permanent resident status. 

Every student who is a degree candidate is expected to register until the 
requirements for the degree are fulfilled or until degree candidacy is termi- 
nated. Every resident student, whether full time or part time, must register 
in person at the beginning of each term. Doctoral candidates doing ad- 
vanced work may petition the Committee on Admissions and Degrees to 
register with nonresident status. Since nonresident status is ordinarily 
considered less than half time, students in this category automatically fall 
into loan repayment and must make special arrangements for continuation 
of health insurance, as they are not eligible for the regular Harvard plans. 
Foreign students who wish to study as nonresidents but within the U.S. 
may petition for full-time status in order to maintain visa requirements. 

Each student must file in person a study form and course cards, approxi- 
mately one and one-half weeks after the first day of classes. In the fall term, 
new students are given additional time to file. Students who sign up for 
courses listed both at HSPH and other faculties must register for the HSPH 

76 / General Information 



section. Before submitting study cards, a student should visit classes and 
consult with her/his advisor, who signs the study card, to decide on a 
definite program. Students who hand in late study cards will be charged a 
$15 late fee. 

Since the filing of study cards is considered an official part of registration 
for a term, failure to file a study card by the last day to file in that term may 
result in cancellation of registration. 

Courses may be dropped from the schedule at the discretion of the 
instructor if less than five students enroll. 

Petition to Change Courses 

After a study card is filed, all changes in courses, whether within HSPH or 
by cross-registration, must be made by petition. Official drop/add forms 
include space to change grading options and are available in the Registrar's 
Office. A $10 fee is charged for each petition filed regardless of the number 
of changes on a single petition. Change petitions will be accepted by the 
Registrar's Office up to 3:00 P.M. on the date of the published deadline. 
After that date students must submit a formal petition to the Committee on 
Admissions and Degrees. Changes cannot operate retroactively. 
Cross-Registration 

Students may take courses in other faculties of Harvard University, at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Fletcher School of Law and 
Diplomacy at Tufts University. Students are advised that dates of deadlines 
for cross-registration and for beginning of classes vary from school to school 
(MIT, the Business School and Law School begin fall classes at least one 
week earlier than the School of Public Health), sometimes making it dif- 
ficult to coordinate registrations. It is important to consider the desirability 
of cross-registration in light of two factors. First, that some schools pattern 
the length and activity of their classes much differently than the School of 
Public Health. At the Business School, for example, classes meet intensively 
for several hours at a time instead of meeting in several one- or two-hour 
sessions per week. This may interfere with a student's ability to attend 
classes at HSPH. Second, commuting time to all but the Medical School may 
be as long as 45 minutes each way in winter, so that a total commitment of 
three hours may be required merely to attend a one-hour class. A student 
should discuss desirability and feasibility of cross-registration with his/her 
advisor. 

Credit granted for cross-registered courses may not exceed one-half of the 
credit units required for the degree program of the student. Detailed in- 
structions and cross-registration petitions are available at the Registrar's 
Office. Petitions must be filed early in each term, whether the course is 
being taken for credit or on an auditing basis. Students should check 
instruction sheets and the calendar for deadlines. (Note: Students should 
avoid visiting the Registrar's Office in another faculty on the day of that 
School's initial registration.) HSPH students who drop C-R courses should 
do so by filing standard drop/add forms in the HSPH Registrar's Office by 
the deadline published by the appropriate faculty. Drops will not be ac- 
cepted after such deadlines. 

Registration / 77 



Grades for C-R courses are transferred from other faculties according to 
their grading systems and not those of HSPH. Individual instructors may 
not determine grading options for cross-registered students but must con- 
form to their faculty's official regulations. Students who cross-register are 
bound by the rules and regulations of the respective faculties regarding 
grades, examination schedules, make-up examinations, and incomplete 
work. These regulations are often very different from those at HSPH, and 
students with questions should consult with the Registrar of the faculty 
involved. Degree candidates are urged to check the examination schedules 
of cross-registered courses to avoid possible problems of late reporting of 
grades to HSPH faculty for the degree lists. Some Law School courses, for 
example, give examinations at so late a date that grade returns are not 
possible for HSPH degree candidates. 

Undergraduate-level courses taken by cross-registration may not be 
counted toward a degree at HSPH. Credit will not be granted for 
undergraduate-level courses. Part-time special students at HSPH may not 
cross-register. 

Tutorials 

All tutorials receiving degree credit at HSPH must be taken with the 
permission, and under the supervision of an HSPH faculty member. Stu- 
dents file tutorial forms giving descriptions of the course content, hours 
required, and credit to be awarded when they file study plans. Students are 
expected to complete two hours of work per week throughout the term to 
receive one unit of credit. 

Audited Courses 

Courses may be audited at the discretion of an instructor. No credit is given 
and no audited courses appear on permanent records or transcripts. Some 
HSPH courses exclude auditors. 

Radcliffe Seminars and Harvard Extension School Courses will not re- 
ceive degree credit at HSPH. 

Withdrawal and Leave of Absence 

Students wishing to withdraw must notify the Registrar and their depart- 
ment in writing and schedule an exit interview with the Director of Finan- 
cial Aid and the International Students' Office where appropriate. 

Students wishing to take a leave of absence must file a petition using a 
form available in the Registrar's Office which is signed by the advisor and 
department chairman. The Committee on Admissions and Degrees ordi- 
narily grants leaves of absence for a maximum of two terms. 

Students planning to petition for a leave of absence should make an 
appointment with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. 

Tuition is prorated according to the calendar dates published on page 84. 
The effective date of a withdrawal will be the date the letter of withdrawal is 
filed with the Registrar, or a future date, if so requested in the letter by the 
student. For students granted a leave of absence, tuition is charged to the 
end of the tuition period in which the student is granted the leave of 
absence. The deadlines for leaves and withdrawals from the School without 

78 ' General Information 



becoming liable for payment of tuition are given in the Academic Calendar. 
A student who fails to register by the last day to register in a term will be 
automatically withdrawn unless a leave of absence has been approved. 
Students who withdraw must apply for re-admission. Students who with- 
draw after the last meeting of a class will be considered registered for the 
entire course and the grade will be recorded. Blue Cross-Blue Shield health 
payments may not be prorated but must be paid by the term. 
Notification of Grades 

Grade reports for the fall term are available in the Registrar's Office at the 
end of February. Spring grade reports are mailed to permanent addresses at 
the end of June. Xo grades are given to students either by telephone or in 
person until all grade reports are prepared. Students who wish to know 
their grades immediately after a course ends may leave a stamped, self- 
addressed postcard with their instructor or hand it in with the bluebook in 
courses giving final examinations. 

Transcripts 

Official transcripts may be ordered by filling out a form in the Registrar's 
Office. The first copy is free, subsequent copies are SI. 00 each. Students 
should allow three to five working days for processing transcript orders. 
Transcripts given directly to students are stamped "Issued to Student," and 
anyone requesting records should check to be sure other institutions accept 
transcripts sent by someone other than the Registrar. 

If a student leaves the School with outstanding financial obligations to 
the University, transcripts are sent directly to the student and not to third 
parties. Such transcripts carry notations "Issued to Student" and "Stu- 
dent's Financial Obligations to the University Have Xot Been Met." 

Student Addresses 

All students must give their local address at registration and must keep the 
Registrar's Office informed of any changes in their local address. 

ID Cards 

Students are issued official Harvard University identification cards for use 
throughout the Cambridge community to gain access to libraries and class- 
room buildings. Since these cards are often used as general identification 
for cashing checks, it is essential to take precautions against loss. Replace- 
ments may be ordered through application at the Registrar's Office, where 
temporary IDs are issued. A replacement fee of S10 is charged to a student's 
term bill. I.D. cards must be returned to the Registrar's Office upon termi- 
nation of student status. 

Summer Study 

HSPH has no regular summer course program, but some students elect to 
do tutorial or research work during the summer recess. A maximum of five 
credits will be given for degree credit in summer study. Students must file 
summer registration forms with the Registrar's Office before the end of May 
in order to receive degree credit for summer work. Tuition for summer 
courses may not be applied toward tuition requirements for the degree. 



Harvard and MIT Summer Schools 

Students should consult departmental advisors before enrolling. De- 
partmental approval is required for degree credit and the Committee on 
Admissions and Degrees considers petitions for degree credit only after 
final grades are received in the Registrar's Office. Students must request 
transcripts and file petitions by published deadlines. 

All other summer work must have prior approval of both department and 
the CAD for consideration for degree credit. The deadline for such petitions 
is May 25. Degree credit is not ordinarily granted for work done at univer- 
sities other than Harvard and MIT. 

The Grading System 

The grading system is as follows: Courses on the 100 and 200 level may be 
taken with ordinal or pass/fail grades. The ordinal system used for 100 and 
200 level courses will be A,B,C, and F. The grades will have the following 
numerical values: A = 4.0 (Excellent), A- =3.7, B+=3.3 (Good), B = 3.0, 
B-=2.70 (Satisfactory), C+=2.3, C = 2.0 (Poor), C- = 1.7, F = (Failing). 
Courses at the 300 level may only be taken pass/fail. 

Minimal grade point average requirements and distributional require- 
ments have been instituted for all students entering degree programs in the 
fall semester of 1979 and thereafter. Semester and cumulative grade point 
averages will be computed on courses taken on an A,B,C,F basis anywhere 
at Harvard and M.I.T. Courses taken pass/fail or on grading systems other 
than A,B,C,F will not be calculated in the grade point average. The minimal 
standard for satisfactory work will be 2.70; students must have that average 
or above to qualify for a degree. Individual departments and programs may 
set more restrictive standards. 

Students taking a one-year degree program are required to take a 
minimum of 30 credits on the A,B,C,F basis and the remainder as the 
student elects. Students taking degree programs lasting two or more years 
are required to take a minimum of 60 credits on the A,B,C,F basis and the 
remainder as the student elects. This requirement will be assessed by the 
Registrar prior to the awarding of any degree. Doctoral students must 
receive grades of either A or B in courses counted for their major or minor 
fields. 

Exceptions to this policy can be sought by students or faculty by petition 
to the Committee on Admissions and Degrees. Cross-registered courses 
taken elsewhere at Harvard can be included in the minimums if they are at 
the 100 level or above and if taken with an A,B,C,F grading system. 

Faculty are encouraged to offer both grading options in all 100 and 200 
level courses. However, faculty who wish to offer only one grading option 
(ordinal or Pass/Fail) may do so but must publish this information in 
advance of the beginning of the course. 

Students have the right to receive grades on the A,B,C,F system, if 
designated on the study card at the beginning of the period. 



When courses are taken on a pass fail basis, grades A through C- are 
equated with a Pass. A grade of F has the same value in either the ordinal or 
the pass fail system. 

Students may normally repeat failed courses for both grade and credit. 
The grade received when the course was taken the first time remains a 
permanent part of the record, but only the repeated grade will be used in 
computing the cumulative grade point average. 

A grade of incomplete (IXC) may be awarded at the discretion of the 
instructor. An IXC will be recorded as a failure on a student's permanent 
record unless the deficiency has been corrected by the end of the next term, 
on the deadline noted in the academic calendar. An instructor may require 
that the student correct the deficiency earlier, in which case the student and 
the Registrar should be informed in writing of the deadline. Students 
receiving an incomplete for a course required for graduation will not be 
awarded a degree until the course work is satisfactorily completed and a 
passing grade submitted to the Registrar's Office in writing. 

Final Examinations 

Final examinations are ordinarily scheduled during the last week of each 
period. Final examinations must be taken and may not be repeated, except 
that, with the concurrence of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and the 
Chairman of the Department concerned, a facultv member responsible for a 
first-quarter fall course will have the option of offering a re-examination to 
students who have failed the regular final examination. A student who does 
not attend a final examination in a course will be given a grade of ABS. At 
the discretion of the Assistant Dean . makeup examinations mav be given to 
students who were absent from the regularly scheduled final exam because 
of significant medical or personal reasons. In such cases the Assistant Dean 
should, if possible, be given notice in advance of the beginning of the 
examination. Unexcused absences remain ungraded, and no credit is given 
for the course. Incompletes mav not be given for unexcused absences from 
final examinations. 

Grade Points 

Grade points for a course will be determined by multiplying the number of 
credit units times the value associated with the grade assigned. The grade 
point average is defined as the sum of grade points earned divided by the 
total credit units for which grade points were calculated. 
Grade Point Averages 

The minimum standard for satisfactory work at the School is a B— average 
or a grade point average of at least 2.70. In some departments and programs, 
however, students will be expected to maintain an average above this 
minimum. Such requirements will be stated in advance. A student whose 
record is below the standards of the department, may, at the end of a given 
term, be informed by the Committee on Admissions and Degrees, upon 
recommendation of the department, that he or she may re-register subject 
to specific academic conditions which if not fulfilled by the date specified 
may result in the termination of candidacy. 

Registration 81 



Alternatives 

During registration, each student should mark the box on each course card 
indicating which grading system — ordinal or pass/fail — is desired. Note 
that 300-level courses are graded only P/F. In the event of cross-registration, 
the grading system of the host school must be used for that particular 
course. Students planning future application to doctoral programs are ad- 
vised to elect the ordinal system. Doctoral students must elect the ordinal 
system in all courses offered for their major or minor fields. Students should 
discuss the advantages and disadvantages of both the ordinal and P/F 
grading systems with their advisors before selecting an option. 

Ordinal grades provide a more definitive record of student performance 
and are therefore useful in future job and academic applications. An advan- 
tage of the P/F system is that students will not be inhibited from taking 
courses of interest outside their areas of concentration for fear of obtaining 
poor grades. Also, some students already have advanced professional de- 
grees or job experience which makes taking over the required number of 
ordinal credits unnecessary for their future plans. 

In selecting grading options, students must consider both minimum 
school distribution requirements and any additional requirements set by 
their department or program. 

Calculation of Credit Units 

Credit units are assigned on the basis of the total amount of time required 
by a course, both in class and outside of class. Twenty credit units consti- 
tute a full program for one term. Ordinarily a full-time student may register 
for no more than 25 credit units per semester unless permission is granted 
by the Committee on Admissions and Degrees before the drop/add 
deadline. Half-time students may register for no more than 12.5 credits per 
semester. 

Changes in Grades 

Final authority for the designation of grades rests with the principal in- 
structor in each course. Once a grade has been reported in writing to the 
Registrar's Office, it can only be changed upon written request of the 
instructor to the Dean for Academic Affairs. This does not apply to changes 
from INC to appropriate grades for credit. Letters regarding changes must 
include an explanation as to why the grade is being changed. If the grade is 
based on clerical error, the Dean for Academic Affairs may authorize the 
Registrar to change the grade. If it is an error of judgment or because of new 
information regarding the student's performance, the change will be ap- 
proved only if also approved by the Committee on Admissions and De- 
grees. The instructor is ordinarily expected to indicate that he or she has 
reviewed the work of other students in the course in order to determine that 
no similar errors have been made and gone uncorrected. 



Financial Information 



Tuition and Fee Schedule 

The tuition fees for the academic year 1982-83 are listed below: 

$7,350* Full-time resident tuition 

3,790* Half-time resident tuition 

3,850* Doctoral reduced tuition 

2,050* Doctoral half-time reduced tuition 

850* Doctoral facilities fee (resident) 

330 Nonresident doctoral guidance fee 

35 Active file fee for degree candidates on leave of absence 



Part-time special students enrolled for 6 to 9 credit units per 
term: 

310* First credit unit of work per term 
180 Each additional credit unit 

Part-time special students enrolled for 5 or fewer credit units 
per term: 

180 Charge per credit unit per term 

Degree candidates who register and receive credit for re- 
search or supervised study during the 1983 summer session: 

900 Five-credit program 



20 Late Registration Fee 
15 Late Study Card Fee 

10 Drop- Add Petition Fee (for each petition filed) 

The starred amounts include the University Health Service fee for medi- 
cal care for all resident students enrolled for 6 or more credit units. Univer- 
sity Health Service coverage extends from September 1 through August 31. 

Hospital insurance is billed separately. A Blue Cross/Blue Shield student 
insurance plan provides coverage for many costs of medical care not offered 
at the University Health Services. Coverage under this plan extends from 
September 1 through August 31. The tentative premium for the Blue 
Cross/Blue Shield student insurance plan is compulsory for all nonimmi- 
grant foreign students; all other students are also enrolled in the plan unless 
they have other adequate medical insurance and submit a waiver within 
two weeks following registration. Students who fail to file waivers will be 
responsible for any fees billed for that term. Waivers for hospital insurance 
only are approved by the Director of the University Health Services. 

It should be noted that nonresident doctoral students are not eligible to 
participate in any Harvard health plan. For continued Blue Cross/Blue 
Shield coverage, nonresident doctoral students must file special forms with 
the student insurance office in Holyoke Center by the deadlines published 
for each semester. This insurance is compulsory for all nonimmigrant 
foreign students in nonresident status within the United States. 

Financial Information / 83 



Final Doctoral Tuition Fee 

For the registration period in which a dissertation is formally approved and 
accepted by the department and the Committee on Admissions and De- 
grees, a Doctor of Science or Doctor of Public Health candidate must have 
paid at least half of the then current facilities fee. The fee for 1982-83 is $210. 
Students graduating in November or March who wish to maintain health 
insurance during the final term are required to pay one half the University 
Health Services fee (estimated at $264) and one half the Blue Cross/Blue 
Shield fee (estimated at $235). 

Payment of Fees 

No student will be permitted to register in any term until all money due 
from prior term bills and at least one quarter of the commencing term's 
tuition and fees have been paid in full. Students not enrolled in the ex- 
tended payment plan must pay the full amount by the dates indicated in 
order to register. 

Special students enrolled for less than 10 credits are required to pay all 
tuition and fees for the term in full when they file study cards. In event of 
withdrawal, tuition will be prorated according to the schedule below. All 
other bills for tuition and fees will be issued and payable as follows: 

Student term bills for the fall term will be issued on July 26, and will be 
payable in full by August 20. 

Bills for the spring term will be issued in early January, and will be 
payable in full by January 21. 

Payments may be scheduled over monthly installments (four each term) 
through an optional payment plan that is available at a service charge of $25 
per term. 

Students who are candidates for degrees must have paid all bills to the 
University at least three days before the day upon which the degrees are to 
be voted by the Faculty of the School of Public Health. 

A student who leaves the University for any reason whatever must pay all 
charges against him or her immediately upon receipt of a bill from the 
Office of Fiscal Services. Every student is held responsible for the payment 
of fees until he or she has notified the Registrar in writing of his or her 
intention to withdraw from the School. A student who fails to submit 
written notification of withdrawal will be liable for tuition and fees for the 
term. 

A student who leaves the School during the academic year is responsible 
for tuition charges in accordance with the following: 

Leaves by Percent of Total 

First Term Second Term Semester Charges 

October 22 February 25 25% 

November 24 March 25 50% 

December 23 April 22 75% 



Students leaving after December 23 and April 22 of the first and second 
terms, respectively, are responsible for full tuition charges. 

If a student who is receiving any form of financial aid withdraws and is 
entitled to a refund, a portion of that refund may be returned to the financial 
aid fund. A special refund rule applies to these funds: National Direct 
Student Loans, Guaranteed Insured Student Loans, Federally Insured Stu- 
dent Loans. These funds must receive the same proportion of the refund as 
the proportion which each constituted of the original aid package. 

All term bills are sent to the student at his or her local address unless the 
Office of Fiscal Services is requested in writing to send them elsewhere. 

Any student whose indebtedness to the University remains unpaid on 
the date fixed for payment is deprived of the privileges of the University. 
Reinstatement is obtained only by consent of the Dean of the School in 
which the student is enrolled after payment of all indebtedness and a 
reinstatement fee of $20. As a further condition of reinstatement, the stu- 
dent is required to file with the Office of Fiscal Services a bond in the 
amount of $1,000 as security for the payment of future term bills. 

Registration and Tuition Guidelines 

The following guidelines for payment of tuition apply as stated to all 
students who enrolled at the School of Public Health for the first time on or 
after September 1, 1979. The guidelines also apply to students enrolled at 
the School before that date, with the exception of certain aspects of the 
policy concerning payment of tuition by doctoral candidates. Information 
concerning the applicability of the guidelines to doctoral students enrolled 
in a degree program at the School during the academic year 1977-78 can be 
obtained from the Registrar's Office. 

Degree Candidates 

After admission to the School of Public Health and until fulfillment of 
requirements for the degree, all degree candidates must be registered 
continuously in one of the following registration categories: 

1. Resident students 

2. Nonresident doctoral students 

3. Students on leave of absence 

All degree candidates must pay the appropriate tuition rate for each 
registration period as described below; they may not pay tuition on a "per 
credit" basis. It should be noted that, in order to qualify for deferment of an 
educational loan, a student must be registered for no less than a half-time 
study program. 

Tuition for summer school courses may not be credited toward any 
tuition requirements for the degree. 

1. Resident Students 

All degree candidates who are enrolled in courses or who intend to 
use any Harvard academic facilities for an extended period of time 
must register as resident students. 



Students who are registered in a master's degree program in the 
School will be charged full tuition. 

Students who are registered in a doctoral degree program in the 
School will be charged full tuition for two years (with up to one year 
of credit for full tuition paid as a currently enrolled master's degree 
candidate at the School), followed by one year of reduced tuition. 
For subsequent terms of enrollment the facilities fee will be charged, 
which provides for full access to Harvard academic facilities and the 
University Health Services, and for the issuance of a Harvard resi- 
dent identification card. 
Part-Time Resident Students 

Any degree candidate who registers for less than full time must in 
any event fulfill the full-time full tuition requirements for the de- 
gree. A master's degree student completing a two-year program in 
three years must plan to pay at the full-time full tuition rate during 
the first year and half-time tuition each subsequent year at the rate 
for that year. 

2. Nonresident Doctoral Students 

Doctoral students who no longer reside in the Greater Boston area* 
and who are engaged in less than half-time work on the degree and 
who have received permission from their department and the 
Committee on Admissions and Degrees to pursue a portion of their 
programs as nonresidents will be charged the nonresident doctoral 
fee. Students in this category normally will have completed pay- 
ment of at least the required two years of doctoral full tuition and 
one year of reduced tuition before applying for nonresident status; 
they must in any case complete this payment prior to their gradua- 
tion and will be billed accordingly while in nonresident status. 

Nonresident doctoral students are charged the nonresident doc- 
toral guidance fee, which covers periodic consultation with the 
student's doctoral adviser but does not provide for the use of Har- 
vard facilities or for the issuance of a Harvard identification card. 
Also, as noted above, a student registered for less than a half-time 
study program may not qualify for deferment of an educational 
loan. Upon expiration (or earlier termination) of CAD permission 
for nonresident status, or for a term in which use of Harvard 
facilities is required, the appropriate resident rate will be charged. 

3. Students on Leave of Absence 

Degree candidates who will not, during a given registration period, 
be engaged in study or research for a degree from the School, and 
who will be making no use of Harvard facilities, must apply to the 



*Students residing within a 50-mile radius of downtown Boston will normally be considered 
resident for tuition purposes. 



Registrar for a leave of absence. Leaves of absence are ordinarily 
granted for a maximum of two registration periods and require 
approval of the student's department and of the CAD. 

Students on leave of absence are required to pay the active file fee 
to maintain their degree candidacy. Upon expiration (or earlier 
termination) of CAD permission for leave of absence, students will 
be charged the appropriate tuition rate. 

Termination of Degree Candidacy 

Students who do not intend to register in any one of the categories noted 
above must terminate their candidacy for the degree. Such students are 
required: (1) to file in the Registrar's Office a written notice of intent to 
withdraw; (2) to inform their department; and (3) to arrange an exit inter- 
view with the Financial Aid Office, when appropriate. If students do not 
terminate their degree candidacy formally but fail to register for a full term 
or longer, degree candidacy will be terminated automatically. Students 
who are withdrawn must apply for readmission. 

The CAD, with departmental recommendation, may terminate a stu- 
dent's degree candidacy on the basis of unsatisfactory performance in 
course work. Candidacy also will ordinarily be terminated in the case of a 
student who has exceeded the five-year limit for completion of degree 
requirements following registration as a doctoral candidate. Doctoral can- 
didacy may be terminated as a result of failure to submit an acceptable 
proposal for the thesis. Also, the Administrative Board may recommend 
termination of candidacy in matters involving academic discipline. 

A student who wishes to reactivate degree candidacy should file an 
application for readmission, which must be approved by the department 
and by the CAD. Prior to readmission, the student must pay any outstand- 
ing bills to the University, as well as the then-current active file fee for each 
registration period that has elapsed since the termination of candidacy. 
Nondegree Candidates 

Requirements for admission to nondegree programs are described on p. 
75. 

Special students registered for full-time or for half-time study programs 
will pay the corresponding full tuition rate; those registered for less than 
half time will pay tuition on a "per credit" basis as outlined in the tuition 
and fee schedule. 

Field Studies 

Field opportunities, listed under each department's course offerings and 
bearing the course number 330, often entail travel expenses that must be 
met by the student. Information about estimated expenses should be 
obtained from the appropriate department. 



Living Expenses 

Living costs in the Boston area are higher than in most areas from which 
students come. The following are minimum amounts estimated that stu- 
dents will need in the academic year 1982-1983 to cover expenses for 
approximately ten months. 

A single person will need at least $16,635, in addition to travel expenses, 
to cover the cost of tuition ($7,350), health fees ($235), books ($500), rent 
($3,250), and other living expenses ($5,300) for approximately ten months. 
A family of four will need at least $23,085, in addition to travel expenses, to 
cover tuition ($7,350), health fees ($235), books ($500), rent ($5,500), and 
other living expenses ($9,500), including medical care for spouse and chil- 
dren. 

Applicants who plan to enroll in a two-year program should allow for 
proportionate additional expenses for the summer months and allow for a 
ten to twelve percent increase for the academic year 1983-1984. 

Housing 

The Henry Lee Shattuck International House is an apartment residence 
operated on a nonprofit basis by the School for its full-time students and 
their families from the United States and abroad. Located at 199, 203, and 
207 Park Drive, within walking distance of the School, the House consists of 
72 individual apartments, each with its own kitchenette and bath. 

All apartments are rented furnished with basic items except for linens, 
blankets, and kitchen utensils. No unfurnished units are provided. The 
monthly rent charge includes all utilities — hot water, heat, gas, and 
electricity — but not telephone service. 

Applications should be submitted by May 15, although late applications 
will be considered as long as space is available. For application forms and 
more detailed information, write to Carol O'Connell, Office of Student 
Affairs, Room G-4, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave- 
nue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. 

The Office of Student Affairs maintains an up-to-date list of private 
housing and local real estate agencies. 

The Harvard University Housing Office in Cambridge arranges for hous- 
ing in University-owned complexes. Information and application forms 
may be obtained by writing to the Harvard University Housing Office, 7 
Holyoke Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138. A copy of the student's 
letter of acceptance from the School must be enclosed to prove affiliation. 
This Office also maintains listings of apartments and houses not owned by 
the University. These listings must be viewed in person; information is not 
given out by mail or telephone. 



88 / General Information 



Student Health Service 

Under the University Health and Insurance Plan, students at the School of 
Public Health receive medical care and insurance toward hospital expenses. 
Medical care is provided through the facilities of the Medical Area Health 
Service, located in Vanderbilt Hall. The hospitalization insurance extends 
for a period of 12 months from September 1, and covers hospitalization in 
Boston and elsewhere. Nondegree, post-doctoral research and teaching 
fellows who are in a training status are required to enroll in the Student 
Health Plan unless they can show that they have comparable coverage. 

In addition, a prepaid program for spouses (including maternity bene- 
fits) and children of full-time students is available. As the plan provides 
extensive benefits for ambulatory and inpatient care, all who are eligible are 
strongly advised to enroll. Its coverage, like that of the Student Plan, 
extends for a period of 12 months from September 1, and provides full 
semiprivate hospitalization benefits. A descriptive brochure about the plan 
for dependents is sent to students before registration or may be obtained 
from the Registrar. 

Any illness necessitating absence from classes should be reported to the 
Medical Area Health Service Office by the student or an attending physi- 
cian, and to the Registrar's Office at the School. A physician from the 
Medical Area Health Service, on call twenty-four hours a day, can be 
reached through the switchboard of Harvard University. 

For further information, contact the Director, Medical Area Health Ser- 
vice, 275 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. Telephone: 
(617) 732-1370. 

Loans and Fellowships 

The Harvard School of Public Health is a participant in the Harvard Univer- 
sity Guaranteed Student Loan programs (GSL/FISL) and Auxiliary Loan to 
Aid Students (PLUS). These programs permit a student who is either a U.S. 
citizen or has immigrant status to borrow up to $5,000 a year under the 
GSL/FISL program, providing the student has less than $20,000 in outstand- 
ing loans through these programs and up to $3,000 a year through the PLUS 
program, providing the student passes certain eligibility requirements. 

In addition to the above loan programs, a full-time student may borrow 
through the Health Education Assistance Loan program (HEAL), a federally 
insured loan program for a graduate student who is either a U.S. Citizen or 
has immigrant status. Eligible lenders are participating banks. 

Some fellowship support is available through departments and special 
programs from federal and nonfederal sources for qualified students in a 
variety of fields. In addition, there are limited amounts of funds available 
under the National Direct Student Loan and College Work Study programs. 

If a student who is receiving any form of financial aid withdraws and is 
entitled to a refund, a portion of that refund may be returned to the financial 
aid fund. A special refund rule applies to these funds: National Direct 
Student Loans, Guaranteed Student Loans, Federally Insured Student 




Loans and Fellowships 89 



Loans. These funds must receive the same proportion of the refund as the 
proportion which each constituted of the original aid package. 

As a matter of policy, the Harvard School of Public Health does not 
discriminate among applicants and students in fellowship and loan pro- 
grams on the basis of race, religion, sex, national origin, color, creed, 
handicap, sexual orientation, Vietnam-era or veteran status, marital or 
parental status, or age. 

Detailed information about fellowships and loans can be obtained by 
writing to Ms. Margaret C. Salmon, Director of Financial Aid, Harvard 
School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 
02115. 

Scholarships 

The Committee on General Scholarships and the Sheldon Fund administers 
a number of scholarships which are open to applicants from all Schools of 
the University. These include Travelling Fellowships, Restricted and Unre- 
stricted Scholarships. Eligibility for many of these funds is very specific and 
varies according to terms of donors. Nomination for these scholarships 
must be made by the Director of Financial Aid. For a complete list of 
University Scholarships, applicants should consult the General Catalogue 
Issue of Harvard University. 

Some awards are made available through departments or the Financial 
Aid Office and are based on scholastic achievement. One example is the 
John E. Thayer Scholarship which is the Bequest of John E. Thayer, the 
income to be paid "to the ten most meritorius scholars in Harvard Univer- 
sity every year — the income shall only be paid to such meritorious scholars 
as who actually need the same." This award is determined by the Commit- 
tee on Financial Aid following the first semester of each academic year. The 
award is based on a review of the grade cards of students who have elected 
the ordinal grading system and a needs analysis based on financial records 
on file in the Office of Financial Aid. 



Office of Student Affairs 



The Office of Student Affairs coordinates the activities of the Registrar's 
Office, the Financial Aid Office, the Office of Career Services, plans student 
recruitment activities, and acts as liaison with the Alumni Association. The 
staff works with other groups and individuals to identify the special needs 
of students, plan and direct orientation, publish a weekly newsletter, and 
coordinate social events. Up-to-date information is maintained on hous- 
ing, child-care facilities, transportation, and athletic outlets in the Medical 
Area, Boston, and Cambridge. 

The Office provides career counseling and maintains a resource center 
containing job listings. The Office contacts potential employers to acquaint 
them with programs at the School and to request information about job 
openings. Current positions (permanent, summer, and part-time) are 
posted. Students are assisted in writing resumes, arranging for interviews, 
and exploring career opportunities. The Office's activities complement the 
efforts of departments, programs, and faculty advisers. Data collected about 
positions and salaries of graduates are available to prospective students. 

The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs is responsible for assisting handi- 
capped students in adapting to life at the School. 

Further information can be obtained from the Assistant Dean for Student 
Affairs, Harvard School of Public Health, Room G-4, 677 Huntington Ave- 
nue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. 

Lockers and Mailboxes 

During Orientation the Office of Student Affairs assigns each student a 
locker with a combination lock, and a mailbox. The lockers are located on 
the ground, second, and fifth floors of Kresge; the mailboxes are on the 
G-level of Kresge. Some departments also provide student mailboxes. An- 
nouncements about course changes, student events, Student Coordinating 
Committee business and numerous other items of School concern are 
distributed through the HSPH mailboxes. In addition, faculty members 
often send notices to individual students through this internal mailing 
system. It is important to regularly check mailboxes for these communica- 
tions. 

Typists and Typewriters 

HSPH does not have a typing pool for students. Typists seeking work make 
this known by placing notices on the bulletin boards at HSPH. An electric 
typewriter is available for student use in the cubical in the S.C.C. lounge 
area on the G-level in Kresge. Replacement ribbons for this typewriter can 
be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs. 
Bulletin Boards 

Many items of interest cannot be distributed individually to each student 
and are instead announced by postings on appropriate bulletin boards. 
Accordingly, it is useful to be aware of the variety of bulletin boards and to 
make a regular practice of scanning them. An important bulletin board to 
check is outside the Office of Student Affairs — it contains important aca- 

Office of Student Affairs 91 



demic notices from the Dean's and the Registrar's Offices. In addition, 
many listings from potential employers are listed on the bulletin board in 
the G-level area. On the wall approaching the cafeteria on the first floor of 
Kresge is another set of bulletin boards containing miscellaneous postings 
by students or persons outside the School. Next to the Kresge elevators on 
most floors is a bulletin board which announces academic events and 
public or professional presentations in the Medical Area. 

Most departments maintain a bulletin board where relevant material is 
posted, including job inquiries from employers. 

Facilities for the Care of Small Children 

Although there are a number of child care facilities in the area, they are 
quickly filled, so arrangements should be made as early as possible. Har- 
vard University Child Care is located in Cambridge. For information about 
the services they provide, including the Medical Area, call the Office of the 
Child Care Advisor (495-2851). 

The Student Affairs Office will be happy to answer any further questions 
about available child care facilities. 

Protection of Rights and Privacy of Students 

The School of Public Health has adopted policies and procedures in com- 
pliance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, which is 
commonly referred to as "the Buckley Amendment." Copies may be ob- 
tained from the Registrar's Office, Room G-4, 677 Huntington Avenue. 

The Buckley Amendment was designed to protect the privacy of student 
educational records, afford students and former students the right to in- 
spect the records that directly concern them, and provide students and 
former students the right to question and challenge the content of their 
educational records through formal hearings. 

General records are compiled by the Admissions Office. These include 
materials furnished by the student, such as application forms and personal 
statements, references, transcripts, and other materials from third parties. 
These files are not available to students until they register at the School. 
Once a student registers, these folders are transferred to the Registrar's 
Office, where they are held until the student graduates. Copies of any 
correspondence with the student are added to these folders. In addition, if a 
student applies for financial aid, separate records of these transactions are 
kept in the Financial Aid Office. 

Those at the School who have access to student records are the student's 
academic advisor, the student's department chairman or program head, 
departmental evaluation committees where appropriate, the Committee on 
Admissions and Degrees, and the Dean's Office. Students may request to 
see their records any time after registration by going to the appropriate 
office and requesting an appointment to inspect the records. Students 
wishing to discuss or question their records may speak with the Assistant 
Dean for Student Affairs. If a student wants to change or expunge some- 
thing from the file, she/he should make a written request and file it with the 

92 / General Information 



Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. A committee, comprised of the Assis- 
tant Dean for Student Affairs, the Registrar and the Dean for Academic 
Affairs, will consider the request and make a decision as to the appropriate 
action. If the requested change is not granted, the student may place in the 
file her/his explanation and objection to the information in question. 

If a student believes that the School has failed to comply with the 
provisions of this amendment, or the implementing regulations, he or she 
may file a complaint with the Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 

The following information is considered "Directory Information" and 
will be released on request without the student's specific written consent: 
Dates of attendance, program and field in which they are enrolled, full- or 
part-time status, degrees received, address and phone number (unless the 
student specifically asks at Registration that these not be released), date and 
place of birth, degrees received from other institutions, and name of aca- 
demic advisor. Transcripts of academic work, or grades in any form, will 
not be released without the student's specific authorization, except to 
appropriate faculty advisors and committees with responsibility for stu- 
dents' academic progress. Outside organizations or institutions are never 
given access to student records but are permitted to interview the Registar 
regarding the student's record upon presentation of signed consent forms. 
In such cases, every attempt is made to protect the privacy of the student 
and to prevent coercion by prospective employers. 

Currently enrolled students who are applying for other programs at the 
School have the right to request that materials in their current student folder 
not be made available to the admissions committees considering applica- 
tions. 

Disciplinary Procedures for Students 

Incidents of improper conduct by a student shall be reported at once to the 
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. After investigation, the Assistant Dean 
will either resolve the issue informally, in consultation with the parties 
involved, or refer the matter to the Administrative Board. 

The Administrative Board, after receiving a formal charge and report 
from the Assistant Dean, will convene to consider the case. They may call 
witnesses and review all evidence they deem relevant. The student in- 
volved may provide witnesses and other relevant evidence. The student 
may be present during the presentation of all evidence against her or him. 

The Administrative Board must render a decision within a reasonable 
period of time, and may impose penalties ranging from Suspension to 
Probation. Expulsion requires a vote by the full faculty. The Board's actions 
shall be separate from the responsibility of instructors to evaluate the 
academic performance of students. 

Following the Administrative Board's decision, the student may appeal 
to the Dean of the Faculty for a review of the procedure. The Dean may 
reverse the decision only if there has been unfairness in the procedure, or 
misconduct by the Board. The Dean will not reconsider the appropriateness 
of the finding or the penalty. 

Disciplinary Procedures / 93 



Student Conduct 

Students are expected to respect the rights of the other members of the 
Harvard School of Public Health community and to maintain high stan- 
dards of ethical conduct and personal integrity. A student is expected to do 
her or his own work, and incidents of intellectual dishonesty will result in 
disciplinary action. A student may not submit the same paper in more than 
one course without the prior written permission of the instructors in- 
volved. 

Students are expected to abide by all city, state and federal laws, as well as 
University regulations, and infractions of the same may result in discipli- 
nary action by the school. 

Grievance Procedures for Students 

For both legal and policy reasons, it is desirable that students at the School 
of Public Health have an established and approved mechanism by which 
serious grievances may be promptly and equitably resolved. 

The following procedures are to be used by students for the resolution of 
grievances alleging unfair action on the part of the University Administra- 
tion or Faculty including discrimination on the basis of race, color, religious 
belief, sex (including sexual harassment), national or ethnic origin, handi- 
cap, or age. 

I. The Informal Resolution of Grievances 

A student with a grievance should initially take the matter to one of the 
following people: his or her advisor, department chairman, Dean of the 
School, Dean for Academic Affairs, Dean for Student Affairs, Affirmative 
Action Officer, or other appropriate faculty member or administrator. If the 
grievance cannot be resolved satisfactorily between the student and the 
initial faculty/administration contact, the student may, at his or her discre- 
tion, seek resolution via the formal procedure outlined in Section II. The 
person investigating the grievance shall, at the request of the student, make 
a written report available to the ad hoc grievance committee in the event that 
resolution is not possible in the informal phase. 

II. The Formal Grievance Procedure 

An aggrieved student, may at his or her request, seek resolution of the 
grievance via the formal procedures outlined below. 

A. A formal grievance is a complaint in writing from the student to the Dean 
for Student Affairs (in the event that the grievance is against the Dean for 
Student Affairs, the written complaint shall go directly to the Dean of the 
School) asking that an ad hoc grievance committee be appointed. The 
written complaint should be filed within two months of the event to which 
it refers and should include the following: 

• Statement of the allegation; 

• Description of the alleged facts; 

• Name or names of the person(s) thought to be responsible for the alleged 

events; and 

• Other facts considered to be pertinent to the case. 



B. The Dean for Student Affairs will then appoint an ad hoc grievance 
committee consisting of a representative of the Faculty Council, a member 
of the School's Administration, and a student, chosen by the Student 
Coordinating Committee, who has completed at least one semester at the 
School. This ad hoc grievance committee will be appointed and convened 
within ten (10) working days of receipt by the Dean for Student Affairs of 
the written complaint; in all cases confidentiality shall be maintained 
during the selection and appointment process. A quorum will require that 
all members be present. The Dean for Student Affairs will appoint the 
chairperson of the committee. 

C. The ad hoc grievance committee shall investigate the grievance. This 
investigation shall include, but need not be limited to, the following: 

• Meeting(s) with the person aggrieved and the person(s) (or department) 
grieved against; and 

• Consultation with such others as the ad hoc grievance committee shall 
deem necessary to provide a thorough investigation of the grievance, 
including scientific ramifications or concerns, and other mitigating or 
extenuating circumstances that bear upon the situation. 

D. The ad hoc grievance committee shall expeditiously consider the facts of 
the case and present a report to the Dean of the School. The report shall 
include findings of facts and recommendations, if any. Every precaution 
shall be taken to ensure the confidentiality of information obtained at 
meetings of the ad hoc grievance committee. The Committee shall also make 
every effort to conclude the investigation quickly enough to prevent the 
situation from becoming irreversible and to take any needed remedial 
action. 

E. Upon receipt of the report from the ad hoc grievance committee, the Dean 
of the School may do one of the following: 

• Take whatever action, if any, he feels is warranted, using the report of the 
ad hoc grievance committee as advisory information; or 

• Return the matter to the ad hoc grievance committee for further considera- 
tion. This action will return the grievance to Step C of this procedure. 

F. The final action of the Dean of the School constitutes the formal comple- 
tion of the grievance procedure. The ad hoc grievance committee will then 
be discharged. Final action of the Dean of the School will be communicated 
to both the person aggrieved and the person(s) (or department) grieved 
against. Once the procedure is completed, all records of the meetings of the 
ad hoc grievance committee and the final report of the committee will 
remain in the possession of the Dean and will be held in strict confidence. 

G. Any request for exceptions to the foregoing should be addressed to the 
Dean for Student Affairs. By mutual agreement of the Dean for Student 
Affairs and the student, the stated formal procedure may be waived in favor 
of a procedure more appropriate to a particular circumstance. 



Alumni Association 

The School's Alumni Association has a membership of approximately 3,500 
graduates located throughout the world. The Association is governed by an 
elected Council which meets twice a year, once in the fall at the APHA 
annual meeting, and once in the spring at the School. In 1977 the Associa- 
tion initiated the Margaret Dale Penrose Scholarship Fund which has since 
been permanently endowed with gifts from Alumni and friends and a 
matching amount from the School. In 1981 the Association was instrumen- 
tal in the establishment of an Alumni Fund for Student Assistance to which 
alumni contribute annually. For information about alumni activities, con- 
tact the Assistant Dean for Student and Alumni Affairs. 



Courses of Instruction 



In the course listings, course numbers 
from 100 to 199 indicate undergraduate 
and graduate courses; numbers from 200 
to 299 indicate primarily graduate 
courses; and numbers from 300 to 399 in- 
dicate graduate courses of reading and 
research. 

The letters "a," "b," "c," "d," and "e" 
following the course number indicate the 
period(s) in which a course is given, with 
"a" denoting first period and "b", second 
period (fall); "c" , third period and "d", 
fourth period (spring). The letter "e" in- 
dicates supervised special studies or field 
observations, usually during the one- 
week period between fall and spring 
terms or during the post-class period fol- 
lowing the spring term. 
The credit assignment is given in units 
following the statement of number and 
length of sessions per week. Course titles 
in bold type are often followed by titles 
and numbers in roman face (enclosed in 
parentheses). This indicates that the 
course is also listed in other Harvard 
catalogs, namely, Arts and Sciences, and 
that the course credit is provided through 
that faculty as well as through the School 
of Public Health, e.g., MCHA-BEH 
237c,d (Education, P-220), POP 185a,b 
(Sociology 185), EHS 264c,d (Engineering 
283). 

The School reserves the right to make 
changes in the regulations and courses 
announced in this Register. 



Office of Continuing Education 

Through its Office of Continuing Education, 
the School of Public Health offers a variety of 
short-term technical courses for professional 
public health personnel. Courses currently 
confirmed for presentation during the 1982-83 
academic year are listed below. Additional in- 
formation can be obtained from the Office of 
Continuing Education, Harvard School of Pub- 
lic Health (Telephone: 617: 732-1171). 

Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation 

July 7-9, 1982 
Environmental Radiation Surveillance 

July 12-16, 1982 
Consulting in International Health Planning 

July 19-23, 1982 
HarvardERT Joint Course on Air Pollution 
Meteorology 

July 26-30, 1982 
Occupational Epidemiology 

July 26-30, 1982 
Certification of Biological Safety Cabinets 

August 9-14, 1982 
Engineering Control of Occupational 
Exposures 

August 16-20, 1982 
In-Place Filter Testing Workshop 

August 23-27, 1982 
Occupational and Environmental Radiation 
Protection 

August 23-27, 1982 
Current Topics in Industrial Hygiene 

September 22-24, 1982 
Program for Chiefs of Clinical Services 

October 3-15, 1982 
Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene 

October 18-22, 1982 
Occupational and Environmental Radiation 
Protection 

March 28 - April 1, 1983 
Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene 

March 28 - April 1, 1983 
Planning for Nuclear Emergencies 

June 13-17, 1983 
In-Place Filter Testing Workshop 

June 13-17, 1983 



Interdepartmental Courses 

ID 104a. Introduction to Selected Medical 
Problems for Non-Physicians 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 1.25 
units. Dr. Gellhorn. 

Provides students who have limited back- 
grounds in biology and medicine with a famil- 
iarity of medical terminology, some knowledge 
of the pathophysiology of human disease and 
diagnostic methodology, and information 
about the types of therapeutic regimens in cur- 
rent use. The symptoms which bring patients 
to health care providers will be described, and 
approaches to diagnoses and treatment will be 
presented. 

Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program General 
Track. 

ID 201a,b. Historical Analysis of Public Health 
Policy and Practice: United States, 1900-1975 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Rosenkrantz. 
Identifies six issues to illustrate the relation- 
ship between social experience and profes- 
sional responsibility for prevention of disease. 
Topics selected for analysis based on historical 
example illustrate policy-related issues: how 
health hazards are identified; determinants of 
resources; criteria of efficacy and equity in pol- 
icy and services. Recommended for students 
who wish to relate their special competence to 
the network of objectives in public health. 

ID 209a, b. Health Services in Developing 
Countries 

Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Cash, Dr. Koch-Weser. 
Provides a broad overview of health and health 
care problems in developing countries. Central 
issues include: ecologic, environmental, and 
other characteristics of developing countries 
affecting health; analysis of their health prob- 
lems, the alternative approaches to solving 
them, the policy and planning issues in apply- 
ing solutions, and the organizational alterna- 
tives for utilizing health resources; the nature, 
composition, and training of the health team 
for use at the local and district levels; and the 
relation of health to development and the posi- 
tion of health in national planning priorities. 
Preference given to students who have pre- 
viously been involved in international health 
activities. 



ID 212c. Biomedical Writing 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 2 
units. Dr. Chernin. 

Writing scientific papers is an integral part of 
the research process. This course develops 
practical skills and experience in planning and 
writing articles that meet the editorial de- 
mands of biomedical journals. The salient 
elements of a well-prepared article — logical 
organization, clear and concise scientific 
prose, and understandable tables and figures 
— are emphasized by criticizing short papers 
written by the participants on biomedical 
subjects of their own choice. 
Enrollment limited to 10 students and requires 
approval of the instructor at least two weeks 
before the quarter begins. This course will be 
given pass/fail. 

ID 215c, d. Environmental Health Evaluation 
and Management 

Seminars, lectures. Two 2 Vi-hour sessions each 
week; additional computational sessions to be ar- 
ranged. 5 units. Dr. Harrington. 
Introduces concepts and analytical methods for 
the quantitative evaluation and management 
of man's environment. Topics include: the de- 
velopment of natural resources, resulting 
environmental conditions, and effects on 
human health. Where appropriate, mathemat- 
ical models are developed and critiqued in a 
systems analysis framework. Students are re- 
quired to submit a term project. 
A strong background in college-level mathe- 
matics is assumed. 

ID 217c, d. Capitalism, Socialism, and Public 
Health 

Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Lewontin, Dr. Levins, Vis- 
iting Lecturers. 

General course contrasting the analysis of 
problems in public health, nutrition, and 
population by Marxist and capitalistic social 
and economic theories. Topics include: Marx- 
ist economics and social theory, population 
control, "green revolution," nutrition plan- 
ning, maternal and child health, and occupa- 
tional health. 



ID 220c, d. A Case Study in Integrated 
Planning 

(Economics 2730, Education A-885, Planning 
281, Government S-562) 

Lectures, seminars. Tiuo 2-hour sessions each 
week. 5 units. Dr. Cash, Dr. David Cole, Lec- 
turer on Economics, Harvard Institute for In- 
ternational Development, Dr. John Thomas, 
Institute Fellow, Harvard Institute for Interna- 
tional Development. 

This seminar brings together students and fac- 
ulty from the Graduate Schools of Public 
Health, Design, Education, Arts and Sciences 
(Economics), and from the Harvard Institute 
for International Development, to write a de- 
velopment plan for a specific geopolitical area 
of a developing country. This development 
planning problem is derived from an ongoing 
1 HID project and emphasizes an inter-discipli- 
nary team approach to problem solving and 
planning. 

Enrollment subject to approval of the in- 
structor. 

ID 221c. Case Studies in Decision Making in 
the Control of Diseases of Public Health Im- 
portance 

Lectures, team meetings. Two 2-hour sessions 
each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Nichols, Guest 
Lecturers. 

Cases drawn from domestic and Third World 
sources are studied from the standpoint of de- 
cision makers in the control of diseases of pub- 
lic health importance. Students in teams will 
propose solutions to problems after utilizing 
information drawn from a spectrum of sources 
including: molecular biology, host-parasite in- 
teractions, epidemiology, management of re- 
source allocations, cultural and socioeconom- 
ical constraints. Using a fictitious country as a 
case study, students are taught practical skills 
relevant to LDC's; these include: solving prob- 
lems in surveillance, pharmaceutical supply 
and distribution, and finance. 
Enrollment limited to 60 and subject to ap- 
proval of the instructor. No auditors. Ordinal 
grading. 



ID 225c. A Case Study in Urban and Industrial 
Health Planning in a Developing Country 

Lectures, small seminars, workshops. Two 
2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Nichols. 
Curative and preventive medicine require- 
ments for a large industrial project and sur- 
rounding city are studied together with essen- 
tial public health support services. Planning 
includes: definition of the problem; descrip- 
tion of health hazards and load on the health 
services; alternate solutions; enabling and 
functional linkages required; functional pro- 
gramming including proximity matrices, 
facilities, staffing, operational support, man- 
agement and administration requirements, 
costing and implementation. 
Enrollment limited to 60 and subject to ap- 
proval of the instructor. No auditors. Ordinal 
grading. 

ID 230c. Health of Community Populations 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Gellhorn. 
Principally targeted for non-physicians with 
interests in biostatistics, epidemiology, health 
policy and management. Briefly introduces 
history of public health and concepts of health, 
then focuses on the common diseases particu- 
larly affecting persons living in poverty or near 
poverty conditions in urban America. Presents 
clinical characteristics of specific illnesses, im- 
pact of socio-economic, cultural and 
environmental factors of ill health. Current 
preventive medicine measures for specific dis- 
ease entities will be evaluated. 
Prereq. ID 104a or equivalent. 

ID 231a, b. Community Diagnosis 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. J. L. Brown. 
Introduces the concept of the community as 
"patient" or "client" to be served by health 
professionals. Provides students with an al- 
ternative broad framework from which to 
analyze communities and their residents as 
well as how to introduce sources of health- 
related information on a community basis. 
Prepares students to apply analytical tools and 
methods to community populations. 
Prereq. Present or past clinical/field experi- 
ence. 



98 Courses of Instruction 



ID 232c, d. Change Strategies at the Commu- 
nity Level 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Brown. 
Assists students in analyzing and understand- 
ing functional aspects of communities, and in 
understanding the role of various institutions 
with respect to health, illness and the quality of 
life in communities. Analyzes variables which 
contribute to success or failure in altering 
health conditions, and the roles which health 
professionals play in altering the health status 
of populations. 

Prereq. Present or past clinical field experi- 
ence. 

ID 235b. Community Health Education 

Lectures, case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Members of the Department. 
Provides students with a theoretical 
:ra~ev.-crk. :cr ur.derstar-.dirg the rr!e c:heal:h 
education in the community. Students exam- 
ine several community health education pro- 
grams, evaluate them against theoretical stan- 
dards, and develop their own health education 
projects based on case studies. 

ID 330e. Field Trip 

Three-day period between fall and spring terms. 1 
unit. Dr. Nichols. 

Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia. 
The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is a 
unique institution with many public health 
functions relevant to the educational and re- 
search interests of domestic and foreign stu- 
dents. 

This field trip will give students an overview of 
the activities of the CDC. as well as an oppor- 
tunity to meet individually with professional 
staff at CDC. Lectures and tutorials are 
provided related to the various disciplines at 
CDC including occupational diseases, surveil- 
lance systems, epidemiology, and control 
measures for both chronic and infectious dis- 
eases, and CDC's role in international health. 
Other topics will be arranged depending on the 
interest of the group. 



Behavioral Sciences 

BEH 132a, b. The American Household in 
Demographic Perspective 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Lectures. Two lV2-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Masnick. 

Examines in the context of longer historical 
trends the recent dramatic changes in familv 
structure brought about by changes in patterns 
of household formation, mamage. separation, 
divorce, remarriage, childbearing, female 
labor force participation, and mortality. Impli- 
cations for elements of the social order receive 
emphasis, including general integration of age 
structure, characteristics of the labor force, 
familial support in health care, and the housing 
market. 

BEH 201b. Health and Behavior: An Introduc- 
tion to Behavioral Aspects of Public Health 

May not be available 1982-43. 
Lectures, discussions. Tiro 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Members of the Department. 
Considers the reciprocal relationship between 
health and behavior. Reviews attitudinal and 
sododemographic factors in preventive health 
activities and disease. 

BEH 202b. Sociological Perspectives in the 
Study of Health Attitudes and Behaviors 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Lectures, seminars. Two lVirhour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Members of the Department. 
Examines the sociological literature on con- 
sumer attitudes, sick-role behavior, preven- 
tion, and illness. Also considers methodolog- 
ical issues specific to this substantive area. 
Prereq. Introductory sociology or equivalent, 
or permission of the instructor. 

Students interested in health promotion and 
health education are recommended to take the 
following sequence. 

BEH 211a. Provides introduction and 
framework. 

BEH 213c. Performs analy sis of determinants of 
behavior. 

BEH 214d. Guides program planning and im- 
plementation. 

BEH 215d. Discusses theories of individual and 
social change. 

BEH 216c, d. Presents case studies in a broad 
range of problem areas. 



BEH 211a. Health Promotion 

May not be available 1982-83. 
Seminars. Tiro 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Members of the Department. 
Discusses the way behavioral and environ- 
mental phenomena influence one another and 
interact to threaten health. Introduces relevant 
theories on the development and change of 
individual and group behavior. Outlines edu- 
cational and organizational strategies for in- 
fluencing social and environmental change. Il- 
lustrations of health promotion in a variety of 
public health problem areas are presented. 

BEH 213c. Behavioral Analysis 

Lectures, discussions. One 3-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Benfari. 
Focuses on the psychological processes affect- 
ing performance and change in individual be- 
havior, such as roles and expectations, percep- 
tion, motivation, communications, stress, and 
life cycle changes. The learning model is based 
upon an experiential approach using cases, 
simulations . and personal involvement. 

BEH 214d. Behavior Lifesty le Change and 
Risk Factor Alteration: Introduction to Meth- 
ods 

Lectures, discussions. One 5-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Benfari. 
Focuses on the planning, implementation, and 
evaluation of intervention programs address- 
ing the primary prevention of disease. Exam- 
ines risk factor reduction and life style changes 
in promoting health. 

BEH 215c. Inducing Social Change 

Seminars. Tiro 1 v z-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Mertens. 

Designed for various specialists in public 
health who are charged with responsibility for 
introducing changes in organizations and 
communities. The subject matter includes 
methods and theories of teaching, principles of 
individual and group psychotherapy, ap- 
proaches to sensitivity training and group 
dynamics, and organizational theory. Tech- 
niques and procedures illustrating these 
theories are presented through readings, dis- 
cussions, and case illustrations. 



Behavioral Sciences 99 



BEH 216c,d. Case Studies in Health 
Promotion. 

May not be available 1982-83. 
Case Studies. One 2-hour session each loeek. 2.5 
units. Members of the Department. 
Examines health promotion education inter- 
ventions in the U.S. and developing nations. 
Teaches techniques of intervention design 
using print and non-print media. Applies 
basic principles of education and social 
psychology. 

BEH 220c, d. The Epidemiology of Pathological 
Behaviors: Problems, Concepts, and Methods 
(formerly BEH 220a, b. Psychiatric Problems in 
Organizations and Industry) 

Seminars. One 3-hour session each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Wechsler. 

Surveys the epidemiology of pathological be- 
haviors and social pathologies. Topics include 
alcoholism and drug addiction, smoking, 
anorexia, suicide, antisocial behavior, and 
psychiatric disorders. Provides an historical 
overview of studies using data from treatment 
services and institutions as well as field studies 
of the general population. 

BEH 221c. Mental Health Factors in Organiza- 
tions and Industry (formerly BEH 220a,b. Psy- 
chiatric Problems in Organizations and Indus- 
try) 

Lectures, readings, case illustrations. One 
2-hour session each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Mertens. 
Covers psychological well-being of entire or- 
ganizations, interpersonal conflict, psycholog- 
ical causes of industrial accidents, industrial 
and organizational stress, and the organization 
of psychological units in industry. 

BEH 222c. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse 

(formerly BEH 222c,d) 

Seminars. Two IVi-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Wechsler. 

Covers the prevalence and etiology of al- 
coholism and alcohol abuse, high-risk groups, 
consequences of alcohol abuse on health, re- 
lationship to accidental injuries, treatment 
and prevention, and public policy issues. 

BEH 223d. Drug Addiction and Drug Abuse 

(formerly BEH 222c,d) 

Seminars, discussions. Two IVz-hour sessions 
each week. 2.5 units. Dr. McAuliffe. 
Covers the prevalence of drug addiction and 
abuse. Topics include epidemiology, effects on 
health, etiology, prevention and treatment, 
and public policy. 



BEH 230c, d. Social and Behavioral Research 
Methods 

Seminars. Two IVi-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Gortmaker, Dr. McAuliffe. 
Covers aspects of behavioral research meth- 
ods, including research design, measurement, 
sampling, data collection, and data analysis. By 
case studies, methodological readings, and 
discussion, students learn the conduct and crit- 
ical evaluation of experiments, surveys, index 
construction, longitudinal research, and ob- 
servational studies. 
Prereq. BIO 201a, b. 

BEH 231c, d. Advanced Social and Behavioral 
Research Methods 

Seminars. Two 1 Vi-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Gortmaker, Dr. McAuliffe. 
Examines advanced topics in aspects of re- 
search design, data collection, measurement, 
and data analysis. For doctoral students, 
evaluators, and others who wish to specialize 
in research. Should be taken with or preceded 
by BEH 230c,d, and BIO 202c,d. 

MCHA-BEH 237c,d. Child Development and 

Social Policy (Education P-220) 

Seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 5 

units. 

Dr. Walker. 

(Course described under Maternal and Child 
Health and Aging.) 

BEH 300a,b,c,d,e. Tutorial Programs 

Time and credit to be arranged. Members of the 
Department. 

Arrangements may be made with individual 
instructors to give a reading course on topics 
not covered in the Department's course offer- 
ings. 

BEH 350. Research Training 

Training in research is available through indi- 
vidual arrangements with the members of the 
Department. 



Biostatistics 

BIO 111c, d. Biostatistics for Medical 
Investigators 

Lectures. Out' 1-hour session each week. 1 unit. 
Dr. Zelen. 

Topics include: role of randomization, replica- 
tion, and local control; planning of scientific 
experiments, therapeutic investigations and 
prognostic factors; concept of a population, 
mean, and variance; confidence procedures for 
one and two population problems; analysis of 
proportions; survival data, life tables, and 
maximum likelihood estimates. 

BIO 113b. Computing Principles and Methods 

Lectures, discussions. Tivo 1-hour sessions each 
week. 

Laboratory. One 1 Vz-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Members of the Department. 
Among the principles and methods of comput- 
ing and data processing included in the course 
are: programming, flow-charting, and the use 
of a statistical program package, a data base 
management system, and computer program 
libraries. Criteria for choosing among existing 
programs are delineated. Case studies used to 
illustrate methods of data collection, coding, 
and data reduction. 

BIO 201a,b. Principles of Biostatistics (form- 
erly BIO 101a,b) 

Lectures. Two 1-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory. One 2-hour session each week. 5 
units. Dr. Drolette. 

Lectures and laboratory exercises acquaint the 
student with the basic concepts of biostatistics, 
their application and interpretation. Topics in- 
clude: descriptive statistics, probability distri- 
butions, inference, tests of significance, asso- 
ciation, and regression. Laboratory groups will 
be organized by areas of academic interest or 
specialization. 

Note: This course cannot be counted as part of 
the credit requirement for a major or minor 
doctoral field. 



100 I Courses of Instruction 



BIO 202c, d. Statistical Methods for 
Epidemiologic Research 

Lectures. Two 1 Vi-hour sessions each -week. 
Laboratory (optional). One 2-hour session each 
week. 5 units. Dr. Ware, Dr. Begg. 
Emphasizes concepts and methods for quan- 
tifying relationships between variables. Stres- 
ses issues in nonexperimental research. Topics 
include: measures of association, confounding 
and interaction, multivariate regression, anal- 
ysis of covariance, one- and two-way analysis 
of variance, analysis of two-by-two con- 
tingency tables, logistic regression, analysis of 
matched pairs, analysis of rates, and survival 
data analysis. 

Prereq. 201a, b or equivalent. 

BIO 203c, d. Statistical Methods in Exper- 
imental Research (formerly BIO 202c, d) 

Lectures. Two Wz-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Feldman. 

Uses extensive examples from laboratory sci- 
ence. Students learn to formulate a scientific 
question in terms of a statistical model, leading 
to objective and quantitative answers. Princi- 
pal topics are analysis of variance and regres- 
sion, including details of data-analytic tech- 
nique and implications for experimental de- 
sign. Also included are probability models and 
some computing. 
Prereq. Bio 201a, b or equivalent. 

BIO 204c,d. Vital and Health Statistics 

Lectures and discussions. One 2-hour session 
each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Drolette. 
Discussion of the types, sources, methods of 
collection and uses of vital and health statistics 
for public health purposes. Effective use of 
existing data will be emphasized together with 
consideration of incomplete data and sampling 
methods for obtaining new information, both 
nationally and internationally. 

BIO 205c, d. Mathematical Foundations of 
Biostatistics 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each iveek. 2.5 
units. Dr. Drolette. 

Material includes: mathematical descriptions 
of commonly used distributions; standard pro- 
cedures for estimating the moments of a distri- 
bution; and mathematical foundations of sta- 
tistical inference, including the Neyman-Pear- 
son lemma, the likelihood ratio, the central 
limit theorem, power and Bayesian inference. 
Prereq. A course in elementary calculus. 



BIO 207c, d. Survey Research Methods in 
Community Health 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Bailar. 
Research design, sample selection, question- 
naire construction, interviewing techniques, 
the reduction and interpretation of data, and 
related facets of population survey investiga- 
tions are covered. Focuses primarily on the ap- 
plication of survey methods to problems of 
health program planning and evaluation. 
Treatment of methodology is sufficiently broad 
to be suitable for students who are concerned 
with epidemiological, nutritional, or other 
types of survey research. 

BIO 210a, b. Topics in Biostatistics 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
•week. 2.5 units. Members of the Department. 
Offered primarily for students majoring in bio- 
statistics or epidemiology, although qualified 
students from other departments are welcome. 
The topics to be covered will vary from vear to 
year, based on recent developments in biosta- 
tistics and the research interests of the in- 
structor. 

For 1982-83, the course will be joint with the 
Department of Epidemiology. 

EPI-BIO 210a,b. Design and Analysis of Case 
Control Studies 

Seminars. Tivo IVz-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Walker, Dr. Ware, Dr. Trichtler. 
(Course described under Epidemiology.) 

BIO 211a, b. Discrete Data Analysis 

Lectures. Tivo Wz-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Laird. 

Deals with the use of log linear and logistic 
models for analyzing counted data. Empha- 
sizes practical application rather than mathe- 
matical theory. Extensive use is made of com- 
puter packages for data analysis. Topics in- 
clude: the analysis of contingency tables, chi- 
square and exact tests, measures of association, 
logistic regression, log linear analysis using 
iterative proportional fitting, and the bino- 
mial, multinomial and Poisson distributions. 
Prereq. A course which includes the analysis of 
variance or permission of the instructor. 

BIO 214c. Principles of Clinical Trials 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Gelber. 
Designed for individuals interested in the sci- 
entific, policy and management aspects of clin- 



ical trials. Topics include: types of clinical re- 
search, study design, treatment allocation, 
randomization and stratification, data man- 
agement and quality control, sample size re- 
quirements, patient consent and interpretation 
of results. Students will design a clinical inves- 
tigation in their own field of interest and will 
critique recently published investigations. 
Prereq. Previous or concurrent enrollment in 
an introductory statistics course. 
Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program Medical 
Dental Track. 

HPM-BIO 216c. Decision Analysis for Health 
and Medical Practices (Public Policy S-176m) 
Lectures, discussions. Two IVz-hour sessions 
each xueek. 2.5 units. Dr. Weinstein. 
(Course described under Health Policy and 
Management.) 

BIO 217a, b. Probability Theory and 
Applications 

Lectures. Two IVi-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Louis. 

A course in probability theory fundamental to 
the statistics program. Topics include: algebra 
of events, axiomatic foundations combinator- 
ial probability, discrete and continuous sample 
spaces, Lebesgue integration, conditional 
probability and independence, random varia- 
bles, generating functions and characteristic 
functions, standard distributions, expectation 
and variance operators, limit theorems, Pois- 
son processes, and applications in health- 
related areas. 

Prereq. Intermediate calculus (one or two 
semesters beyond elementary calculus). 

BIO 218c, d. Statistical Inference 

Lectures. Two IVz-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Tsiatis. 

A fundamental course in statistical inference. 
Topics include: methods of estimation, least 
squares, maximum likelihood, Bayesian meth- 
ods, properties of estimates, confidence proce- 
dures, significance testing, likelihood ratio 
tests, goodness of fit tests, Neyman-Pearson 
theory, sufficiency, power and optimality, se- 
quential analysis, nonparametric inference, 
and decision theory. The theory will be illus- 
trated with examples from health-related re- 
search. 

Prereq. BIO 217a, b or equivalent. 



Biostatistics / 101 



HI'M-BIO 219b,c, 219d. Statistical Methods 
for Health Policy and Management 

Lectures. Three 2-hour sessions each week plus 

one optional discussion session. 7.5 units. 

Dr. Lavin, Dr. Feldstein. 

(Course described under Health Policy and 

Management.) 

BIO 220c, d. Multivariate Analysis for 
Quantitative Data 

To be given 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Lectures, student presentations. Two 1V2-hour 
sessions each week. 5 units. 
Topics include: Hotelling's T : , principal com- 
ponent and factor analysis, discriminant func- 
tions, clustering, and canonical correlation, 
with some discussion of distribution theory 
and tests of hypotheses. Students will partici- 
pate in the analysis of a data set. 
Prereq. At least one statistics course beyond 
the level of BIO 201a, b, knowledge of matrices, 
and some familiarity with computer packages 
such as SPSS, BMD, or SAS. 

BIO 240c, d. Design of Experiments 

(Statistics 140) 

To be given 1982-83; offered alternate years. 
Lectures. Two IVi-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Zelen. 

Examines general principles and practical dif- 
ficulties in controlled experimentation. Topics 
include: introduction to randomization theory, 
methods for increasing precision, principal 
types of designs, mixed and random effects 
models, and variance component estimation. 
Intended for students with a primary interest 
in statistics and biostatistics. 
Prereq. One or more courses covering the basic 
concepts of distributions, expectations, sam- 
ples, testing, estimation, regression, and anal- 
ysis of variance. 

BIO 251a,b. Data Analysis 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 5 units. Members of the Department. 
Discusses the statistical techniques necessary 
for analyzing data from clinical and biological 
studies. The concepts underlying statistical 
techniques are stressed rather than numerical 
calculation or mathematical derivation. 
Prereq. Permission of the instructor. 



BIO 261c,d. Theory of Biometry I 

Lectures. Tiuo IVi-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Lagakos. 

Discusses the theoretical basis of concepts and 
methodologies associated with life tables, the 
general theory of survival distributions and 
censoring, competing risk models, and the 
planning of clinical trials. Material is drawn 
from recent literature. 

Prereq. BIO 21 1 or equivalent, or permission of 
the instructor. 

BIO 262a,b. Theory of Biometry II 

Lectures, discussions. Two \ l /i-hour sessions 
each week. 5 units. Dr. Zelen. 
A continuation of BIO 261c, d. Topics include: 
semi-Markov processes as models for disease 
processes; models of early disease detection; 
length-biased sampling; optimization and 
periodic screening; design and analysis of car- 
cinogenicity experiments; low-dose extrapola- 
tion; and methods for combining evidence 
from different experiments. 
Prereq. BIO 261c, d. 

BIO 263c, d. Regression and Analysis of 
Variance 

Lectures. Three 1-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Mehta. 

Examines the methods of least squares and 
maximum likelihood as applied to linear 
statistical models: multivariate regression, 
calibration, analysis of variance, and random 
effects models. Topics include: the develop- 
ment of hypothesis testing, confidence inter- 
vals and Bayesian techniques. Exercises and 
examples emphasize medical applications. 
Prereq. A course in statistics at the level of BIO 
218c, d or Statistics 110; familiarity with matrix 
algebra. 

BIO 273a,b. Introduction to Computing 

Lectures. Two IVi-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory. One 2-hour session each week. 5 
units. Dr. Trichtler. 

Introduces the fundamentals of computing, 
emphasizing algorithms, information flow, 
and the systematic design of programs in 
higher-level languages such as FORTRAN. 
Topics include: the structure of digital com- 
puters, programming languages, algorithm 
development and usage, systems of analysis, 
and systematic design of programs and com- 
puting systems. 



BIO 274c,d. Statistical Computing 

To be given 1982-83; offered alternate years. 
Lectures. Two 1 Vi-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory. One IVi-hour session each week. 5 
units. Dr. Pagano. 

Enables students to understand, properly use, 
and possibly develop statistical algorithms or 
software. Topics are prompted by statistical 
procedures or biomedical applications, and in- 
clude: computer arithmetic, error analysis, 
numerical techniques, equation solving, ma- 
trix operations, approximation and smooth- 
ing, optimization, and simulation modeling. 
Prereq. BIO 273a, b or equivalent, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

BIO 275c,d. Applied Data Management 

To be given 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Lectures, demonstrations. Two IVi-hour ses- 
sions each week. 

Laboratory. One IVi-hour session each week. 5 
units. Dr. Tritchler. 

Introduces management of data, both external 
and internal, to computer data bases, concepts 
and techniques for handling data before it is 
ready for analysis, and practical aspects of 
computer data base design and usage. Topics 
include: data collection, forms and coding, 
data entry systems, quality control, data base 
structures (both logical and physical), data 
base management systems, file organization, 
and data models. 

Prereq. BIO 273a, b or equivalent, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 



102 Courses of Instruction 



BIO 310-315a,b,c,d. Tutorial Programs 

Time and credit to be arranged. Members of the 
Department. 

An opportunity- for tutorial work is offered for 
interested and qualified students or small 
groups of students. Arrangements must be 
made with individual faculty members and are 
limited by the amount of faculty time available. 
These programs are open to students specializ- 
ing in biostatistics and also to students in other 
fields who wish to go beyond the content of the 
regular courses. Six broad categories of this 
tutorial instruction are identified by the six 
course numbers below. 

310 Statistical Methods 

Guided study in specific areas of statisti- 
cal methodology and application, includ- 
ing participation in the Departmental 
Journal Club. 

311 Teaching 

Work with the Department in laboratory 
instruction and the development of 
teaching materials. 

312 Consultation 

Work with members of the Department 
on current statistical consultation ac- 
tivities. 

313 Computing 

Guided study in scientific programming, 
numerical methods, and data manage- 
ment. 

314 Study Design 

Guidance in developing statistical design 
of a study in which the student has a 
particular interest. 

315 Data Analysis 

Guidance in the statistical analysis of a 
body of data in which the student is in- 
terested. 

Students may register for BIO 310-315 for a 
maximum of five credit units in the summer 
term. 

BIO 350. Research 

Candidates for the Doctor of Public Health, 
Doctor of Science, or other doctoral degrees 
may arrange for individual research. The work 
may be part of the program for a doctorate in 
this Department or may be integrated with 
doctoral research in other departments. 



Environmental Health 
Interdepartmental Courses 

The following courses are conducted by the 
faculty and staff of the Kresge Center for Envi- 
ronmental Health, which includes the Depart- 
ments of Environmental Health Sciences, 
Physiology, Sanitary Engineering, and the Oc- 
cupational Health Program. 

EHI 201a, 201c. Principles of Environmental 
Health I 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Moeller. 

Represents a first step in a review of the more 
important environmental health problems 
facing society. Topics include: environmental 
physiology, radiation protection, community 
air pollution, occupational health, and 
municipal water purification and wastewater 
treatment. Students will be required to de- 
velop and submit plans for a term paper. 
Note: Students in the M.P.H. program are re- 
quired to take this course, plus either EHI 202b 
or 203d. For convenience in scheduling, EHI 
201 is offered in both the "a" and "c" periods. 

EHI 202b. Principles of Environmental Health 
II 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Moeller. 

Represents a continuation in the review of the 
more important environmental health prob- 
lems facing society. Topics include: energy and 
the environment, environmental toxicology 
and hazardous waste management, 
environmental law and economics, accidents 
and public health, insect and rodent control, 
and environmental monitoring. Submission of 
a completed term paper is required. 
Note: Students in the M.P.H. program are re- 
quired to take either this course or EHI 203d, 
plus EHI 201. Enrollment in EHI 202b is rec- 
ommended for students specializing in one or 
more of the programs of the Department of 
Environmental Health Sciences. 

EHI 203d. Principles of Environmental Health 
III 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Moeller. 

Emphasizes environmental health problems in 
the less developed countries. Topics include: 
individual household water supplies and 
wastewater treatment; basic sanitation; insect 
and rodent control; nutrition and foodbome 



diseases; housing and home accidents; opera- 
tion, maintenance and management of 
environmental systems; environmental man- 
power and training; and the selection of ap- 
propriate technology for coping with such 
problems. Submission of a completed term 
paper is required. 

Note: Students in the M.P.H. program are re- 
quired to take either this course or EHI 202b, 
plus EHI 201. Because of the special orientation 
of the subject matter presented, it is suggested 
that students interested in environmental 
health problems in the less developed coun- 
tries enroll in EHI 203d. Students interested in 
the subject matter in this course, as well as that 
presented in EHI 202b, may take both courses, 
as well as EHI 201, and receive credit for all 
three courses (7.5 units). 

EHI 204a, b. Ergonomics Human Factors 

Lectures, demonstrations. One 2-hour session 
each week. 2 units. Dr. Snook. 
Emphasizes the design of the job to fit the 
worker. Specific problems are investigated 
which result from the nature of the job itself, 
e.g., low back injuries, fatigue, hand disor- 
ders, slips and falls, human error, and psycho- 
logical stress. The physiological, psychologi- 
cal, and anatomical characteristics of the 
worker are considered in the development of 
good job design principles. 

EHI 206a, b. Introduction to Occupational 
Medicine 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. 

Optional laboratory (Occupational Health 
Clinic). One 3-hour session each week. 2.5 units. 
Dr. Baker. 

Reviews the diagnosis and management of oc- 
cupational diseases following exposure to spe- 
cific workplace substances, including asbes- 
tos, lead, organic solvents, and other sub- 
stances. Methods of diagnosis of early organ 
system effects of chemicals and techniques for 
assessing disability will be considered. The 
course is limited to physicians or others with 
adequate training by permission of the in- 
structor. 

Laboratory is limited to physicians and con- 
sists of supervised clinical work in one or two 
occupational health clinics. 



Environmental Health Interdepartmental 103 



EHI 207a, b. Policy Issues in Occupational 
Health 

Seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Boden. 

Examines the legal, economic, and political 
foundations of occupational health activities in 
the United States. Enables students to develop 
the knowledge and skills in the above areas 
necessary to apply medical, industrial hygiene, 
and statistical skills to achieve a healthful 
workplace. The roles of government, unions, 
corporations, and research organizations are 
discussed. 

EHI 211a, b. Critical Review of the Scientific 
Basis for Occupational Standards 

Seminars. Tivo 2-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Wegman, Dr. Baker, Dr. Smith. 
Designed to provide students with the oppor- 
tunity to review the scientific basis for the as- 
sociation of selected occupational exposures 
with disease. Special emphasis is placed on 
critical evaluations of the literature. Reviews 
occupational cancer and respiratory disease, 
pathophysiology of respiratory disease and 
epidemiologic approaches to chemical car- 
cinogenesis. Attention will be directed specif- 
ically to the interface of science and regulatory 
standards. 

Enrollment limited to 15. 
Prereq. EPI 201a or 221a,b, BIO 201a,b, EHI 
251c, d, or permission of the instructors. EPI 
212c, d recommended. 

EHI 251c,d. Basic Problems in Occupational 
Health and Industrial Environments 

(Engineering 282) 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory demonstrations, field trips. One 
3-hour session each week. 5 units. Dr. Ferris, Dr. 
Baker, Mr. Burgess, Dr. Smith, Dr. Wegman. 
Lectures, laboratory demonstrations, and in- 
spections of workplaces show the relation of 
working conditions to health, with special ref- 
erence to the recognition, measurement, and 
control of hazards. Examples include adverse 
conditions of temperature, humidity, radia- 
tion, and chemical and physical irritants. Par- 
ticular emphasis is given to the prevention, 
diagnosis, and treatment of industrial dis- 
ability and disease. 
Prereq. PHY 203a, b. 



EHI 254b. Introduction to Industrial Hygiene 

Lectures, seminars, laboratories. One 2-hour 
session each week. 1.25 units. Dr. Ellenbecker, 
Dr. Smith. 

Intended for physicians, nurses, and other 
health professionals who will work with indus- 
trial hygienists in a variety of settings. De- 
signed to familiarize these professionals with 
the methods used by the industrial hygienist in 
the prevention of occupational disease, 
thereby promoting a more effective working 
relationship. Topics include: the physical form 
of air contaminants, air sampling and analysis, 
engineering controls, and the preparation of 
survey protocols. 

EHI 330e. Field Work 

One-week period between fall and spring terms. 1 
unit. 

A week of supervised field observation is of- 
fered to students who may choose appropriate 
visits to medical or industrial hygiene depart- 
ments of industries, airports, and other agen- 
cies which have operations or research in the 
field of environmental health. Field work ar- 
rangements are generally made early in the fall 
term. 



Environmental Health Sciences 

EHS-HPM 210a. Introduction to Operations 
Management (formerly EHS 211a.) 
Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Cooper, Dr. Shepard, Dr. 
Evans. 

Emphasizes quantitative and descriptive 
methods for decision making in environmental 
and health management. Serves as an introduc- 
tion to operations management, planning, 
forecasting, optimization, and control. 

EHS 213a, b. Occupational Safety Science 

Lectures, discussions. Two 1-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Keyserling. 
Covers the fundamental principles of occupa- 
tional safety science. Topics include: theoreti- 
cal models of accident causation, accident in- 
vestigation procedures, systems analysis, 
safety standards, safety performance meas- 
urement, and product safety. Emphasizes the 
use of engineering controls and administrative 
practices to alleviate workplace hazads. 

EHS 214c, J. Occupational Biomechanics and 
Work Physiology 

Lectures. Two l-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory. Three 2-hour sessions during course. 
2.5 units. Dr. Keyserling. 
Principles and occupational applications of 
biomechanics and exercise physiology are pre- 
sented. Topics include: muscle anatomy and 
physiology, musculoskeletal mechanics, etiol- 
ogy of occupational musculoskeletal injuries 
and disorders, energy requirements of work, 
and systemic responses to work. Emphasizes 
the use of biomechanical and metabolic models 
to evaluate occupational stresses and establish 
safe work practices. 

Enrollment limited to 30. Preference given to 
students in the Occupational Health Program 
(required for students in Industrial Hygiene/ 
Safety). 

Prereq. PHY 203a, b or equivalent. 

EHS 251c. Environmental Control: Industrial 
Ventilation (Engineering 280) 
Lectures. Two 1-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory. One 3-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Mr. Burgess, Dr. Ellenbecker. 
Intended for industrial hygiene and air pollu- 
tion students. Covers the design and evalua- 
tion of local exhaust ventilation systems for the 
control of toxic air contaminants released into 
the workplace by industrial operations and 
processes. 



104 / Courses of Instruction 



EHS 252d. Noise and Vibration Control 

(Engineering 280) 

Lectures. Two 1-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory. Four 3-hour sessions. 2.5 units. Dr. 
Ellenbecker, Dr. Cudworth, Mr. Cavanaugh 
(Consultant in Acoustics). 
Introduces the fundamentals of sound and vi- 
bration generation, transmission, and recep- 
tion. Emphasizes the control of environmental 
noise hazards in industrial workplaces. Basic 
measurement instrumentation and techniques 
will be introduced with practical exercises. 
Noise hazard control methodology will be ex- 
plored by means of lectures, demonstrations, 
and field trips to laboratories and industrial 
plants. 

EHS 253a, b. Aerosol Technology (Engineering 
286) 

Lectures. Two 1-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory. One 2-hour session each week, "a" 
period; one 4-hour session each week, "b" period. 
5 units. Dr. Hinds. 

Covers the properties of suspended particulate 
matter (dust, smoke, clouds) and the physical 
principles underlying its behavior. Topics in- 
clude: particle motion due to gravitational, 
thermal, and electrostatic forces; diffusion; 
impaction; coagulation; filtration; condensa- 
tion and evaporation; optical properties; and 
sizing statistics. Laboratories cover optical and 
electron microscopy, sampling, and mass con- 
centration and particle size measurement. 
Required for concentrators in industrial hy- 
giene and air pollution control. 

EHS 255a. Health Hazards of Manufacturing 
Processes 

Lectures, field trips. One 2-hour and one 3-hour 
session each week. 2.5 units. Mr. Burgess, Mem- 
bers of the Department. 

Deals with the recognition of health hazards in 
the workplace and the atmospheric environ- 
ment, using a unit operations approach to 
manufacturing processes. Designed as an in- 
troduction to other courses which consider the 
evaluation and control of hazardous conditions 
in the workplace and atmospheric environ- 
ment. 

Enrollment limited to 30 and subject to ap- 
proval of the instructor. Preference given to 
students in the Department of Environmental 
Health Sciences and the Occupational Health 
Program. 



EHS 261d. Community Air Pollution 

(Engineering 284) 

Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Spengler, Dr. First. 
Air quality standards; health effects; damage to 
animals, plants, and property; community and 
site surveys; the legal and enforcement aspects 
of air pollution control. 

Prereq. EHS 255a, EHS 262b, EHS 264c, d (may 
be taken concurrently), or permission of the 
instructors. 

EHS 262b. Meteorological Aspects of Air 
Pollution (Engineering 285) 
Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Spengler. 
Provides the student with a general under- 
standing of the present status of local and 
long-range dispersion modeling. Also presents 
an evaluation of the meteorological factors as- 
sociated with the transport, transformation, 
dispersion, and removal of air pollutants. Stu- 
dents will learn to recognize and define the 
parameters of elements in the atmosphere af- 
fecting pollutant dispersion and to calculate 
concentration fields downwind of pollutant 
sources. 

Prereq. Knowledge of calculus. 

EHS 264c, d. Identification and Measurement 
of Air Contaminants (Engineering 283) 
Lectures. Two 1-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory. One 3-hour session each week. 5 
units. Dr. Smith, Members of the Department. 
Emphasizes sampling and analytical methods 
for air contaminants plus related subjects. In- 
cluded are: chemical and instrumental 
methods of air analysis, sampling statistics, 
biological agents, radioactive aerosol deter- 
minations, air pollution surveys, and indust- 
rial hygiene evaluations. 

Required for concentrators in industrial hy- 
giene, air pollution control, radiological 
health, and occupational safety programs. 
Prereq. EHS 253a, b or permission of instruc- 
tor. 



EHS 265c, d. Air and Gas Cleaning 

(Engineering 289) 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 
Laboratory. One 4-hour session each week. 5 
units. Dr. Leith, Dr. Ellenbecker, Members of 
the Department. 

Theory, selection, application, and testing of 
gas-cleaning devices. Particle collection by in- 
ertial, centrifugal, electrostatic, and other 
forces; gas absorption in liquids, adsorption 
on solids, and incineration. Laboratory exper- 
iments illustrate principles involved. 
Prereq. EHS 253a, b. 

HPM-EHS 267a,b. Political Economy of 
Environmental Health Regulations 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 5 units. Dr. Roberts, Dr. Repetto, Dr. 
Thomas, Dr. Landy. 

(Course described under Health Policy and 
Management.) 

HPM-EHS 269c,d. Environmental Health 
Policy Analysis 

Lectures, case discussions. Two 2-hour sessions 
each week. 5 units. Dr. Cooper, Dr. Thomas, Dr. 
Roberts. 

(Course described under Health Policy and 
Management.) 

EHS 271a, b. Introduction to Radiation 
Protection (Engineering 288) 
Lectures, demonstrations. One 2-hour and one 
1-hour session each week. 5 units. Dr. Shapiro, 
Dr. Moeller. 

Covers laboratory, industrial, and environ- 
mental sources of radiation; the interaction of 
ionizing particles with matter; the concept of 
radiation dose from external and internal 
sources; radiation measurements; radiation 
protection standards and regulations; and 
methods of environmental and occupational 
radiation protection. (Students desiring labo- 
ratory experience in the use of radiation 
measuring instruments should enroll concur- 
rently in EHS 272b.) 



Environmental Health Sciences / 105 



EHS 272b. Introduction to Radiation 
Instrumentation 

Laboratory. One 2-hour session each week. 1.25 
units. Dr. Shapiro. 

Provides an introduction to the use of radiation 
measuring equipment and supplements the 
material presented in EHS 271a, b. Exercises 
cover radiation counting, gamma spectros- 
copy, and the use and calibration of radiation 
survey instruments. (This course is available to 
students in EHS 271a, b who desire laboratory 
experience in the use of radiation measuring 
instruments.) 

Enrollment limited and subject to approval of 
the instructor. 

Prereq. Previous or concurrent enrollment in 
EHS 271a,b. 

EHS 273c, d. Concepts and Issues in Radiation 
Protection 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
iveek. 2.5 units. Dr. Moeller, Dr. Shapiro. 
Involves detailed study of current handbooks 
and publications related to radiation protec- 
tion. Areas covered include the regulation of 
radiation use and the evaluation and control of 
radiation hazards. Specific topics include: reg- 
ulatory guides and standards, safety evalua- 
tion reports, evaluation of operating experi- 
ence, risk assessment and emergency plan- 
ning. 

A term report is required. 
Prereq. EHS 271a, b and permission of the in- 
structors. 

EHS 274c, d. Radiation Protection in Medicine 

Lectures. One 2-hour and one l-hour session each 
week. 

Laboratory. One 3-hour session each week. Time 
to be arranged. 5 units. Dr. Webster. 
Covers the fundamentals of x-ray equipment, 
the design of x-ray installations, and proce- 
dures for radiation protection surveys and in- 
spections. Included in the course are associated 
problems in nuclear medicine and teletherapy. 
Considerations include: equipment and room 
design, with emphasis on items such as leak- 
age, collimation, filtration, primary and sec- 
ondary barriers, contamination control, work- 
load, and protection of patients. 



EHS 301-306a,b,c,d,e. Tutorial Programs 

Reading or research. Time and credit to be ar- 
ranged. 

Reading or research assignments for individ- 
ual tutorial work at a master's degree level are 
provided for qualified students in the fields 
of industrial hygiene, industrial ventilation, 
aerosol technology, radiological health, medi- 
cal radiation physics, nuclear medicine, solid 
waste management, air pollution control, and 
environmental health management. 

301 Air Pollution 

Dr. Cooper, Dr. First, Dr. Leith, Dr. 
Spengler. 

302 Industrial Hygiene 

Mr. Burgess, Dr. Ellenbecker, Dr. Hinds, 
Dr. Smith. 

303 Radiological Health 

Dr. Moeller, Dr. Shapiro. 

304 Medical Physics 

Dr. Bjarngard, Dr. Webster. 

305 Solid Wastes 
Dr. First. 

306 Environmental Health and Toxic Material 
Management 

Dr. Cooper, Dr. Moeller. 
Enrollment subject to approval of the Chair- 
man of the Department. 

EHS 350-362. Research 

Facilities of the Department are available for 
doctoral candidates and properly qualified 
second-year master's degree students to pur- 
sue independent research on problems in in- 
dustrial hygiene, aerosol technology, solid 
waste management, air pollution control, and 
radiological health. Areas currently receiving 
study in the Department are as follows: 

351 Dr. Smith 

Evaluation of performance factors of re- 
spiratory protective devices; monitoring 
exposures of occupational groups to toxic 
air contaminants; ventilation control of 
airborne contaminants; evaluation and 
control of noise. 

352 Dr. First 

Application of gas- and liquid-phase re- 
actions to particulate and gas removal; 
development and design of cleanup sys- 
tems for airborne contaminants from in- 
dustrial and nuclear power plant facili- 
ties; incineration of solid wastes includ- 
ing municipal, radioactive, biological, 
and laboratory materials. 



353 Dr. Leith 

Measuring and modeling the perform- 
ance of industrial gas cleaning equip- 
ment; assessing the air pollution poten- 
tial of simple and complex pollution 
sources. 

354 Dr. Spengler 

Personal exposure monitoring and mod- 
eling of air pollutants; risk analysis; 
health effects of air pollutants. 

355 Dr. Cooper 

Experimental and theoretical research in 
aerosol generation, measurement, be- 
havior, and control; quantitative meth- 
ods of environmental management. 

356 Dr. Moeller 

Reduction of population dose from 
sources of natural origin; environmental 
protection for nuclear facilities; radiation 
safety criteria and standards. 

357 Dr. Hinds 

Sampling and analysis of aerosol particles 
both in the ambient atmosphere and 
under laboratory conditions; generation 
of monodisperse aerosols; uses of aero- 
sols in environmental health; develop- 
ment of particulate removal equipment. 

358 Dr. Shapiro 

Evaluation and control of hazards from 
radioactive contamination; radiation 
dosimetry. 

359 Dr. Bjarngard 

Medical radiation physics with emphasis 
on dosimetry, nuclear medicine, and 
radiation therapy. 

360 Dr. Webster 

Medical radiation physics with emphasis 
on survey techniques, instrumentation, 
and image quality and patient dose re- 
duction in diagnostic radiology. 

361 Dr. Keyserling 

Prevention of overt and cumulative occu- 
pational trauma; evaluation of jobs for 
biomechanical and physiological stres- 
ses; computer modelling of human 
strength; ergonomic applications to job 
design. 

362 Dr. Ellenbecker 

Engineering control of occupational ex- 
posures; ventilation system design and 
evaluation; fundamental principles un- 
derlying the performance of air pollution 
control equipment. 
Enrollment subject to approval of the Chair- 
man of the Department. 



106 Courses of Instruction 



The following courses, offered in the Harvard 
Faculties of Arts and Sciences and Govern- 
ment, and at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, are open to qualified students 
from the School of Public Health and may be of 
interest to students of environmental health 
sciences. 

Economics 1010c. Microeconomic Theory 

Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 8:30-10. 
Ericson. 

Prereq. Elementary calculus. 

Economics 1551. The Political Economy of 
Environmental Quality 

Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., at 12. 
Dorfman. 

Prereq. Social Analysis 10 or permission of in- 
structor. 

M-lll. Analysis for Decision Making 

Half course (spring term). M, W., 8:30-10. 

S-482. Seminar: Science, Technology, and 
Public Policy 

Half course (spring term). M., 2-4. Brooks, 
Cohen, Zinberg. 

M.I.T. 1.143J. Mathematical Optimization 
Techniques 

Nine units (fall term). Hours to be arranged. 
D. H. Marks. 

M.I.T. 1.146. Engineering Systems Analysis 

Nine units (fall term). Hours to be arranged. R. 
DeNeufville and J. P. Clark. 

M.I.T. 1.811J. Environmental Law: Pollution 
Control 

Nine units (fall term). Ashford and Heaton. 

M.I.T. 1.812J. Regulation of Health and the 
Environment: Selected Topics 

Nine units (spring term). Hours to be arranged. 
Ashford, Hattis and Heaton. 

M.I.T. 14.121. Microeconomic Theory I 

Six units (fall term). Hours to be arranged (first 
half term only). Solow and Fisher. 

M.I.T. 15.065. Decision Analysis 

Nine units (fall and spring terms). Hours to be 
arranged. Kaufman. 



M.I.T. 15.081). Introduction to Mathematical 
Programming 

Twelve units ( fall and spring terms). Hours to be 
arranged. Orlin and Gallager. 

M.I.T. 22.37. Environmental Impact of Electric 
Power Production 

Twelve units ( spring term). Hours to be arranged. 
Golay. 



Epidemiology 

Note: Either EPI 201a or EPI 221a, b satisfies 
the requirement of an introductory course in 
epidemiology. However, individual programs 
may require one or the other. 

EPI 201a. Introduction to Epidemiology 

Lectures and seminars. Two 1-hour and one 
2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 units. 
Dr. Morrison. 

An introduction to epidemiology as a research 
discipline. Emphasis on basic epidemiologic 
principles and methods, with some descrip- 
tion of the patterns of disease prevailing in the 
United States. This course leads into EPI 202b 
and is recommended for all students who wish 
to take more than the minimum School re- 
quirement in epidemiology. Students should 
feel comfortable with simple algebra. Credit 
cannot be received for both this course and 
EPI 221a b. 

EPI 202b. Principles of Epidemiology I: 
Elements of Study Design and Data Analysis 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Rothman. 

For students at the master's level who wish to 
acquire a familiarity with epidemiologic meth- 
ods. The principles of study design and data 
analysis are presented with examples and exer- 
cises. The emphasis is on practical rather than 
theoretical issues. May serve as an introduc- 
tion to more advanced study or as a final course 
for those desiring a working familiarity with 
epidemiologic methods. 

Prereq. Knowledge of calculus and EPI 201a or 
permission of the instructor. 

EPI 203c. Principles of Epidemiology II: 
Problem Conceptualization and Study 
Design 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 4 units. 
Dr. Miettinen. 

The course covers in a rigorous fashion the 
objects of epidemiologic research and the 
goals, options, and decision principles in 
study design. Intended for students preparing 
for a research career. 

Prereq. EPI 202b or permission of the in- 
structor. 



Epidemiology / 107 



EPI 204d. Principles of Epidemiology III: 
Data Analysis and Inference 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 3 units. 
Dr. Miettinen. 

The course covers in a rigorous fashion the 
principles of hypothesis testing and estimation 
in epidemiologic research. Intended for stu- 
dents preparing for a research career. 
Prereq. BIO 202c,d or 205c,d and EPI 202b, or 
permission of the instructor. 

EPI 205c, d. Practice of Epidemiology 

Tutorials, seminars. Tutorial sessions during "c" 
period; one 2-hour seminar each week during " d" 
period. 2.5 units. Dr. Rothman, Dr. Gutensohn, 
Dr. Walker. 

The seminars consist of student presentations 
of plans for and analyses of epidemiologic data, 
with discussion by students and faculty. Prep- 
aratory work is done under tutorial ar- 
rangements with members of the faculty. For 
the analyses, the emphasis will be on concep- 
tual issues and not on execution. 
Prereq. EPI 202b and permission of the instruc- 
tor. Enrollment limited to 16 students. 

EPI 206c, d. Topics in the Theory of 
Epidemiology 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Hutchison, Members of the Depart- 
ment. 

For students who expect to conduct epidemio- 
logic research. Consists of lectures on topics 
that are not part of the basic methodology 
covered in other courses in the Department. 
Topics include: sampling, factors affecting re- 
sponse, data handling, analysis of time-place 
clustering, cyclic variation, survival, and prob- 
lems of distinguishing genetic and environ 
mental components of a disease. 
Prereq. EPI 201a or 221a, b and BIO 201a, b, or 
equivalent. 



EPI-BIO 210a, b. Design and Analysis of Case 
Control Studies 

Seminars. Two lVi-hour sessions per week. 5 
units. Dr. Walker, Dr. Ware. 
An examination of current analytic options in 
case-control studies, and the constraints in 
study design imposed by those options. Stu- 
dents will gain proficiency in both "desk-top" 
procedures, and multivariate procedures, 
principally those based on logistic regression. 
Students should have mastery of elementary 
statistical theory, competence in discrete data 
analysis, and familiarity with underlying prin- 
ciples of epidemiologic studies. 
Permission of the instructor required. 
Prereq. BIO 211, EPI 204 (may be waived for 
students satisfying the above). 

EPI 211b. Epidemiology of Chronic Disease: 
Psychiatric Disorders (formerly EPI 211c) 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 1.25 
units. Dr. Klerman. 

Surveys recent development of standardized 
methods for psychiatric case diagnosis and 
their application to the epidemiologic study of 
specific disorders. Emphasis will be given to 
schizophrenia, depression and affective disor- 
ders, alcoholism, drug abuse, emotional prob- 
lems in children, and psychiatric disabilities in 
the aging. 

EPI 212d. Epidemiology of Chronic 
Disease: Cardiovascular and Respiratory 
Disease (formerly EPI 211d) 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 1.25 
units. Dr. Hutchison. 

A review of the epidemiology of the chronic 
cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. De- 
mographic distribution and time trends of 
these diseases are presented, and known risk 
factors are discussed. 

EPI 213c. Epidemiology of Cancer (formerly 
EPI 211c) 

Lectures. Two 1-hour sessions per week. 1.25 
units. Dr. Morrison. 

A review of some relationships central to 
cancer epidemiology. Topics include: the de- 
scriptive epidemiology of cancer, selected car- 
cinogenic effects of smoking, occupational ex- 
posures, radiation, hormones, and infection, 
and the role of nonmalignant lesions in the 
development of cancer. Both scientific and 
preventive implications will be discussed. 
Prereq. EPI 201a or EPI 221a,b. 



EPI 214d. Cancer Screening (formerly EPI 211c) 

Lectures. Two 1-hour sessions per week. 1.25 
units. Dr. Morrison. 

A review of principles and results of popula- 
tion screening for the control of malignant dis- 
eases. Discussion of the natural history of 
cancer, characteristics of screening tests, 
evaluation of early diagnosis and treatment, 
and the methods and results of screening for 
cancers of several sites including the breast, 
cervix, lung and colon. 
Prereq. EPI 202b. 

EPI 215c, d. Environmental and Occupational 
Epidemiology (formerly EPI 212c,d) 
Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Monson. 
This course has three objectives: (1) to review 
methods used in evaluating the health effects 
of physical and chemical agents in the envi- 
ronment, (2) to review available evidence on 
the health effects of such exposures, and (3) to 
consider policy questions raised by the scien- 
tific evidence. Includes lectures on meth- 
odology, seminars on the review and criticism 
of current literature, and presentations by out- 
side experts on the evaluation and impact of 
epidemiologic data. 

Prereq. EPI 201a or 221a, b and BIO 201a, b. 

NUT-EPI 216a,b. Nutritional Epidemiology 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. el Lozy, Dr. Willett, Mrs. Witschi. 
(Course described under Nutrition.) 

EPI 221a,b. Epidemiology in Public Health 

Two 1-hour lectures, alternating with one 1-hour 
lecture, one 2-hour seminar . 2.5 units. Dr. Guten- 
sohn, Dr. MacMahon. 

An introduction to the role of epidemiology in 
public health and disease control. Basic 
epidemiologic principles and methods are 
dealt with at an introductory level using exam- 
ples primarily drawn from chronic disease. 
Seminars provide practical experience in the 
critical interpretation of epidemiologic 
studies. Recommended for students who do 
not plan to take more than the minimum School 
requirement in epidemiology. Students who 
plan to take advanced epidemiology courses 
should take 201a. 



108 Courses of Instruction 



EPI 300a,b,c,d,e. Tutorial Programs 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Students may participate in departmental re- 
search in close association with a staff member. 
Time and credit are to be arranged with the 
Chairman of the Department. 

EPI 350. Research 

In selecting topics for research in doctoral pro- 
grams, students should consider the fields in 
which members of the Department are cur- 
rently working. These include: 
Neoplastic Disease 

Dr. MacMahon, Dr. Gutensohn, Dr. Hutch- 
ison, Dr. Monson, Dr. Morrison, Dr. 
Rothman, Dr. Walker. 
Congenital Malformation 
Dr. MacMahon, Dr. Miettinen, 
Dr. Rothman, Dr. Yen. 
Cardiovascular Disease 
Dr. Rothman, Dr. Miettinen. 
Effects of Contraceptive Agents 
Dr. Rothman. 
Environmental Epidemiology 
Dr. Monson. 
Statistical Methods 
Dr. Miettinen. 
Nutritional Epidemiology 
Dr. Willett. 

Virus-associated Chronic Disease 
Dr. Gutensohn. 



Health Policy and Management 

HPM 100a, b. Policy I: Economic Analysis 

Lectures, seminars. Three 2-hour sessions each 
week. 7.5 units. Dr. Hemenway. 
Designed to bring students to an intermed- 
iate-level understanding of economic theory. 
Emphasizes the uses and limitations of the mi- 
croeconomic approach. 

Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program. 
May be taken for credit by students who pre- 
viously have taken HPM 205a, b only with per- 
mission of the instructor. 

HPM 205a, b. Economic Analysis for Public 
Health 

Lectures, discussions. Two IVz-hour sessions 
each week. 5 units. Dr. Hemenway. 
Provides an introduction to the basic princi- 
ples of economics and economic analysis, par- 
ticularly as they apply in the public health 
field. A systematic introduction to microeco- 
nomic theory includes the determinants of 
supply and demand, the theory of markets, and 
the concept of economic efficiency. Specific 
topics in health care economics include insur- 
ance, hospital behavior, and the market for 
physician services. 

May not be taken for credit by students 
enrolled in the two-year Health Policy and 
Management Program or by students who pre- 
viously have taken HPM 100a, b. 

HPM 207a,b. Economics of Health Policy 

Lectures, discussions. Two lVi-hour sessions 
each week. 5 units. Mr. Hsiao. 
Applies economic analysis to planning and 
regulation of health programs. Application is 
emphasized over theory. Examines planning 
and regulation in a market economy and devel- 
ops analytical tools, including systematic anal- 
ysis, econometrics, modeling, simulation, and 
cost-benefit analysis. Health policy topics in- 
clude: national health insurance, health man- 
power, resource allocation, and hospital 
facilities. Skills in using analytical techniques 
appropriately are developed. Course especially 
appropriate for students who intend to pursue 
a career in planning and evaluation of health 
programs. 

Prereq. One semester each of statistics and 
microeconomics. 



EHS-HPM 210a. Introduction to Operations 
Management (formerly EHS-HPM 211a) 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Cooper, Dr. Shepard, Dr. Evans. 
(Course described under Environmental 
Health Sciences.) 

HPM 211c. Policy II: Quantitative Policy 
Analysis 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Thompson. 
Introduces students to techniques for analyz- 
ing health problems quantitatively. Tech- 
niques include decision analysis and benefit- 
cost analysis. Readings from health policy and 
management literature are used to illustrate the 
techniques and their limitations. 
Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program. 

HPM 215b. Health Program Evaluation (form- 
erly BIO-HPM 215b) 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Thompson. 
Designed to increase a student's ability to 
understand the uses and limitations of meth- 
ods employed to evaluate health programs. 
Concentrates on a review of various meth- 
odologies and focuses on their application. 
Topics covered include experimental and 
quasi-experimental designs, internal and ex- 
ternal validity, evaluation project manage- 
ment, information collection strategies, nor- 
mative analytic techniques, and ethical and 
legal issues. 

HPM-BIO 216c. Decision Analysis for Health 
and Medical Practices (Public Policy S-176m) 
Lectures, discussions. Two Wz-hour sessions 
each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Weinstein. 
Concerns the methods and applications of de- 
cision analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, 
and cost-benefit analysis in the evaluation of 
clinical procedures and health practices. Ap- 
plications and limitations of techniques will be 
stressed. Topics include: resource allocation in 
the management of hypertension, treatment 
decision for acute abdominal pain, diagnosis 
of reno-vascular disease, estrogen use in the 
menopause, and coronary artery bypass 



Health Policy and Management / 109 



surgery. Implications for quality assurance and 
medical reimbursement policies are consid- 
ered. 

Prereq. BIO 201a, b or equivalent introductory 
course in probability and statistics. 
Acceptable substitute for HPM 211c for stu- 
dents in the two-year Health Policy and Man- 
agement Program, but both may be taken con- 
currently for credit. 

HPM 217a. Decision Analysis and Evaluation 

Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Thompson. 
Provides an overview of important, recent de- 
velopments in decision analysis and benefit- 
cost analysis and of their applications to policy 
and evaluation problems in health. Empha- 
sizes the appropriate use of analytic techniques 
for decision making, recognition of their 
short-comings and limitations, and their role 
in program evaluation. Topics include: dis- 
counting, evaluation planning, measurement 
of health status, multi-attribute decision mak- 
ing, multi-person decision making, sample 
size determination, and willingness to pay. 
HPM 211c or HPM-BIO 216c helpful, but not 
necessary. 

HPM 218d. Seminar on Clinical Decision 
Analysis 

Seminar. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Fineberg, Dr. Weinstein. 
Intended to enhance the student's ability to 
conduct independent analyses of medical deci- 
sions. Didactic sessions will critically review 
published analyses and address selected top- 
ics, such as evaluation of diagnostic tests, util- 
ity assessment, and use of computer aids. Pre- 
sumes knowledge of principles of decision 
analysis. 

Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program: Medical 
Dental Track. 

Prereq. HPM 211c or HPM-BIO 216c, or per- 
mission of instructor. 

HPM-BIO 219b,c, 219d. Statistical Methods 
for Health Policy and Management 

Lectures. Three 2-hour sessions each week. "b,c": 
5 units; "d": 2.5 units. Dr. Lavin, Dr. Feldstein. 
"b,c": Introduces students to probability and 
statistics emphasizing their application in a 
variety of health policy and management con- 
texts. Goals include establishing an awareness 
of basic statistical reasoning and recognition of 



common difficulties in application. Topics in- 
clude: distributions, data display, sensitivity, 
specificity, life tables, representative sam- 
pling, confidence intervals, study design, 
standardization, p-values, power, sample size 
determinations, testing means and pro- 
portions, contingency tables, goodness of fit 
tests, rate adjustment, regression, correlation, 
and prediction. The MINITAB package will be 
used throughout. 

"d": Promotes facility with data analysis using 
regression and time series techniques of analy- 
sis with the MINITAB package. Topics include: 
multiple regression, discriminant analysis, 
forecasting, and analysis of categorical data. 
Both the "b,c" and "d" sections are required 
for students in the two-year Health Policy and 
Management Program. 
Sections may not be taken separately. 
May not be taken for credit by students who 
previously have taken BIO 201a, b. 
Prereq. One college-level course in mathemat- 
ics. Enrollment of students not in the two-year 
Health Policy and Management Program sub- 
ject to approval of the instructors. 

HPM 220a,b/220c,d. Administrative Systems 

Lectures, seminars. Three 2-hour sessions each 
week. 5 units each term. Dr. Barrett, Members 
of the Department. 

Examines issues related to managing health 
care organizations and develops skills in a 
variety of functional areas, including: organi- 
zational theory, institutional strategy, leader- 
ship, change and conflict, personnel and labor 
relations, financial accounting and analysis, 
cost accounting, operations management, 
marketing and management control systems. 
Classes rely principally on the case method of 
instruction. 

Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program. HPM 
220a, b may be taken separately by other stu- 
dents, but only HPM 220a, b, 220c, d is an ac- 
ceptable substitute for HPM 221a, b. HPM 
220c, d may not be taken separately. 
May be taken for credit by students who pre- 
viously have taken HPM 221a, b. 



HPM 221a, b. Administration of Health 

Services 

Case discussion and lectures. Two 2-hour ses- 
sions each week. 5 units. Dr. Young, Dr. Shel- 
don. 

An introduction to the major topics of general 
management of health organizations. Focuses 
on organizational behavior and design, 
marketing, finance, control, and strategy. The 
goal is to explore the analysis of managerial 
problems and to evaluate alternative solutions, 
applying relevant managerial concepts and 
theories. 

Either HPM 221a, b or HPM 220a,b/220c,d is 
required for students in the M.P.H. program. 
May not be taken for credit by students 
enrolled in the two-year Health Policy and 
Management Program or by students who pre- 
viously have taken HPM 220a-d. 

HPM 223a. Personnel 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Case discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Barrett, Dr. Hobart. 
Covers applications and implications of per- 
sonnel policies to health care institutions. Top- 
ics include: traditional functions of personnel, 
the implications of a human resource manage- 
ment approach for policy formulation (both on 
a national and institutional basis), the effect of 
innovation on workplace relationships, and 
the challenge of increased advisory 
capabilities. 

HPM 224b. Labor Relations 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Case discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Barrett, Dr. Hobart. 
Describes applications and implications of 
labor relations policies to health care institu- 
tions. Emphasizes the grievance, arbitration 
and negotiation processes, including a negoti- 
ation exercise. 

HPM 233c. The Management of Organiza- 
tional Design and Change 

May not be available 1982-83. 
Lectures, case presentations, discussions. Two 
2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Barrett, 
Dr. Sheldon. 

Examines various models of organizational 
diagnosis in order to understand the way in 
which complex health care organizations func- 
tion. Considers change within the framework 
of different climates, functions and strategies 



110 Courses of Instruction 



and assesses different models of change that 
might be used by managers, policy makers, 
and consultants. 

Prereq. HPM 220a-d or knowledge of basic is- 
sues of organizational behavior. Enrollment 
limited to 15 and subject to approval of the 
instructor. 

HPM 234a. Management Control Systems 

Case studies. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 
2.5 units. Dr. Young. 

Builds on the skills and techniques covered in 
the cost accounting and management control 
system modules of (HPM 220 a,b, 220c, d.) The 
material covered is more advanced than that in 
HPM 220 and should be of interest to students 
pursuing careers in management. Uses case 
method instruction primarily, supplemented 
by topical readings. Topics include: full and 
differential cost analysis, budgeting, and 
management control systems. The principal 
focus is on institutions, although some mate- 
rial has a public sector orientation. 
Prereq. HPM 220a-d or equivalent. 

HPM 235d. Seminar on Hospital Cost 
Containment 

Seminar. One 3-hour session each week. 1.25 
units. Dr. Herzlinger, Dr. Kane. 
Designed to be a state-of-the-art, holistic re- 
view and analysis of all factors involved in con- 
taining hospital costs: providers, inter- 
mediaries, regulators, planners, employers, 
unions, and consumers. First half of class ses- 
sion will be a discussion of relevant literature; 
second half will be a series of presentations 
interactions with outside representatives of 
specific cost containment efforts. 

HPM 236d. Planning in the Hospital Setting 

Lectures, seminars. Two 1 Vi-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Yerby, Ms. Bander. 
Designed to acquaint students with the con- 
cepts and strategies of planning in the hospital 
setting. Offers practical understanding of the 
current status and potential application of or- 
ganized planning efforts in the modern hospi- 
tal. Environmental issues explored as well as 
the status of and outlook for multi-institutional 
planning endeavors. Special emphasis placed 
upon the perspective and approach of the or- 
ganization. 

Enrollment subject to approval of the in- 
structors. 



HPM 237c. Financial Management in Health 

May not be available 1982-83. 
Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Young, Mr. Hourihan. 
Concerned with management of the flow of 
funds through a health organization. Makes 
use of data supplied by the accounting system 
to help organizations make rational resource 
allocation decisions. Focuses on several tech- 
niques required for effective short- and long- 
term financial management. Takes the perspec- 
tive of manager, although some attention will 
be given to understanding the financial 
environment, including capital markets. 
Prereq. HPM 220a-d or equivalent. 

HPM 238c. Introduction to Management 
Information Systems 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Young. 
Examines basic principles relating to the effect- 
ive use of computer-based information sys- 
tems in organizations. Although some 
technological issues are addressed on occasion, 
the principal focus of the course is on topics of 
analysis, design, implementation, and control, 
rather than technology. The course addresses 
MIS issues in non-profit organizations, with 
several classes devoted to health-related or- 
ganizations. 

Prereq. HPM 220 a-d, HPM 221 a,b, or equiva- 
lent. 

HPM 239a. Advanced Financial Accounting 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Kane. 
Provides the opportunity to develop advanced 
skills in financial accounting and analysis of 
financial reports. Covers fund accounting, ac- 
counting for inflation, analysis of financial 
statements and funds flow. Cases draw on both 
hospitals and other non-profit organizations. 
Prereq. HPM 220a, b or equivalent. 

HPM 240a. Toward an Agenda for U.S. Public 
Health 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Roberts, Guest Lecturers. 
Provides an overview of the problems of set- 
ting priorities in public health. Examines the 
contribution of environmental, economic, so- 
cial and behavioral factors to the contemporary 
burden of illness. Analyzes changing defini- 
tions of health and disease, and the roles of 
medicine and public health in dealing with 



illness. Explores the assumptions and implica- 
tions of various philosophical positions offered 
as a basis for resolving priority setting ques- 
tions. 

Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program. 

HPM 241b. Health Care Delivery in the U.S.: 
History and Sociology 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Fineberg, Members of the 
Department. 

Offers an introduction to contrasting sociologi- 
cal and historical accounts of the U.S. health 
care sector. Historical materials and contempo- 
rary case studies are used to analyze the roles of 
providers, patients and other political, cultural 
and social factors in determining the current 
objectives and institutional arrangements in 
this sector. The central role of physicians and 
"medical science" in health care is empha- 
sized, and its implications for institutional re- 
form explored. 

Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program: General and 
Medical Dental Tracks. 
Prereq. HPM 240a. 

HPM 242c, d. The Health Care Delivery Sys- 
tem: Political and Economic Analysis (form- 
erly HPM 240c,d) 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 5 units. Dr. Feldman, Dr. Hemenway. 
Examines major health care delivery issues, 
and the development and implementation of 
policies and programs designed to address 
them using several frameworks including that 
of economic and political analysis. Topics in- 
clude: health manpower, health care finance, 
health planning and regulation, new medical 
technology, and the supply of and demand for 
medical care facilities. 

Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program: General and 
Medical Dental Tracks. 

Prereq. HPM 100a, b, HPM 205a, b, or equiva- 
lent with permission of the instructor. 



Health Policy and Management / 111 



HPM 244c. Topics and Methods in Health 
Services Planning 

Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 units. Dr. J. 
Brown. 

This course has three purposes: 1) to teach and 
criticize important established and state-of- 
the-art methods; 2) to examine methods and 
planning effects in several key areas of plan- 
ning activity; and 3) to critically appraise the 
present and potential social role of area-wide 
planning in the U.S. Designed for all students 
concerned with long-range resource allocation 
and its broad social effects, not just students 
interested in planning as a profession. 

HPM 245c. Design and Implementation of 
Health Care Regulation 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Feldman. 

Analyzes the policy choices which are inherent 
in government programs intended to change 
the behavior of health care providers. Cases are 
drawn primarily from planning and regulatory 
programs at the federal and state levels in the 
United States. 

HPM 248a, b. Contemporary Issues in Health 
Policy 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Feldman. 
Examines from a variety of analytic perspec- 
tives three to four health policy issues of cur- 
rent political importance. Issues might in- 
clude, for example, long-term care for the el- 
derly, services for the mentally ill, the dissemi- 
nation and regulation of medical technology 
and/or the impact of "New Federalism" on 
health funding and health services. Analysis 
will focus on 1) alternative problem definitions 
and policy goals, 2) available evidence on pol- 
icy impacts, and 3) economic, political and 
other criteria for choosing among various pol- 
icy alternatives. 

Prereq. HPM 240a, 241b, 242c,d or the equiva- 
lent introduction to economic and political 
analysis of the health care system. 

HPM 250d. Policy III: Policy Implementation 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Thomas. 
Intended to help students think systematically 
about some of the reasons public programs 
succeed or fail. It assumes that the choice of 
appropriate and effective institutional ar- 



rangements for accomplishing policy goals is 
itself an important policy question. Examples 
are taken from a variety of policy areas. 
Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program. 
Presumes knowledge of material presented in 
HPM 100a,b (or HPM 205a,b) and HPM 211c. 

HPM-MCHA 252a,b. Public Health Law and 
Human Rights 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 3 units. 
Dr. Curran. 

Entails a comprehensive examination of 
human rights as they bear upon health pro- 
grams, nationally and internationally. Among 
topics considered from ethical, cultural, and 
legal viewpoints are rights to medical care and 
a healthy environment, equality, rights of 
medical patients, women, children, and exper- 
imental subjects, and problems of balancing 
personal rights and community protection. 
Enrollment limited. Auditing and convenience 
attendance not permitted. 

HPM 253e. Government and Private Funding 
for Research and Health Care Programs 

Lectures, discussions, workshops. To be ar- 
ranged. 1 unit. Members of the Department. 
To carry out research or develop needed health 
care programs, managers and policy analysts 
need to be able to obtain funding from federal, 
state, and local government sources, and from 
foundations and corporations. This course 
aims to enable participants to demonstrate in a 
clear and concise proposal an understanding of 
the issues and facility with methodological de- 
sign, and to explore potential sources of fund- 
ing. Requirements for proper administration 
of funds are also discussed. Proposals are pre- 
pared and critiqued in the workshops. 
Prereq. Exposure to research issues in health 
care or program development and permission 
of the instructor. 

HPM 254c,d. Health Law and Policy: Risk 
Management Programs, Quality Controls, and 
Compensation Policies 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Curran. 

Focuses upon the development, implementa- 
tion, and evaluation of risk management pro- 
grams and legislative reforms in patient com- 
pensation plans. Attention will be given to 
medical and hospital malpractice experience, 
key legal decisions in the area, and legislative 



reform movements setting up arbitration, 
screening panels, tort-law changes, no-fault 
mechanisms, etc. The inter-relationship of 
quality of care standards and quality assurance 
to malpractice vulnerability and risk manage- 
ment programs will be a primary focus of atten- 
tion. 

HPM-MCHA 252a, b and HPM 258c advised, 
but not required. 

HPM 255d. Reimbursement Systems 

Seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Kane. 

Examines issues related to the general theme of 
third-party reimbursement for health care in- 
stitutions. The principal focus is on hospitals. 
Issues include: cost containment efforts, hospi- 
tal perspectives, and the role of incentives. 
Some specific systems are examined in detail in 
order to assess the feasibility of certain tech- 
niques and to address questions of overall re- 
imbursement system design. 

HPM 256c, d. Health Insurance Industry: Its 
Structure and Effects on Health Care 

Seminar. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Mr. Hsiao. 

Examines the health insurance industry and 
how it affects patients, hospitals, physicians 
and dentists. Provides students with an under- 
standing of the industry's structure, the types 
of firms in this industry, their internal opera- 
tions, product design and reimbursement 
policies. Analyzes how the decisions of insur- 
ance firms affect access to health services, dif- 
fusion of medical technology, hospital costs, 
physician and dental fees, and competition in 
medical care. 

HPM 257b. Physician Performance: 
Facilitators and Constraints 

Seminars, case discussions. Two 2-hour sessions 
each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Palmer. 
Examines circumstances and programs which 
facilitate or constrain quality of physician per- 
formance. Issues discussed include public ex- 
pectations of physician performance, inherent 
task constraints, cost-tradeoffs, effect of prac- 
tice setting and specialization, selection, edu- 
cation, licensure, and specialty certification of 
physicians, malpractice and risk management, 
impaired physician programs, and utilization 



112 / Courses of Instruction 



review programs. Examples of actual cases will 
be discussed. 

Enrollment limited to 20 and subject to ap- 
proval of the instructor. Experience in medical 
care delivery- an advantage, but not required. 
Course is followed by the optional sequel HPM 
258c. 

HPM 258c. Evaluation of Quality of Health 
Care (formerly HPM 257a i 
Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Palmer, Visiting Lecturers. 
Examines issues in defining "quality in health 
care " and the choice of methods for assessing 
and improving quality of health care. Recent 
research is reviewed and operating programs, 
including the PSRO experience are analyzed. 
Presentation includes case materials from qual- 
ity of care evaluation programs in both hospital 
and ambulatory settings. 

HPM-POP 262c, d. Health Planning in 
Developing Countries 

Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 

Laboratory. One 1-hour session each week (op- 
tional). 5 units. Dr. Cash, Dr. Shepard. 
Deals with skills needed for health planning 
through lectures, problems, and case studies. 
Strong emphasis is placed on the economic 
analysis of health issues in developing coun- 
tries. Selected concepts and techniques of 
political analysis, microeconomics, cost ef- 
fectiveness and cost benefit analysis, and pro- 
jection of recurrent costs are presented and 
applied to health care programs. These tech- 
niques are then incorporated into a planning 
context in analyzing and developing recom- 
mendations around selected health plans. Em- 
phasizes practical and applied work. 
ID 209a, b or experience in developing coun- 
tries is recommended, but not required. A 
background in economics is not required. 

POP-HPM 263c. Case Studies in Design and 
Management of Population and Community 
Health Programs 

Case discussions, seminars. Two 2-hour ses- 
sions each week. 2.5 units. Members of the De- 
partment. 

(Course described under Population Sciences.) 



POP-HPM 264d. Case Studies in Comparative 
Design and Management of Population and 
Health Programs 

Case discussions, seminars. Two 2-hour ses- 
sions each week. 2.5 units. Members of the De- 
partment. 

( Course described under Population Sciences. ) 

HPM 264c, d. Health and Social Welfare 
Systems in Cross-National Perspective 

Lectures, seminars, case discussions. Two 
2-hour sessions each week. 5 units. Dr. Yerby, Dr. 
Dieter Koch-Weser (Associate Professor of 
Preventive and Social Medicine, Harvard Med- 
ical School), Dr. Field. 

Modernization and industrialization have af- 
fected the health and economic security of in- 
dividuals and families. Cyclic unemployment, 
industrial accidents and disease, temporary 
and permanent disability, and the social and 
financial deficits of old age are among the prob- 
lems of modem nation states. The course exam- 
ines the mechanisms that have evolved in dif- 
ferent societies to ameliorate these hazards. 
The interrelatedness of health and social wel- 
fare programs and services is explored. 

HPM-EHS 267a,b. Political Economy of 
Environmental Health Regulation 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Lectures, discussions. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 5 units. Dr. Roberts, Dr. Repetto, 
Dr. Thomas, Dr. Landy. 

Examines the circumstances under which gov- 
ernmental intervention is appropriate to pro- 
tect human health and the environment. Fo- 
cuses on the likely consequences of choosing 
one or another regulatory strategy to reach spe- 
cific environmental health objectives. 
Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program 
Environmental Track. 

HPM-EHS 269c, d. Environmental Health 
Policy Analysis 

Lectures, case discussions. Two 2-hour sessions 
each week. 5 units. Dr. Cooper, Dr. Thomas, 
Dr. Roberts. 

Using the case method, demonstrates the ap- 
plication of analytic and technical skills to ac- 
tual policy situations. The multidisciplinary 
approach will emphasize the technical uncer- 
tainties and the evaluative and institutional 
complexities surrounding environmental pol- 
icy issues. Policy questions will be considered 



in an organizational context permitting stu- 
dents to consider the uses and limitations of 
formal methods of analysis. 
Prereq. Previous coursework in policy, man- 
agement, or environmental health sciences. 
Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program 
Environmental Track. 

HPM 275a,b. Dental Public Health Practice 

Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Yacovone. 

Provides in-depth training in the administra- 
tion and planning of dental health programs. 
Subjects include: community needs, resources, 
surveying, fluoridation, prepayment, and pro- 
gram evaluation. Each student develops a pro- 
gram plan in a specific area of community den- 
tal needs and presents the plan to the class. 

HPM 276c, d. Dentistry and Social Policy 

Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Yacovone. 
Investigates relationships between the social 
sciences and dentistry. Subjects include: the 
role of the social sciences in dentistry, psycho- 
social interaction of doctor and patient, client 
perceptions of dentistry, interpersonal rela- 
tionships in group practice, and the sociopolit- 
ical influence of dentistry as an organization. 

HPM 290a,b,c,d. Applied Research Seminar 

Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 
Field work. One day each week. 10 units. Dr. J. 
Brown, Dr. Thomas, Dr. Sheldon. 
Students will work on a specific problem in an 
operational setting under the guidance of both 
clinical preceptors and academic faculty mem- 
bers. In the seminar, students, faculty, and 
preceptors discuss each student's project and 
the related methodological, conceptual, and 
organizational issues. Students prepare a con- 
text paper in the first semester and a project 
report in the second semester. The project re- 
port is designed to assist the organization in 
determining policy options, or in solving ad- 
ministrative problems. 

Required for students in the two-year Health 
Policy and Management Program. 
Prereq. Completion of the first year of the 
Health Policy and Management Program. 



Health Policy and Management 113 



HPM 295a, b. Doctoral Seminar on Research 
Methods 

Seminar. One 3-hour session each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Roberts, Members of the Department. 
Sensitizes students to variations in scientific 
methods and approaches among the various 
disciplines that relate to public health and 
enables them to design projects and choose 
methods appropriate to the questions they 
wish to pursue. It is not intended to explore 
statistical issues from a technical perspective, 
but rather to offer a philosophical and sociolog- 
ical analysis that places various clinical, exper- 
imental and observational approaches to em- 
pirical research into a single, coherent analyt- 
ical context. 

Prereq. Enrollment in the Health Policy and 
Management doctoral program andor similar 
background and experience. 

HPM 296c, d. Economic and Political Theory in 
Health 

Seminar. One 3-hour session each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Thomas, Members of the Department. 
Examines the uses of economic and political 
theory in explaining and assessing the opera- 
tion of health care institutions and the quality 
of health policy. Contrasts the governing as- 
sumptions and reviews contemporary dis- 
cussions of contractarian, utilitarian, m- 
sfitutionalist and Marxist perspectives. Topics 
include: role of markets and political processes; 
the model of rational behavior; equity, ration- 
ality and efficiency in social choice; strategies 
for reform and social change. 
Prereq. Enrollment in the Health Policy and 
Management doctoral program andor course 
work in microeconomics. 

HPM 300a,b,c,d,e. Tutorials 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Students may make individual arrangements 
to do work under the guidance of a member of 
the department. This work may include 
readings or special projects. 



HPM 330. Field Work 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Students are assigned to work on special proj- 
ects such as group surveys, other types of field 
projects, or observation of and limited partici- 
pation in the work of health agencies. Field 
assignments are made on an individual basis to 
meet the needs of each student insofar as pos- 
sible. Work in the field is coordinated with 
courses in the Department, and is offered 
through the Community Health Improvement 
Program. 

HPM 350. Research 

Doctoral candidates may register for HPM 350 
to undertake individual study and research. 

Attention is directed to courses described under 
Interdepartmental Courses. 



Maternal and Child Health 
and Aging 

MCHA 101a. Growth and 
Development I 

Lectures, self-instructional material. Two 

2-hour seminars/lectures weekly. 2.5 units. Dr. 
Valadian, Dr. DeLollis. 

Instruction in physical growth, development, 
maturation and aging is presented in pro- 
grammed, self-instructional material, and by 
weekly lectures. Covers topics necessary for 
the advanced study of growth and develop- 
ment, but also provides an understanding of 
assets and needs which constitute a basis for 
health services. Designed for MCHA students 
who do not have a strong background in physi- 
cal development, but may also be taken by 
health providers who wish to refresh their 
knowledge. 

MCHA 200b. Growth and Development II: 
Advanced Seminar 

Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 3.25 
units. Dr. Valadian, Dr. DeLollis. 
Describes and integrates the characteristics of 
human growth and physical development 
which occur during the selected life stages from 
conception to maturation. Intended for stu- 
dents with special interest in human develop- 
ment. Considers implication of child growth 
and development of these periods for health 
services and further research. 
Prereq. MCHA 101a or permission of the in- 
structor. 

MCHA 201c. Growth and Development III: 
Factors Affecting Growth and 
Development 

Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each 
week. 1.25 units. Dr. Valadian, Dr. DeLollis. 
Explores definable influences that act on the 
course of physical growth and development 
from conception to maturity. Emphasis is 
placed on understanding the nature of the fac- 
tor and its direct effects, as well as on how 
factors interrelate to produce some charac- 
teristics of mature individuals. This course also 
considers implications of factors for planning 
and providing health services and for future 
research. 

Prereq. MCHA 101a or permission of the in- 
structor. 



114 Courses of Instruction 



MCHA 202e. Primary Maternal and Child 
Health Caie 

Seminars, lectures, field visits. Full-day ses- 
sions. 1.25 units. Dr. Gardner. 
Introduces the student to principles of organi- 
zation and administration of primary health 
care services for mothers and children. Con- 
cepts of primary care, neighborhood health 
centers and quality assurance are presented. 
Seminars focus on the issues and problems 
presented in the held visits. The community 
programs selected are diverse, including 
neighborhood health centers, private practice, 
hospital primary care. HMO and or university 
health care. 

MCHA 203a,b. Content of Maternal and Child 
Health Services 

Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Or. Gardner. 

Components of health care services for mothers 
and children are discussed as they vary to meet 
the changing needs resulting from growth and 
matu rational processes. Health services ap- 
propriate to maternity, early and late child- 
hood, adolescence, and youth are presented in 
terms of the multidisciplinary and interdisci- 
plinary action they require. 

MCHA 20-k,d. Programs and Issues in 
Maternal and Child Health Services 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Valadian, Members of the Department, 
Guest Lecturers. 

Beginning with the historical background and 
the relationship of maternal and child health 
programs to social, mental health, education, 
and other systems, the course discusses factors 
which shape current and future maternal and 
child health policies and services. It considers 
the organization and administration of na- 
tional, state, and local health services for moth- 
ers, infants, children and adolescents and serv- 
ices for children with handicapping condi- 
tions. Selected issues are examined such as de- 
velopmental disorders. Sudden Infant Death 
Syndrome, day care, school health. Emphasis 
is placed on financing, planning and evaluat- 
ing MCH Services. 



MCHA 205d. Research Approach to Growth, 
Development, and Health of the Child 

Seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2 
units. Dr. Valadian, Dr. Reed. 
Methods of obtaining and evaluating data on 
child growth, development, and health, and 
the construction of norms are studied, includ- 
ing the design of studies dealing with interrela- 
tionships among various aspects of the child's 
progress, background, and environment. 
Enrollment subject to approval of the in- 
structors. 

MCHA 206c,d. Maternal and Child Health in 
Developing Countries 

Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Valadian. 

Parallels MCHA 204c,d: emphasizes factors 
which shape MCH programs in rapidly chang- 
ing social and cultural environments, particu- 
larly the interactions between health, nutrition 
and poverty. Studies selected programs by age 
periods from various areas of the world and the 
processes of planning, financing, implement- 
ing, and evaluating such programs in relation 
to other sectors. Individual or small group 
projects are required. 

MCHA- NTT 207c,d. Nutrition in Child 
Growth and Development 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Dwyer. 
Principles and practical problems encountered 
in the nutritional aspects of child growth and 
development are examined. Lectures on gen- 
eral principles are designed to help students 
base their judgments on scientific evidence. 
Discussions deal with a variety of nutrition 
case studies and simulations illustrative of 
problems in both developing and highly in- 
dustrialized countries. 

MCHA 20Sd. Rural Health Services 

Seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Hayes. 

Lectures and discussions focus on the special 
problems of rural communities impacting on 
MCH services delivery, cultural charac- 
teristics, resources available and innovative 
approaches to problems, with selected exam- 
ples in rural areas. Emphasis placed on doing 
needs demands assessments or community 
diagnosis which structure planning for the 
health needs in isolated communities. Topics 
include transportation problems, environmen- 
tal health hazards, and rural health concerns in 
developing countries. 



MCHA 210a. An Introduction to Personality 
and Cognitive Development 

Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Walker. 
The basic principles of child growth and devel- 
opment in the cognitive and the psychosocial 
domains are examined in this introductory 
course. Special emphasis placed on under- 
standing the theories and research of Piaget, 
Freud, Erikson, and others, as well as the im- 
plications of these contributions to the plan- 
ning and implementation of medical and or re- 
lated social and educational services for chil- 
dren and youth. 

MCHA 211b. Health Care of Women 

Seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Gardner. 

Considers critical issues of health care and the 
common problems of women, including the 
changing role of women in contemporary Uni- 
ted States society. These health problems are 
addressed in terms of their epidemiology and 
the impact of technology on their detection 
and treatment viewed from biological, medi- 
cal, behavioral, and legal perspectives. 
Enrollment limited to 20 students. 

MCHA 212d. Childhood Mental Disorders: 
Public Health Perspectives 

Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session per 
week. 1.25 units. Dr. Deykin. 
Examines the occurrence and known risk fac- 
tors of selected mental disorders of childhood 
and adolescence including autism, depression, 
hyperactivity, and anorexia. Emphasis is on 
the methodologic issues of case definition, 
disorder classification, current diagnostic and 
screening instruments, and on the 
advantages disadvantages of available data 
sources. Readings will include studies selected 
to illustrate methodologic options and useful- 
ness for public health policy. 

MCHA 214a, b. The Elderly Person in the 
Health Care System (HMS Geriatrics 702) 
One 3-hour session each week. 2.5 units. Dr. 
Laurence Branch (Assistant Professor of Pre- 
ventive and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical 
School). 

Uses a variety of public health perspectives to 
analyze the health needs of the elderly and 
services to meet them. Topics include: demo- 
graphic background of the "graying" of Amer- 



Maternal and Child Health and Aging 115 



ica, normal and pathological aging processes, 
epidemiology of geriatric illness, design and 
administration of present alternative forms of 
long-term care, and cross-national perspec- 
tives. 

MCMA 220c. Social Services for Infants and 
Children 

Lectures, seminars. Tivo 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Deykin. 
Introduces students to the crucial role of social 
services in maintaining and promoting health 
in populations with specific reference to moth- 
ers and children. Beginning with an historical 
overview of social services in the U.S., the 
course examines the major welfare programs 
(AI DC, SSI, Title XX, nutritional programs), 
their administration, funding mechanisms, 
goals and strategies. The political forces and 
the changing social needs which modify the 
content of social services are discussed. Ana- 
lyzes the social and psychological determi- 
nants of the need for as well as the utilization of 
services; focuses on hospitalized, impaired, 
and terminally ill children as well as on chil- 
dren in need of foster care and adoption. 

MCMA 221d. Social Services for Adolescents 
and Women 

Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Deykin. 
A continuation of 220c, this course discusses 
the range of social services designed to meet 
the needs of older children, adolescents and 
mothers. Services for abused children, for al- 
coholic and addicted youth, for pregnant teen- 
agers, and for victims of family violence will be 
presented in the light of changing funding and 
governmental responsibility. 
Prereq. MCHA 220c or approval of the in- 
structor. 

MCHA-BEH 237c,d. Child Development and 
Social Policy (Education P-220) 
Seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Walker. 

Analyzes how knowledge of child develop- 
ment relates to the planning and implementa- 
tion of social policy. Of primary concern are the 
relevance and utility of basic data from re- 
search and evaluation studies in psychology, 
pediatrics, and related disciplines in the crea- 
tion of health and education programs and 
policies concerned with children and adoles- 
cents. 

Prereq. Knowledge of basic child development 
and of research methodologies and statistics. 



HPM-MCHA 252a,b. Public Health Law and 
Human Rights 

Lectures. One 2-lwur session each week. 3 units. 
Dr. Curran. 

(Course described under Health Policy and 
Management.) 

MCHA 300. Tutorials 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Students at the master's level may arrange to 
work individually or in small groups under the 
guidance of a faculty member. The work may 
include participation in departmental re- 
search, specialized readings, field projects in a 
local or state health agency, or small studies to 
examine more in-depth topics introduced in 
various courses such as: planning and evalua- 
tion of MCH services for children with handi- 
capping conditions. 

Tutorials will be offered depending on stu- 
dents' interests and will be limited by the 
amount of faculty time that is available. Ar- 
rangements must be made with individual fac- 
ulty members. 

MCHA 330. Field Study 

One-week period behveen fall and spring terms. 1 
unit. 

Field study will be arranged on an individual 
basis to meet the special needs of each student 
insofar as possible. A group field study to 
Mississippi is offered prior to the course 
MCHA 208. Limited travel fellowships are 
available. 

Additional Field Study 

Students who lack sufficient previous experi- 
ence are encouraged to undertake a period of 
field study before registration or after comple- 
tion of the academic year, in a program ar- 
ranged by the staff of the Department. No 
credit is allowed for such field study. 

MCHA 350. Research 

Doctoral students may undertake research in 
maternal and child health or aging by arrange- 
ment with the Chairman of the Department. 



Microbiology 

MIC 202b. Critiques of Current Literature on 
Infectious Diseases 

Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 2 unit. 
Members of the Department. 
Papers on topics of general interest are selected 
from current periodicals and critically re- 
viewed as to soundness of experimental de- 
sign, validity and significance of results and 
conclusions, organization of manuscript, and 
clarity of presentation. The course will not be 
given if less than 8 students enroll. 

MIC 203d. Clinical Problems in Infectious 
Diseases 

Lectures, clinics. One 2-hour session each week. 
1 unit. Dr. Louis Weinstein (Visiting Professor 
of Medicine, Harvard Medical School). 
Problem cases concerning diagnosis, treat- 
ment, and control of the common acute com- 
municable diseases of temperate climates are 
presented, together with discussions of infec- 
tious diseases that are usually not considered 
communicable. 

MIC 204c. Immunologic Aspects of Infectious 
Disease 

Not offered 1982-83; offered alternate years. 
Lectures and discussions. One 2-hour and one 
1-hour session each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Eardley. 
Contemporary topics in immunoregulation 
will be considered in the context of a selected 
number of bacterial and viral infections. Par- 
ticular emphasis will be given to the cellular 
basis of the immune response focusing on 
mechanisms of host recognition and reaction. 
Students must have basic courses in mi- 
crobiology and immunology and approval of 
the instructor. 

MIC 205a,b/205c,d. Departmental Seminar 

Seminars. One 1-hour session each week. 1.25 
units each term. Dr. Grant, Dr. Eardley, Mem- 
bers of the Department. 

Students and Faculty will present research 
seminars and current literature reviews. Top- 
ics will include epidemiology, molecular 
biology, immunology, and virology as they 
relate to infectious disease or oncogenesis. 



116 / Courses of Instruction 



MIC 212a, b. Introduction to Cancer Biology 

Not offered 1982-83; offered alternate years. 
Lectures and discussions. Two 1 Vi-hour ses- 
sions each week. 5 units. Drs. Kennedy, 
Eisenstadt, Caims, Guest Lecturers. 
Emphasizes current experimental approaches 
to studying cancer biology- and the process of 
carcinogenesis. Topics include: the biology of 
cell modification and differentiation, the 
phenotype of the cancer cell, the properties of 
human and animal cancers, the process of cell 
transformation, mutagenesis, carcinogen 
metabolism and the general features of cancer 
epidemiology and what these say about the 
causes of human cancer. Early in the course 
several introductory lectures will be given to 
cover basic concepts of genetics, cell biology, 
and molecular biology. 

A background in some branch of science is 
desirable. 

MIC 217b. Virology 

Lectures, seminars. Jltree 1-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Essex, Dr. Falk, Dr. Mullins. 
Provides students with fundamentals of 
human virology and introduces the new and 
relevant concepts emanating from recent and 
ongoing research. Topics include: virus-host 
cell interaction, pathogenesis, chronic and la- 
tent infections, epidemiology, environmental 
factors, host defense mechanisms, and com- 
munity control measures. Selected virus 
groups discussed in detail. Suggest students 
discuss enrollment with instructor before reg- 
istering. 



MIC 219c, d. Advanced Cancer Cell Biology 

(Biophysics 203) 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Haseltine, Dr. Chen (Associate Professor of 
Pathology, Harvard Medical School). 
This is an advanced level course for those plan- 
ning to do research in the areas of car- 
cinogenesis, tumor cell biology and cancer 
pharmacology. Examines the nature of cancer 
at the molecular level. Explores the differences 
between normal cells and tumor cells in ani- 
mals and in tissue culture. Draws upon cell 
biology, viral oncology, tumor immunology, 
and genetics. Specific topics include: viral and 
chemical carcinogenesis, genetics of cancer 
and the transformed state, the nature of virus 
coded transformation functions, exogenous 
control of cell growth , the cell surface of normal 
and transformed cells, cell structure and motil- 
ity, the differences between benign and ma- 
lignant rumors, the problem of metastasis, and 
mutation and differentiation as models for 
cancer. 

Suggested prereq. Cell Biology 202, The Biol- 
ogy of the Cancer Cell, Biochemistry 165, On- 
cogenic Viruses. 

MIC 300a,b,c,d. Tutorial Programs 

Time and credit to be arranged. Members of the 
Department. 

Enrollment requires the consent of the staff 
member responsible for supervision of the re- 
search. The various subject areas are listed 
below by category. 

302 Viruses 

Dr. Essex, Dr. Falk, Dr. Haseltine. 
Isolation and identification of representa- 
tive viruses by use of cell culture, animal 
inoculation, and serologic techniques. 

303 Immunochemical Methods 
Members of the Department. 
Experiments with immunofluorescence, 
chromatography, Immunoelectrophore- 
sis, enzvme-coupled antibody, labeled 
isotopes, and other techniques applied to 
research on microorganisms and mecha- 
nisms of hypersensitivity. 



304 Public Health Laboratory 

Associates at the State Laboratory Insti- 
tute. 

The State Laboratory Institute is engaged 
in a variety of programs related to public 
health. These include the development, 
preparation, and testing of new and 
standard serums, vaccines, and blood 
fractions, research in various aspects of 
applied immunology; various aspects of 
diagnostic service in the fields of bacter- 
iology, virology, and congenital meta- 
bolic disorders; and field studies on ar- 
boviruses. Individual arrangements for 
study can be made in any of these pro- 
grams. 

305 Tumor Biology 

Dr. Essex, Dr. Cairns, Dr. Eardley, 
Dr. Eisenstadt, Dr. Falk, Dr. Grant, 
Dr. Haseltine, Dr. Mullins. 
Approaches and techniques for the study 
of cancer as an infectious disease. Proce- 
dures used to study tumor cell and tumor 
virus marker antigens and antibodies 
demonstrated. The significance of these 
markers for epidemiological, etiological, 
and diagnostic investigations of various 
tumor systems of known and unknown 
cause discussed. The relationship be- 
tween the immune response and the on- 
cogenic process examined. 

306 Cellular Immunology 
Dr. Eardley, Dr. Grant. 

Examines the events following immuni- 
zation or infection where the quality and 
quantity of the immune response is regu- 
lated by subsets or lymphocytes and their 
products. The mechanism of this regula- 
tion is explored by analyzing im- 
munologic circuits, idiotypic recogni- 
tion, and antibody and cell mediated 
cytotoxicity. 

MIC 350. Research 

Qualified doctoral candidates, research fel- 
lows, and full-time special students may regis- 
ter for MIC 350 to undertake original research 
in virology, bacteriology, immunology, or in 
one of the disciplines available at the State 
Laboratory Institute. A number of the current 
research activities of the Department are indi- 
cated under MIC 300. Inquiries about specific 
research opportunities should be addressed to 
the Chairman of the Department. 



Microbiology 117 



Nutrition 

NUT 201a,b. Principles of Nutrition 

Lectures. Tioo 2- hour sessions each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Thenen. 

An in-depth study of nutrients in relation to 
human health. The essential nutrients, their 
requirements and their functions in the or- 
ganism will be covered, as well as the impor- 
tant health issues related to nutritional de- 
ficiencies and excesses in industrialized coun- 
tries. Provides the foundation for other courses 
in nutrition. 

NUT 203c. Nutrition Policy and 
Management — United States 

Tu>o 1 Vz-hour sessions each week. 2.5 units. Dr. 
Austin, Members of the Department. 
Deals with the formation of food and nutrition 
policies and the operation of nutrition inter- 
vention programs aimed at the major nu- 
tritional problems in the United States. Case 
study approach applied to evaluate the major 
U.S. nutrition programs and policy issues 
(school lunch feeding, WIC program, nutrition 
and aging and development of a national nutri- 
tion policy). Local, state, and national perspec- 
tives will be explored. 

Prereq. NUT 201a, b or permission of the in- 
structor. 

NUT 203d. Nutrition Policy and 
Management — Developing Countries 

Two lVi-hour sessions each week. 2.5 units. Dr. 
Austin, Members of the Department. 
Deals with the problem of malnutrition in de- 
veloping countries. Using case study ap- 
proach, the course will examine the design, 
planning and implementation of food and nu- 
trition policies as well as the design and man- 
agement of specific nutrition programs. The 
nutrition programs which will be examined 
include fortification, nutrition education, sup- 
plementary feeding, consumer subsidies, and 
agriculture. 

Prereq. NUT 201a,b or NUT 210a,b or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

NUT 204a,b 204c,d. Departmental Seminars 

Seminars. Two 1-hour sessions each week. 2.5 
units each term. Dr. Owen, Members of the 
Department. 

Students participate in and present seminars 
reviewing current research and publications 
related to nutrition in addition to attending 



advanced seminars presented by faculty and 
guest speakers. Beginning students learn skills 
required for oral presentations. Topics include 
both basic research and applied areas of nutri- 
tion. 

NUT 205c, d. Biochemistry and Physiology of 
Nutrition 

Lectures. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Hayes, Members of the Department. 
The biochemistry and physiology of carbohy- 
drates, fat, protein, vitamins, and minerals are 
integrated from the nutritional perspective. 
Course provides an in-depth analysis for stu- 
dents with a major interest in nutritional bio- 
chemistry. 

Prereq. Course in biochemistry and permis- 
sion of the instructors. 

MCHA-NUT 207c,d. Nutrition in Child 
Growth and Development 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Dwyer. 
(Course described under Maternal and Child 
Health and Aging.) 

NUT 208c,d. Nutritional Aspects of Human 
Disease 

Lectures, case presentations, discussions. One 
2-hour session each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Herre- 
ra-Acena, Dr. el Lozy, Mrs. Witschi, Members 
of the Nutrition and Dietetics Department, 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. 
Reviews the role of diet in the causation and 
management of clinical obesity, diabetes mel- 
litus, coronary artery disease, anemia, liver 
disease, alcoholism, gastrointestinal disor- 
ders, and renal disease. Early detection and 
prevention of these nutrition-related disorders 
considered. 

NUT 209a, b. Food Science and Nutrition 

Lectures, discussions. Two 1-hour sessions each 
week. 2.5 units. Mrs. Witschi, Dr. Samonds, 
Members of the Department. 
Deals with nutrition in terms of the foods 
which supply mankind's nutrient needs, their 
composition and physical properties, and the 
positive and negative effects on nutrient qual- 
ities of food of genetic manipulation, agricul- 
tural practice, processing, storage, and cook- 
ing. The historical development of food tech- 
nology, including methods of preservation and 
sanitation, is related to current methods em- 
ployed in both developing and industrialized 
countries. 



NUT 210a, b. Nutrition Problems of Less 
Developed Countries 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 2.5 units. Dr. Herrera-Acena, Dr. Mora. 
The nutrition problems of less developed coun- 
tries are discussed in the context of basic 
human needs. The ecology and the biological 
and behavioral consequences of malnutrition 
are reviewed in detail. Special emphasis on 
issues in human biology relevant to the formu- 
lation of nutrition policy and programs. 

NUT 214a,b/214c,d. Research Techniques in 
Nutritional Biochemistry 

Lectures. One 1-hour session each week. 
Laboratory. Fifteen hours minimum each week. 5 
units each term. Dr. Geyer, Members of the Pro- 
gram in Nutritional Biochemistry. 
Students have the opportunity to rotate 
through the laboratories (one each period) of 
faculty members in the Nutritional Biochemis- 
try Program in order to learn current tech- 
niques applied to nutritional, cellular, and 
biochemical research. Weekly lectures will 
emphasize the theory behind the instrumenta- 
tion utilized in the laboratory. Oral and written 
presentations of research accomplished by the 
student to the Nutrition Faculty as required. 
Generally limited to students in the Nutritional 
Biochemistry Program; others may enroll if 
laboratory space is available or may take the 
lecture portion only for reduced credit (1.25 
each term). 

NUT-EPI 216a,b. Nutritional Epidemiology 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. el Lozy, Dr. Willett, Mrs. Witschi. 
Reviews methods for assessing dietary intakes 
of populations and individuals. Students will 
gain experience in the actual collection, analy- 
sis (including conversion to nutrients by com- 
puter) and interpretation of dietary intakes. 
Case studies follow, involving specific diet 
disease relationships integrating information 
from international studies, secular trends, clin- 
ical trials, analytical epidemiology, and animal 
experiments. 

Prereq. BIO 201a, b, EPI 201a or 221a,b, and 
permission of the instructor for students who 
have not taken a course in nutrition. 

NUT 300a,b,c,d,e. Tutorial Programs 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Individual work under direction may be ar- 
ranged. This can include laboratory studies, 
projects in applied nutrition, or library re- 
search. 



118 / Courses of Instruction 



NUT 351-368. Research 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Facilities are available for doctoral students to 
do advanced work in nutrition along the lines 
of fundamental or applied research as related to 
public health and medicine. Areas currently 
receiving intensive and comprehensive study 
in the Department are as follows: 
351 Dr. Geyer 

Effects of growth factors and hormones 
on the metabolism of human cells in cul- 
ture; nutrition and metabolism of iso- 
lated organs; complete blood replace- 
ment in vivo with artificial preparations. 
353 Dr. Lown 

Coronary artery disease; etiology of sud- 
den death; derangements of the heart 
beat; exercise physiology; electrolyte 
metabolism. 

356 Dr. Antoniades 

Regulation of cell growth by hormonal 
growth factors derived from human 
serum or platelets; platelet-derived 
growth factor and atherogenesis; mecha- 
nisms of hormone transport and regula- 
tion. 

357 Dr. Hayes 

Nutritional pathology with specific 
interest in diet and disorders of lipid and 
lipoprotein metabolism, particularly 
atherogenesis in non-human primates. 

358 Dr. Herrera-Acena 

The role of nutrition and other environ- 
mental factors in the etiology and 
management of diabetes mellitus; the re- 
lationship of malnutrition to physical and 
cognitive development. 

359 Dr. el Lozy 

The quantitation of malnutrition in chil- 
dren in developing countries on the basis 
of anthropometric measurements; 
studies of mathematical models of 
growth; application of these models to 
the study of growth in chronic diseases of 
childhood (diabetes, cystic fibrosis, etc.). 

360 Dr. Mora 

The epidemiology of malnutrition, phys- 
ical growth deficit, and cognitive retarda- 
tions. 



361 Dr. Thenen 

Early development and the role of nutri- 
tion in obesity and insulin resistance in 
experimental animal models; effects of 
marginal folic acid deficiency on repro- 
duction, hemopoiesis and resistance to 
infection; biochemical defects in vitamin 
B12 deficiency. 

362 Dr. Verrier 

Influence of neural factors, psychologic 
conditioning, and myocardial ischemia 
on susceptibility to ventricular arrhyth- 
mias and sudden death. 

363 Mrs. Witschi 

Computer-based interactive dietary his- 
tory, analysis, and counseling programs. 

364 Dr. Austin 

Cost effectiveness of infant and child 
supplemental feeding in the United 
States. Cost-benefit methodology for as- 
sessing safe levels of food additives. 

366 Dr. Franceschi 

Control of intestinal calcium absorption 
by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin Do, a steroid 
hormone. Regulation of gene expression 
by steroid hormone receptors. Mecha- 
nism of intestinal calcium transport. 

367 Dr. Lieberman 

The involvement of the cell surface in the 
following processes are being examined 
in cultured mammalian cells: regulation 
of cell growth, regulation of amino acid 
transport; phosphorylation as a growth 
regulating mechanism; and cellular dif- 
ferentiation. 

368 Dr. Owen 

Hormonal regulation of nutrient uptake 
and membrane function in human cells. 
Mechanism of action of growth factors. 
Regulation of amino acid transport and 
protein synthesis. 

Admission limited and subject to ap- 
proval of the instructor. 



Physiology 

Pm 203a, b. Human Physiology 

Lectures, conferences, demonstrations. Two 
1-hour and one 2-hour sessions each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Banzett, Members of the Department. 
Students lacking a background in biology are 
offered an intensive introduction to biological 
principles and to the physiology of cells, organ 
systems, and organisms. Some pathophysiol- 
ogy and a number of laboratory exercises are 
included. 

Prereq. College courses in physics, chemistry, 
and mathematics, or permission of the in- 
structor. 

PHY 205a, b. Principles of Toxicology 

Lectures, seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each 
week. 5 units. Dr. Tashjian, Members of the 
Laboratory of Toxicology. 
Emphasis placed on mechanisms of injurv re- 
sulting from exposure to environmental chem- 
icals at the molecular, cellular, organ and or- 
ganismal levels. Methods used to detect, eval- 
uate, analyze, and alleviate the toxic effects of 
chemicals are discussed. 

Prereq. Organic chemistry, biological chemis- 
try, and mammalian physiology. 

PHY 206a, b. Pulmonary Cell Biology 

To be given 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 
Laboratory review sessions. To be arranged. 5 
units. Dr. Sorokin, Dr. Brain, Members of the 
Department, Guest Lecturers. 
Surveys pulmonary structure and function, 
trachea to alveolus, from the viewpoint of cell 
biology. Examines biological properties of the 
more than 40 cell types present and considers 
how cell and tissue functions are integrated to 
provide for respiration, defense against air- 
borne infection, and other metabolic func- 
tions. Knowledge gained in this course helps 
prepare the student for research on the lungs 
and helps give insight into pulmonary disease. 
Prereq. College-level course in histology or cell 
biology; otherwise permission of the in- 
structor. Those without skill in interpreting 
morphological data will be at a disadvantage. 



Physiology 119 



I'HY 207c,d. Radiation Biology 

Lectures. Three I -hour sessions each week. 5 
Utlit8, Dr. Little. 

This course is divided into two parts: cellular 
and mammalian radiobiology. The first in- 
cludes radiation chemistry; cell survival, trans- 
formation, and mutagenesis; cytogenic effects; 
UV-photobiology; and cellular and molecular 
repair processes. The second covers effects of 
radiation in man and characteristics of internal 
and external human exposure. The biologic 
basis of the acute radiation syndrome, and the 
human epidemiologic data for radiation car- 
cinogenesis, are emphasized. 
Prereq. PHY 203a, b or college-level course in 
biology. 

I'HY 208a,b/209c,d. Seminar in Toxicology 

Seminars. One 1 -hour session each week. I unit 
each term. Dr. Tashjian, Members of the 
Laboratory. 

Seminars, journal clubs, and discussions of 
topics in basic research and the current litera- 
ture in toxicology. 

Prereq. Background in toxicology or related 
fields and permission of the instructor. 

PHY 210a,b/211c,d. Advanced Toxicology 

Not given 1982-83. 

Lectures, discussions, seminars. One 2-hour 
session each week. 

Laboratory. To be arranged. 5 units. Dr. Tash- 
jian, Members of the Laboratory. 
Examines experimental methods of research in 
toxicology. Includes individual laboratory 
work. 

Prereq. PHY 205c, d or equivalent and permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

PHY 260a,b/261c,d. Evaluation of Occupa- 
tional Health Problems 

Seminars, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
iveek. 5 units each term. Dr. Wegman, Members 
of the Occupational Health Program. 
Students will examine a specific occupational 
health problem either as an applied research 
project or as an analysis and evaluation of an 
occupational disease control program. The 
weekly seminar will provide the opportunity 
for student and faculty review of each project 
plan, data collection effort, approach to analy- 
sis, and final report. Faculty and guests will, in 



addition, discuss problems of a similar nature 
and how each have been evaluated and an- 
swered. 

Prereq. BIO 201a,b, EPI 201a or 221a,b, EPI 
202b, EHI 251c,d, EHI 254b and permission of 
the instructor. 

PHY 272a, b. Structure and Function of the 
Mammalian Respiratory System (Biology 272) 
To be given 1982-83; offered alternate years. 
Lectures. One .1-hour session each week. 
Demonstrations, discussions. To be arranged. 5 
units. Dr. Brain, Dr. Leith, Dr. Mead, Dr. 
McMahon (Professor of Biology, Division of 
Applied Sciences), Dr. Taylor (Professor of 
Biology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences). 
An introduction to the structure and morpho- 
metry of the respiratory system of mammals 
(from lung to mitochondria) integrating 
structural and morphometric information with 
physiological data. Requirements include lec- 
tures, demonstrations, discussions, term pa- 
per, and oral presentations. 
Prereq. College-level course in histology or cell 
biology. 

PHY 300. Tutorial Programs 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Opportunities are provided for tutorial work in 
the fields of respiratory biology, toxicology, 
occupational medicine, and radiobiology. 

PHY 350. Research 

Doctoral candidates may undertake laboratory 
or field research under the direction of faculty 
members working in the following areas: 
Occupational health 
Dr. Wegman, Dr. Baker, Dr. Boden. 
Radiobiology and experimental carcinogenesis 
Dr. Little, Dr. Kennedy, Dr. Reynolds. 
Respiratory biology and inhalation toxicology 
Dr. Mead, Dr. Banzett, Dr. Brain, Dr. But- 
ler, Dr. Drazen, Dr. Feldman, Dr. Hoppin, 
Dr. Leith, Dr. Loring, Dr. Sorokin, Dr. Val- 
berg. 

Toxicology 

Dr. Tashjian, Dr. Eisenstadt, Dr. Ofner, Dr. 
Richardson, Dr. Schonbrunn, Dr. Rice, Dr. 
Toscano. 

Community air pollution 
Dr. Ferris. 



Population Sciences 

POP 185a,b. Applied Mathematical 
Demography (Sociology 185) 
Lectures. Two I Vi-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Keyfitz. 

Topics include: probabilities of survival and of 
childbearing; the general one-sex model and 
the stable special case; parity and interbirth 
intervals; cohorts and periods; and extension 
to two sexes and to changing rates of birth and 
death. Also covered are application to popula- 
tion prediction, inferring birth rates from cen- 
suses, occupational mobility, migration, kin- 
ship, and effects of birth control. 
Prereq. One year of calculus. 

POP 191a, b. The Spatial Aspects of Societies 

(Sociology 191) 

Lectures. Two \ -hour sessions each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Alonso. 

Stresses the interaction of societies and their 
geography, focusing primarily on the historic 
and current development of the United States. 
Consideration is given to technology, institu- 
tions, ideology, health, the economy, and 
other factors influencing the growth and shape 
of cities, their relations to each other and to 
rural areas. 

POP 200a,b. Introduction to Population 

Sciences 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Professor Bell, Members of the Depart- 
ment. 

Reviews the basic elements of population 
change — fertility, mortality, and migration — 
and their interaction with social, cultural, and 
economic characteristics of societies at each 
stage of the demographic transition, i.e., for 
both developed and developing countries. In- 
troduces basic demographic concepts and 
methods, including age-sex pyramids, life ta- 
bles, and demographic rates. 

POP 201a, b. Introductory Seminar on 
Population Sciences 

Seminars. One 2-hour sesswn each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Wyon, Members of the Department. 
Supplements the introduction to population 
sciences presented in POP 200a, b. Most stu- 
dents will be concurrently enrolled in 200a, b. 
Through in-depth study of two or three de- 
fined human communities, students learn how 



120 / Courses of Instruction 



to trace immediate and underlying causes of 
rates of birth, death and migration as they have 
changed through the past one or two centuries, 
with inferences for the goals of public health 
and population policies and programs. Short 
papers are required. 

POP 202c, d. Student Project Design Seminar 

Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Wyon, Members of the Department. 
Oriented toward health and population prob- 
lems of communities. Each student selects a 
community and an appropriate health orpopu- 
lation problem. He she presents a critical sur- 
vey of the relevant literature and a project de- 
sign, to amplify understanding of the relative 
frequency of the selected problem in relation to 
other health or population problems of the 
community, and to increase or test the avail- 
able knowledge of causes of the problem. 
Prereq. Introductions to biostatistics, 
epidemiology and (preferably) population sci- 
ences. Enrollment after interview with in- 
structor. 

POP 203c,d. Demographic Methods for Devel- 
oping Countries — Mortality and Fertility 

Seminars. Two 2-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Larson. 

Introduces the basic demographic methods for 
analysis of mortality and fertility in developing 
countries. Includes estimation of mortality lev- 
els and trends from survey data and from pros- 
pective studies. Techniques for studying cause 
of death and age patterns of mortality are em- 
phasized. Fertility-related topics include: es- 
timation of fertility rates and trends from sur- 
vey data, faulty vital statistics data and pros- 
pective studies, cohort and period approaches 
to fertility trends, techniques for studying the 
determinants of fertility rates, and methods for 
evaluating the impact of family planning pro- 
grams. 

POP 204c, d. Biological Basis for Fertility 
Control 

Lectures. Two 1-hour sessions each week, with a 
third hour at the discretion of the instructor. 
Laboratory. Six 2-hour sessions, to be arranged. 5 
units. Dr. Salhanick, Members of the Depart- 
ment. 

Presents the fundamental physiology and bio- 
chemistry related to known and potential 
methods of family planning. Topics include: 



the biosynthesis, secretion, effects, and modes 
of action of the gonadal and gonadotropic 
hormones; the relationship of the natural 
steroid hormones to synthetic analogues is 
also discussed. Laboratory sessions include 
demonstrations of a family planning clinic, an 
infertility unit, and procedures for steriliza- 
tion and pregnancy termination. 
Prereq. POP 200a, b and appropriate science 
background. 

POP 207a, b. Essentials of Human 
Reproduction 

Not offered 1982-83. 
Lectures. Two 1-hour sessions each week. 
Laboratory. One 2-hour session each week. 5 
units. Dr. Berggren, Dr. Holtrop. 
Designed for non-physicians to review key 
facets of human reproduction. Considers basic 
and applied aspects of embryology, anatomy, 
physiology, endocrinology and genetics. Lec- 
tures and laboratory exercises are sup- 
plemented by required readings. Special atten- 
tion is directed to sexual behavior as it relates 
to reproduction and contraception. Field 
methods to assess reproductive functions are 
reviewed. A background in biology is desira- 
ble. 

POP 209a, b. Foundations of Agricultural 
Sciences (Biology 195) 

Lectures, seminars. Two 1 Vz-hour sessions each 
week. 5 units. Dr. Levins. 

Examines patterns of world food production as 
it develops from the interaction of social and 
biological systems: evolution of agro-ecosys- 
tems, principles of plant growth and produc- 
tivity, pests and diseases, ecology of farming 
systems, consequences of technical choices, is- 
sues of agricultural change, and research 
strategies. 

Prereq. Course in biology or permission of the 
instructor. 

POP 210c,d. Population Biology 

Lectures. Two lVz-hour sessions each week. 5 
units. Dr. Lewontin, Dr. Levins. 
Approaches population studies from a general 
biological standpoint. Attempts to integrate 
population and community ecology, popula- 
tion genetics, and biogeography. Topics in- 
clude: the structure of the environment in 
space and time and its interaction with or- 
ganisms, simple single-species growth dynam- 
ics, age-dependent demography, two-species 



interactions, multiple-species community dy- 
namics, evolution of the niche, elements of 
population genetics, and topics in biogeo- 
graphy. 

Prereq. College courses in calculus and biol- 
ogy- 
POP 212a, b. An Economic Approach to 
Population Policy 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week, with a 
third hour at the discretion of the instructor. 5 
units. Dr. Repetto. 

Presents the economics relevant to the formula- 
tion and evaluation of population policies in 
developing countries and surveys knowledge 
about the effectiveness of intervention strate- 
gies. Covers welfare economics of population 
policies; interactions between fertility and 
economic development; the impact on popula- 
tion growth of policies which affect incomes, 
education, survivorship, old-age security, and 
related variables, as well as conventional fam- 
ily planning programs. 

Prereq. POP 200a,b and HPM 205a, b or equiva- 
lent. 

POP 214c,d. The Biological Determinants 
of Fecundity, Environmental Factors, and 
Population Growth 

Lectures. One 2-hour session each week. 2.5 
units. Dr. Frisch. 

Examines the direct effect of environmental 
factors such as nutrition and physical activity 
on female and male reproductive ability 
throughout the reproductive span. Topics in- 
clude: adolescent growth, age of menarche, ef- 
fects of exercise on the menstrual cycle, male 
maturation, age-specific fertility; pregnancy 
wastage, lactational amenorrhea and the birth 
interval, and age of menopause. Also included 
are the basic physiology and endocrinology of 
human reproduction, the history of birth con- 
trol and the interaction of biological factors and 
social customs affecting population growth. 



Population Sciences / 121 



POP 216c, d. Comparative Analysis of Public 
Policies in Developing Countries (Govern- 
ment 211) 

Lectures, seminars, workshops. One 2-hour 
session each week. 5 units. Dr. John D. 
Montgomery (Professor of Public Administra- 
tion, John F. Kennedy School of Government). 
Examines patterns of policy making across cul- 
tures and issue areas, including interactions 
between policies and social contexts. Surveys 
Third World policies for dealing with such 
problems as population (fertility and migra- 
tion); malnutrition; land reform; and manage- 
ment of large-scale irrigation systems. Applies 
the policy sciences approach to the formulation 
and implementation of large-scale programs of 
public intervention in social processes. 

POP 217b. Introduction to Community Diag- 
nosis of Birth and Death Rates in Developing 
Countries 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 1.25 units. Dr. Wyon. 
Helps students distinguish within communi- 
ties those kinds of persons at high risk of seri- 
ous illness, death, and unwanted births. It uses 
data from studies at national and local levels to 
trace underlying causes of these events as the 
basis for designing feasible, effective, and 
simple preventive measures. Provides founda- 
tion for POP 202c, d and for other health and 
population courses considering policies and 
programs. 

Prereq. Introductory courses in biostatistics, 
epidemiology, and (preferably) population 
sciences. 

POP 220d. Human Ecology 

Lectures, seminars. Two 1-hour sessions each 
week. 1.25 units. Dr. Levins. 
Provides a broad overview of the human 
ecosystem as it emerges out of, but is different 
from, pre-human ecology. For each area of 
ecology, general principles will first be consid- 
ered followed by examples from different 
human societies. Also considers the role of 
knowledge and conscious planning as an as- 
pect of human ecology and examines ap- 
proaches toward the solution of ecological 
problems. 

Prereq. Assumes basic knowledge of biology. 



HPM-POP 262c,d. Health Planning in 
Developing Countries 

Lectures, seminars. One 2-hour session each 
week. 

Laboratory. One 1-hour session each week (op- 
tional). 5 units. Dr. Cash, Dr. Shepard. 
(Course described under Health Policy and 
Management.) 

POP-HPM 263c. Case Studies in Design and 
Management of Population and Community 
Health Programs 

Case discussions, seminars. Two 2-hour ses- 
sions each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Wyon, Members 
of the Department. 

A managerial perspective on the problems of 
developing and implementing population and 
primary health care programs in Third World 
nations. Problems are examined from the level 
of managers of clinics, community and na- 
tional programs. Topics covered primarily 
through case studies based on family planning 
and primary health care programs, particularly 
at the community and regional levels. 

POP-HPM 264d. Case Studies in Comparative 
Design and Management of Population and 
Health Programs 

Case discussions, seminars. Two 2-hour ses- 
sions each week. 2.5 units. Dr. Wyon, Members 
of the Department. 

Addresses the same problems as POP-HPM 
263c with emphasis on the management of 
population, primary health care and social- 
economic development programs in a broad 
range of national contexts. 
Students may take POP-HPM 263c and POP- 
HPM 264d separately or together. 

POP 285a,b. Applied Mathematical Demog- 
raphy Seminar (Sociology 285) 
Seminars. One 2-hour session each week. 5 units. 
Dr. Keyfitz. 

Consists of research on the topics of POP 
185a,b. 

Enrollment subject to approval of the in- 
structor. 

POP 300. Tutorial Programs 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Students at the master's level may make ar- 
rangements for tutorial work and special read- 
ing on topics related to population problems. 
There may be an opportunity to consider the 
design of studies, programs, or analysis of 
data. 



POP 330e. Field Studies 

During the week between the fall and spring 
semesters and/or a week at the end of the aca- 
demic year. Students must sign up for the 
course with the Department by October 15, and 
be responsible for all or part of the travel costs. 
Dr. Wyon. 

Field Trip to Haiti 

The objective of this field study is to provide 
exposure to the urban, rural, and development 
problems of a developing country. Students 
visit the homes of rural farmers to observe the 
living conditions of these families and their 
accessibility to health care facilities and pro- 
grams. Students also see rural health centers, 
health surveillance teams, nutrition programs, 
and the headquarters of various health pro- 
grams. What has been observed, how it relates 
to data previously collected, and what pro- 
grams can be developed to improve the condi- 
tions are then discussed with the group's 
leaders and with local health planners. 
Enrollment limited to 10 and subject to ap- 
proval of the instructors. 

POP 350-355. Research 

Time and credit to be arranged. 
Candidates for doctoral degrees may undertake 
research in the Department or may integrate 
research in population sciences with a doctoral 
program in another department or at the Cen- 
ter for Population Studies. 
Members of the Department and of the Center 
for Population Studies are currently engaged in 
research in the following areas: 



350 


Field studies and programs 




Dr. Wyon, Dr. Guerrero, Dr. G. 




Berggren. 


351 


Biomedicine and reproductive physiology 




Dr. Salhanick. 


352 


Demography 




Dr. Keyfitz. 


353 


Population ethics 




Dr. Dyck, Dr. Potter. 


354 


Population economics 




Dr. Repetto. 


355 


Complex systems 




Dr. Levins. 



122 / Courses of Instruction 



The following courses, offered by other facul- 
ties of Harvard University, are among those 
that may be of particular interest to students of 
population sciences. They are open to qualified 
students from the School of Public Health. 

Ethics 2695. Seminar: Ethical Aspects of Popu- 
lation Policy 

Half course. Not offered in Spnng 1983. Dyck. 

Sociology 251. Seminar: Social Policy and 
Population Issues in the Developed Countries 

Half course (spring term). M., 2-4. Alonso. 
A broad range of issues in the developed coun- 
tries, including education, health, housing, 
social security, status of women, labor policy, 
racial and group prejudice, are affected by de- 
clining fertility, growing up of the baby boom 
generation, and international migration. Stres- 
ses social processes involved and the policy 
responses proposed and tried out. (Offered in 
the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.) 



Sanitary Engineering 

ENG SCI 171. Chemistry of the Aqueous 
Environment 

Half course (fall term). M., W., F., atl. Lab. Tu. 
1-4. Professor Butler. 

Chemical principles applicable to environmen- 
tal science and engineering. Emphasis on pH, 
complex formation, and solubility in mul- 
ticomponent systems. Sources, occurrence, 
and chemical reactions of important con- 
stituents in natural waters. Natural aquatic cy- 
cles and their disruption by human activity. 
Processes affecting the fate of toxic chemicals in 
fresh water and marine environments. 
Prereq. CHEM 11 or equivalent. 

ENG SCI 172. Hydrologic Cycles 

Not offered 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Half course {fall term). Tu., Th., 10-11:30. 
Professor Fienng. 

Physical mechanisms which govern the 
movement of water over, under and on the 
earth. Water budgets, basin characteristics, 
groundwater transport, direct and indirect ob- 
servational methods, sampling and network 
techniques, models of water bodies, quantita- 
tive and qualitative assessments of water re- 
source systems, mechanistics and statistical 
descriptions of extremes. 

Prereq. APPL MATH 21b and one year of 
college-level physics. 

ENG SCI 173. Introduction to Environmental 
Microbiology 

To be given 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Half course (spring term). M., W., F., at 11 and 
laboratory hours to be arranged. 
Professor Mitchell. 

Introduction to the ecology of microorganisms. 
Examination of the role of microorganisms in 
water pollution and its control. 
Prereq. Biology 7 or its equivalent. 



ENG SCI 175. Introduction to Environmental 
Engineering 

To be given 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Half course (spring term). Tu., Th., 11-12:30. 
Professors Rogers and Harrington. 
Introduces engineering technologies for con- 
trol of the environment and relates them to 
underlying scientific principles. Efficient de- 
signs of environmental management facilities 
and systems. Cases from aquatic, terrestrial 
and atmospheric environments will be dis- 
cussed. 

For graduates without background in 
environmental engineenng. Prereq. Any two 
of ENG SCI 171, 172, or 173, which may be 
taken concurrently. APPL MATH 21a and 21b 
or equivalent mathematical background. 

ENG 250. Design of Water Resource Systems 

Half course (fall term). Tu., Th., 10-11:30. 
Professor Thomas. 

Principles of engineering and economic analy- 
sis applied to water resource systems. Func- 
tional design of management systems for col- 
lection, storage, conveyance, treatment, and 
distribution of water. Uses techniques of oper- 
ations research to develop methods for plan- 
ning integrated systems of dams, reservoirs, 
canals, pipe networks, and treatment plants. 
Applications in water supply, irrigation, hy- 
dropower, environmental protection, and con- 
servation of wildlife. 

Prereq. APPL MATH 105a; ENG SCI 121, 123 or 
equivalents. 

ENG SCI 251. Seminar: Technology Choice in 
Water Resources Development 

Not offered 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Half course (spring term). Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Rogers. 

Discusses the technology available for water 
resources development. Relates the charac- 
teristics of the technology to methods for 
evaluating technology choice. Focuses upon 
water supply and delivery systems and hydro- 
power facilities. Emphasis on applications in 
developing countries. 

ENG 257. Seminar: Models for Environmental 
Systems Planning 

Ha\icourse( throughout the year). Tu., 12-2. Pro- 
fessor Rogers. 

Critical evaluation of current systems applica- 
tions; biology and chemistry in environmental 
science, with emphasis on models for the anal- 



Sanitary Engineering 123 



ysis of water quality standards, optimally, and 
resilience in water-resource systems. Papers 
and presentations are required. Students in- 
tending to enroll should meet with the in- 
structor to arrange scheduling before study 
cards are due. 

ENG 270. Engineering Systems for 
Environmental Control 

Not offered 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Half course {spring term). M., IV., ¥., at 10. 
Professor Harrington. 

Provision of urban water; engineering aspects 
of the collection and disposal of spent water 
and solid wastes; significant interchanges be- 
tween the gaseous, liquid, and solid phases of 
the environment; geographic interchanges; 
time-dependent developments. Data collection 
and processing for monitoring and control; 
maintenance and operation of pollution control 
systems. 

Prereq. ENG SCI 123 or permission of in- 
structor. 

ENG 273. Water Pollution Microbiology 

To be given 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Half course {fall term). Hours to be arranged. 
Professor Mitchell. 

Advanced discussion of the role of microorgan- 
isms as both pollutants and purifying agents. 
Particular attention to ecological approaches to 
pollution control. Eutrophication, microbial 
imbalances, degradation of toxic chemicals, 
and a critical discussion of current pollution 
control methods. 

Prereq. ENG SCI 173 or equivalent. 

ENG 274. Chemical Models of Natural and 
Polluted Waters 

To be given 1983-84; offered alternate years. 
Half course {spring term). Tu., Th.. 1-2:30. 
Professor Butler. 

Chemical aspects of aqueous environmental 
systems. Mathematical models include ther- 
modynamic, kinetic, biological, and hydrody- 
namic processes. Applications to water quality 
management, pollution control, limnology, 
oceanography, and geology. 
Prereq. Physical chemistry (e.g., CHEM 11, 
ENG SCI 171) and some experience with biol- 
ogy and geology. 



Tropical Public Health 

TPH 201a. Ecology, Epidemiology, and Con- 
trol of Important Parasitic Diseases of Devel- 
oping Areas 

Lectures, seminars, demonstrations. Two 
1-hour sessions and one 2-hour session each week. 
3 units. Dr. Michelson, Members of the De- 
partment. 

Provides an introduction to ecological and epi- 
demiologic concepts basic to the control of in- 
fectious agents. Considers important parasitic 
and viral diseases of particular significance in 
the developing areas of the world. Epidemio- 
logic principles of vector-associated diseases 
are elucidated through study of entities such as 
malaria and schistosomiasis. Prior knowledge 
of the pathogenesis of disease produced by 
infectious agents is desirable. 

TPH 203d. Perspectives in Tropical Health: 
The Background for Decision Analysis 

Not given 1982-83. 

Lectures, conferences. One 2-hour session each 
week. 1 unit. Guest Lecturers. 
Provides background information on envi- 
ronmental, social, economic, and political fac- 
tors that influence health programs in the trop- 
ics. At each session a distinguished guest lec- 
turer covers an assigned topic, including sub- 
jects such as the development of professional 
education, problems of agriculture, nutrition, 
and water supply, and the political background 
of international cooperation. Each presenta- 
tion followed by informal student discussion. 
Enrollment open to all students. 

TPH 204c. Introduction to the Techniques of 
Investigation of Parasitic Infections 

Lectures, laboratory, seminars. Two 3-hour ses- 
sions each week. One 2-hour additional laboratory 
session each week, to be arranged. 5 units. 
Dr. Pan. 

Emphasizes laboratory methods for the study 
of parasitic diseases of public health impor- 
tance. Provides exposure to theory and applica- 
tion techniques essential to epidemiologic and 
laboratory investigation. Life cycles of several 
parasites maintained and examined with re- 
spect to detection and quantification of infec- 
tion, immunity, and control. 
Enrollment limited to 15 and subject to ap- 
proval of the instructors. Preference given to 
concentrators in tropical public health and mi- 
crobiology. 



TPH 205c. Clinical and Pathologic Features of 
Tropical Diseases 

Case presentations, clinico-pathologic con- 
ferences, demonstrations. One 2-hour session 
each week. 1 unit. Dr. Dammin, Dr. Boyer, Dr. 
Franz von Lichtenberg (Professor of Pathology, 
Harvard Medical School), Members of the De- 
partment, Members of the Pathology Depart- 
ment. 

Designed for students particularly interested 
in tropical medicine. Emphasis is on the 
clinico-pathologic aspects of tropical diseases. 
At each session disease entities are introduced 
by presenting a clinical case, and pertinent 
clinical and pathologic features of the disease 
are then reviewed. 

Enrollment subject to approval of the in- 
structors. 

TPH 206d. Principles of Vector Biology 

Lectures, laboratories, seminars, field trips. 

Three 1-hour sessions and two 2-hour sessions 
each week. 5 units. Dr. Spielman, Dr. Michel- 
son. 

The manner in which arthropods and molluscs 
transmit disease and the principles of vector 
control are discussed from ecological, physio- 
logical, and genetic points of view. Class ses- 
sions introduce concepts and techniques cur- 
rently employed in controlling vector-borne 
disease. Weekend field trips provide an oppor- 
tunity for students to apply skills acquired in 
the classroom. 

Prereq. TPH 201a or suitable biology back- 
ground, and permission of the instructors. 

TPH 208d. Current Problems in 
Schistosomiasis 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Seminars, laboratory exercises. One 3-hour ses- 
sion each week. 2 units. Dr. Michelson, Dr. 
Chernin, Dr. Pan, Dr. Weller. 
The problems posed by schistosomiasis as an 
expanding health hazard are presented in a 
series of seminars and laboratory exercises. 
Emphasis is given to the biology of snail vec- 
tors, to problems of assessment of significance 
of the disease, and to the potentials of various 
approaches to control. Opportunity to become 
familiar with appropriate techniques is af- 
forded in the laboratory. 

Prereq. TPH 201a or permission of the in- 
structors. 



124 / Courses of Instruction 



TPH 210d. Current Problems in Malariology 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Seminars, laboratory exercises. One 3-hour ses- 
sion each week. 2 units. Dr. Chernin, Dr. Spiel- 
man, Dr. Weller, Members of the Department. 
Supplements the subject material on malaria 
offered in TPH 201a and TPH 204c. Particular 
attention is given to problems now encoun- 
tered in eradication and control programs. In 
the laboratory, experience is provided with 
procedures essential to the epidemiologic in- 
vestigation of malaria. 

Prereq. TPH 201a and permission of the in- 
structors. 

TPH 218d. Immunology of Parasitic Diseases 

Not offered 1982-83. 

Lectures, discussions. One 2-hour session each 
week. 1.25 units. Dr. Boyer, Guest Lecturers. 
Provides an introduction to the immunology of 
parasitic diseases for students with a basic 
knowledge of immunology. Includes the gen- 
eral principles of immunology relating to the 
host-parasite relationship and the immunolog- 
ical aspects of selected parasitic diseases. 
Prereq. Suitable course in basic immunology. 

TPH 300a,b,c,d,e. Tutorial Programs 

Laboratory exercises. Time and credit to be ar- 
ranged. 

Individual work for candidates at the master's 
degree level may be carried out under supervi- 
sion of a member of the Department. Various 
parasites of medical importance are main- 
tained and are available for studies on metabol- 
ism, host-parasite relationships, and chemo- 
therapy. Arrangements subject to approval of 
the instructor. 



TPH 350. Research 

Doctoral candidates or qualified full-time spe- 
cial students may undertake original investiga- 
tions in the laboratory or in the field by ar- 
rangement with the Chairman of the Depart- 
ment. 

Members of the Department are currently en- 
gaged in the following areas of research: 

— Biology, host-parasite relationships, and con- 
trol of molluscan vectors of schistosomiasis and 
of other parasitic infections 

— Population genetics, nutrition, and reproduc- 
tion of medically important arthropods 

— Immunology of protozoa and helminths 

— Molecular biology of protozoa and helminths 

— Arthropod transmission of viral, protozoan, 
and helminthic agents 

— Cultivation in vitro of parasitic helminths and 
protozoa of medical importance 



I 



Officers of Instruction and Research 



Members of the Faculty 

William Alonso, A.B., M.C.P (Harvard Uni- 
versity); Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania), 
Richard Saltonstall Professor of Population Pol- 
icy. 

Mary Ochsenhirt Amdur, S B. (University of 
Pittsburgh); Ph.D. (Cornell University), Asso- 
ciate Professor of Toxicology (Physiology); Lec- 
turer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

James Robert Anderson, A.B. (State University 
of New York at Buffalo); Ph.D. (University of 
Washington at Seattle), Assistant Professor of 
Biostatistics; Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. 

Harry Nicholas Antoniades, B.S., Ph.D. 
(Athens University, Greece), Professor of Bio- 
chemistry (Nutrition); Senior Investigator, Blood 
Research Institute, Inc., Boston. 

James Edward Austin, A. A. (Flint Community 
Junior College); B.B.A. (University of Michi- 
gan); M.B.A., D.B A. (Harvard University), 
Lecturer on Nutrition Policy and Programs 
(Nutrition); Professor of Business Administration, 
Harvard Business School. 

Thomas Ferdinand Babor, A.B. (Manhattan 
College); A.M., Ph.D. (University of Arizona); 
M.P.H. (Harvard University), Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Psychology in the Faculty of Medicine 
and the Faculty of Public Health (Behavioral 
Sciences). 

John Christian Bailar, III, A.B. (University of 
Colorado); M.D. (Yale University); Ph.D. 
(American University), Lecturer on Biostatis- 
tics; Senior Scientific Advisor, Environmental 
Protection Agency. 

Edward Lamar Baker, Jr., A.B. (Vanderbilt 
University); M.D. (Baylor College of 
Medicine); M.P.H., S.M. in Phys. (Harvard 
University), Assistant Professor of Occupa- 
tional Medicine (Physiology). 

Robert Bruce Banzett, S B. (Pennsylvania State 
University); Ph.D. (University of California at 
Davis), Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Kenneth Paul Barclay, A.B. (Tufts University); 
M.B.A. (University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst), Member of the Faculty of Public 
Health, Associate Dean for Administration. 
Diana Barrett, A.B. (Sweet Briar College); S.M. 
(Boston University); M.B.A. , D.B. A. (Harvard 
University), Assistant Professor of Manage- 
ment (Health Policy and Management). 
Colin Banks Begg, B.Sc, Ph.D. (Glasgow Uni- 
versity), Assistant Professor of Biostatistics; 
Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. 



David Elliott Bell, A.B. (Pomona College); 
A.M. (Harvard University), Clarence James 
Gamble Professor of Population Sciences and 
International Health (Population Sciences) and 
Director of the Center for Population Studies. 

Robert Charles Benfari, A.B. (Colby College); 
M.B.A. (Babson Institute); Ph.D. (Yeshiva 
University); S.M. in Hyg. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Associate Professor of Psychology (Be- 
havioral Sciences). 

Gretchen Mary Berggren, A.B. (Nebraska State 
College); M.D. (University of Nebraska); S.M. 
in Hyg. (Harvard University), Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Population Sciences; Science Scholar, 
Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute, Radcliffe (to 
December 1982). 

Bengt Erik Bjarngard, M.Sc, D.Sc. (University 
of Lund, Sweden), Lecturer on Medical Radia- 
tion Physics (Environmental Health Sciences); 
Professor of Radiation Therapy, Harvard Medical 
School. 

Konrad Emil Bloch, Ph.D. (Columbia Univer- 
sity), Professor of Science (Nutrition) in the 
Faculty of Public Health (to December, 1982) 
and Higgins Professor of Biochemistry in the 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Emeritus). 

Elkan Rogers Blout, A.B. (Princeton Univer- 
sity); Ph.D. (Columbia University), Member of 
the Faculty of Public Health and Dean for Aca- 
demic Affairs; Edward S. Harkness Professor of 
Biological Chemistry, Harvard Medical School. 

Leslie Irvin Boden, A.B. (Brandeis Univer- 
sity); Ph.D. (Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology), Assistant Professor of Economics 
(Physiology and Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Markley Holmes Boyer, A.B. (Princeton Uni- 
versity); M.D. (University of Pennsylvania); 
D.Phil. (Magdalen College, Oxford Univer- 
sity); M.P.H. (Harvard University), Assistant 
Professor of Tropical Public Health. 

Joseph David Brain, A.B. (Taylor University); 
S.M., S.M. in Hyg., S.D. in Hyg. (Harvard 
University), Professor of Physiology. 

Laurence George Branch, A.B. (Marquette 
University); A.M., Ph.D. (Loyola University), 
Assistant Professor of Social Psychology (Ma- 
ternal and Child Health and Aging); Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Preventive and Social Medicine, Harvard 
Medical School. 

Peter Braun, S.B. (Yale University); M.D. (Co- 
lumbia University), Lecturer on Public Health 

(Health Policy and Management). 



J. Larry Brown, A.B. (Anderson College), A.M. 
(University of California, Los Angeles), 
M.S.W., Ph.D. (Brandeis University), Lecturer 
on Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment) and Director of the Community Health 
Improvement Program. 

Jonathan Bernard Brown, S B. (Portland State 
University); M.P.P., Ph.D. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Assistant Professor of Public Policy in 
Health Planning (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

William Alfred Burgess, S.B. (Tufts Univer- 
sity); S.M. (Harvard University), Associate 
Professor of Occupational Health Engineering 
(Environmental Health Sciences); Corporate 
Manager of Industrial Hygiene, Polaroid Corp. 
James Preston Butler, A.B. (Pomona College); 
A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard University), Assistant 
Professor of Biomathematics (Physiology). 
John Caims, M.D., B.A., B.M.,B.Ch., D.M. 
(Oxford University); A.M. (hon.) (Harvard 
University), Professor of Microbiology. 

Richard Alan Cash, S.B. (University of Wis- 
consin); M.D. (New York University); M.P.H. 
(The Johns Hopkins University), Lecturer on 
Tropical Public Health; Institute Fellow, Har- 
vard Institute for International Development. 
EliChemin.S.B. (Collegeof City of New York); 
A.M. (University of Michigan); S.D. (The 
Johns Hopkins University), Professor of Tropi- 
cal Public Health (on leave 1982-83). 
Douglas Winslow Cooper, A.B. (Cornell Uni- 
versity); S.M. (Pennsylvania State University); 
Ph.D. (Harvard University), Associate Profes- 
sor of Environmental Physics (Environmental 
Health Sciences). 

Allen Latham Cudworth, B E E. (University of 
Alabama); M.E.E. (Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology); S.D. in Hyg. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Lecturer on Applied Acoustics and Envi- 
ronmental Health (Environmental Health Sci- 
ences); Vice President of Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Company and Director, Hopkinton Research Cen- 
ter. 

William John Curran, J.D. (Boston College); 
LL.M., S.M. in Hyg. (Harvard University), 
Frances Glessner Lee Professor of Legal Medi- 
cine in the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty 
of Public Health (Health Policy and Management 
and Maternal and Child Health and Aging). 



John Roubcn David, A.B. (College of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago); M.D. (University of 
Chicago Medical School); A.M. (hon.) (Har- 
vard University), John LaPorte Given Professor 
Of Tropical Public Health; Professor of Medicine, 
Harvard Medical School. 

Richard Dennis, S.B. (Northeastern Univer- 
sity); S.M. (Harvard University), Associate 
Professor of Applied Environmental Health 
Engineering (Environmental Health Sciences); 
Director, Pollution Control Laboratory, G.C.A. 
Corporation, Bedford. 

Eva Yona Deykin, A.B. (Radcliffe College); 
S.M. (Simmons College); M.P.H., Dr.P.H. 
(Harvard University), Assistant Professor of 
Social Work (Maternal and Child Health and 
Aging). 

Jeffrey Mark Drazen, S B. (Tufts University); 
M.D. (Harvard University), Associate Profes- 
sor of Physiology; Associate Professor of 
Medicine, Harvard Medical School. 

Margaret Elizabeth Drolette, A.B. (Radcliffe 
College); M.P.H., Ph.D. (Harvard University), 
Professor of Biostatistics. 

Johanna Todd Dwyer, S.B. (Cornell Univer- 
sity); S.M. (University of Wisconsin); S.M. in 
Hyg., S.D. in Hyg. (Harvard University), Lec- 
turer on Maternal and Child Health Nutrition 

(Maternal and Child Health and Aging); Director, 
Stern Nutrition Center, Tufts Medical Center. 

Arthur James Dyck, A.B. (Tabor College); 
A.M. (University of Kansas); Ph.D. (Harvard 
University), Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of 
Population Ethics; Member of the Faculty of the 
Harvard Divinity School (on leave 1982-83). 

Diane Douglas Eardley, A.B., Ph.D. (Univer- 
sity of California at Berkeley), Assistant Profes- 
sor of Immunology (Microbiology). 

Eric Eisenstadt, A.B , Ph.D. (Washington Uni- 
versity), Assistant Professor of Biology (Mi- 
crobiology and Physiology). 

Michael John Ellenbecker, B E E. (University 
of Minnesota); S.M. (University of Wisconsin); 
S.M. in Env.H., S.D. in Env.H. (Harvard Uni- 
versity), Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Hygiene Engineering (Environmental Health 
Sciences and Physiology). 

Robert Curtis Ellison, S.B. (Davidson College); 
M.D. (Medical University of South Carolina); 
S.M. in Epid. (Harvard University), Lecturer 
on Epidemiology; Associate Professor of Pediat- 
rics, Harvard Medical School- 



Myron Elmer Essex, S.B. (University of Rhode 
Island); D.V.M., S.M. (Michigan State Univer- 
sity); Ph.D. (University of California), A.M. 
(hon.) (Harvard University), Professor of Mi- 
crobiology. 

Lawrence Adness Falk, Jr., A.B. (Centenary 
College); A.M. (University of Houston), Ph.D. 
(University of Arkansas), Associate Professor 
of Microbiology; Associate Professor of Mi- 
crobiology and Molecular Genetics, Harvard Med- 
ical School. 

James Joseph Feeney, A.B. (Dartmouth Col- 
lege); M.D. (Harvard University), Member of 
the Faculty of Public Health; Director of the 
Medical Area Health Service. 

Henry Arthur Feldman, A.B. (Swarthmore Col- 
lege); A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard University), As- 
sistant Professor of Applied Mathematics 

(Physiology and Biostatistics). 

Penny Hollander Feldman, A.B. (Radcliffe Col- 
lege); A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard University), Lec- 
turer on Political Science (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Michael Lawrence Feldstein, B.A., M.Math. 
(University of Waterloo); Ph.D. (State Univer- 
sity of New York at Buffalo), Assistant Profes- 
sor of Biostatistics; The Children's Hospital Med- 
ical Center. 

Benjamin Greeley Ferris, Jr., A.B., M.D. (Har- 
vard University), Professor of Environmental 
Health and Safety (Physiology); Director of 
Environmental Health and Safety, University 
Health Services. 

Harvey Vernon Fineberg, A.B., M.D., M.P.P., 
Ph.D. (Harvard University), Professor of 
Health Policy and Management. 
Melvin William First, S.B. (Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology); S.M., S.D. (Harvard 
University), Professor of Environmental 
Health Engineering (Environmental Health Sci- 
ences). 

Renny Theodore Franceschi, S.B. (University 
of Vermont); Ph.D. (Purdue University), Assis- 
tant Professor of Biochemistry (Nutrition). 

Howard Stanley Frazier, Ph.B. (University of 
Chicago); M.D. (Harvard University), Director 
of the Center for the Analysis of Health Prac- 
tices and Member of the Faculty of Public 
Health; Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical 
School. 



Rose Epstein Frisch, A.B. (Smith College); 
A.M. (Columbia University); Ph.D. (Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin), Lecturer on Population 
Studies (Population Sciences). 

Jane Gardner, S.B., S.M. (Boston College); 
S.M. in M.C.H., S.D. in M.C.H. (Harvard Uni- 
versity), Assistant Professor of Maternal and 
Child Health. 

Richard David Gelber, S.B. (Cornell Univer- 
sity); S.M. (Stanford University); Ph.D. (Cor- 
nell University), Assistant Professor of Bio- 
statistics; Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. 

Alfred Gellhorn, M.D. (Washington Univer- 
sity); D.Sc. (hon.) (Amherst College); A.M. 
(hon.) (University of Pennsylvania); D.Sc. 
(hon.) (City College of New York), Visiting 
Professor of Health Policy and Management; 
Professor of Community Medicine, University of 
North Carolina. 

Rebecca Sue dolman A.B. (University of 
Michigan); Ph.D. (State University of New 
York at Buffalo), Assistant Professor of Bio- 
statistics; Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. 

Robert Pershing Geyer, S B., S.M., Ph.D. 
(University of Wisconsin); A.M. (hon.) (Har- 
vard University), Professor of Nutrition. 

Peter Goldman, A.B. (Cornell University); 
A.M. (Harvard University); M.D. (The Johns 
Hopkins University); Professor of Health Sci- 
ences in Nutrition; Maxwell Finland Professor of 
Clinical Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School. 

Carlos Gitler, S B., S.M., Ph.D., (University of 
Wisconsin), Visiting Professor of Tropical Pub- 
lic Health; Professor, Weizmann Institute of Sci- 
ence, Israel. 

Steven Lawrence Gortmaker, A.B. (University 
of Michigan); S.M., Ph.D. (University of Wis- 
consin), Assistant Professor of Sociology (Be- 
havioral Sciences). 

Christopher Keith Grant, S B., Ph.D. (Univer- 
sity of London), Assistant Professor of Im- 
munology (Microbiology). 

Nancy Mueller Gutensohn, A.B. (Beloit Col- 
lege); S.M. in Epid., S.D. in Epid. (Harvard 
University), Assistant Professor of Epidemiol- 
ogy- 



128 I Officers of Instruction 



David Alan Hamburg, A.B., M.D. (Indiana 
University, Professor of Psychiatry (Behavioral 
Sciences and Health Policy and Management) in 
the Faculty of Public Health; Professor of 
Health Policy and Psychiatry in the Faculty of 
Medicine; John D. MacArthur Professor of 
Health Policy and Management in the Faculty 
of Government; Chairman of the Division of 
Human Behavior and Health Policy, Department 
of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Director 
of the Harvard University Division of Health Pol- 
icy Research and Education. 

Tamara K. Hareven, A.B., (Hebrew Univer- 
sity); A.M. (Cincinatti University); Ph.D. 
(Ohio State University), Lecturer on Popula- 
tion Studies (Population Sciences); Associate 
Professor, Clark University . 

Joseph John Harrington, B.C.E. (Manhattan 
College); A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard University), 
Professor of Environmental Health Engineer- 
ing (Population Sciences and Sanitary Engineer- 
ing) in the Faculty of Public Health and Gordon 
McKay Professor of Environmental Engineer- 
ing in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 

William Alan Haseltine, A.B. (University of 
California at Berkeley); Ph.D. (Harvard Uni- 
versity), Associate Professor of Microbiology; 
Associate Professor of Pathology, Harvard Medi- 
cal School. 

Kenneth Cronise Hayes, A.B. (Wesleyan Uni- 
versity); D.V.M. (Cornell University); Ph.D. 
(University of Connecticut), Associate Profes- 
sor of Nutrition. 

Maxine Delores Hayes, A.B. (Spelman Col- 
lege); M.D. (State University of New York at 
Buffalo); M.P.H. (Harvard University), Lec- 
turer on Maternal and Child Health; Executive 
DirectorlMedical Director, Hinds-Rankin Urban 
Health Innovations Project. 

John Hedley-Whyte, B.A., M.B., B.Chir., 
M.A., M.D. (Cambridge University, England), 
Member of the Faculty of Public Health (Health 
Policy and Management); David S. Sheridan Pro- 
fessor of Anaesthesia and Respiratory Therapy, 
Harvard Medical School. 

David Hemenway, A.B. (Harvard University); 
A.M. (University of Michigan); Ph.D. (Har- 
vard University), Assistant Professor of Politi- 
cal Economy (Health Policy and Management). 

Manuel Guillermo Herrera-Acena, A.B. , M.D. 
(Harvard University), Associate Professor of 
Medicine (Nutrition). 



Regina Elbinger Herzlinger, S B. (Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology); D.B.A. (Harvard 
University), Member of the Faculty of Public 
Health (Health Policy and Management); Profes- 
sor of Business Administration, Harvard Business 
School. 

Howard Haym Hiatt, M.D. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Dean of the Faculty of Public Health; Pro- 
fessor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. 

William Carson Hinds, B.M.E. (Cornell Uni- 
versity); S.M. in Hyg., S.D. in Env. H. (Har- 
vard University), Associate Professor of Envi- 
ronmental Health Engineering (Environmental 
Health Sciences). 

Rodney Hoff, S.B. (University of Wisconsin); 
M.P.H. (University of North Carolina); S.M., 
S.D. in Tr.P.H. (Harvard University), Assis- 
tant Professor of Tropical Public Health. 

Donald Frederick Hornig, S B., Ph.D. (Har- 
vard University), Alfred North Whitehead Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry in Public Health (Physiol- 
ogy); Director of Interdisciplinary Programs in 
Health. 

William Ching-Lung Hsiao, A.B. (Ohio Wes- 
leyan University); M.P.A., Ph.D. (Harvard 
University), Associate Professor of Economics 
(Health Policy and Management); Member of the 
Faculty of Harvard Business School. 

George Barkley Hutchison, A.B., M.D., 
M.P.H. (Harvard University), Professor of 
Epidemiology. 

Roland Harrison Ingram, Jr., S.B. (University 
of Alabama); M.D. (Yale University), Member 
of the Faculty of Public Health (Physiology); 
Parker V. Francis Professor of Medicine, Harvard 
Medical School. 

Philip F. Judy, S.B., S.M., Ph.D. (University of 
Wisconsin), Lecturer on Medical Radiation 
Physics (Environmental Health Sciences); Assis- 
tant Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical 
School. 

Nancy Morgan Kane, S.B. (Simmons College); 
M.B.A., D.B.A. (Harvard University), Assis- 
tant Professor of Management (Health Policy 
and Management). 

Jack Kasten, S.B. (Michigan State University); 
M.P.H. (University of Michigan); J.D. (Boston 
College), Lecturer on Health Services Adminis- 
tration (Health Policy and Management); Vice 
President, Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge. 



Ann Randtke Kennedy, A.B. (Vassar College); 
S.M. in Env. H., S.D. in Phys. (Harvard Uni- 
versity), Associate Professor of Radiobiology 

(Physiology). 

Ralph Leo Kent, Jr., A.B. (University of Notre 
Dame); S.M. in Bios., S.D. in Bios. (Harvard 
University), Lecturer on Biostatistics; Assistant, 
Staff Member, Forsyth Dental Center. 

Nathan Keyfitz, B.Sc. (McGill University); 
Ph.D. (University of Chicago), Andelot Profes- 
sor of Sociology in the Faculty of Arts and Sci- 
ences and of Demography in the Faculty of 
Public Health (Population Sciences). 

William Monroe Keyserling, B.I.E. (Georgia 
Institute of Technology). S.M.E., S.M., Ph.D. 
(University of Michigan); Assistant Professor 
of Occupational Safety (Environmental Health 
Sciences and Physiology). 

Richard Clark Killin, A.B. (University of Ari- 
zona); LL.B. (University of Michigan), Mem- 
ber of the Faculty of Public Health and Special 
Assistant to the Dean. 

Gerald Lawrence Klerman, A.B. (Cornell Uni- 
versity); M.D. (New York University); A.M. 
(hon.) (Harvard University), Lecturer on 
Epidemiology; Professor of Psychiatry , Harvard 
Medical School. 

Stephen William Lagakos, S.B. (Carnegie- 
Mellon University); M.Phil., Ph.D. (George 
Washington University), Associate Professor 
of Biostatistics; Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. 

Nan Laird, S.B. (University of Georgia); Ph.D. 
(Harvard University), Associate Professor of 
Biostatistics. 

Martin Graham Larson, A.B., S.M., S.D. in 
Bios. (Harvard University), Assistant Professor 
of Biostatistics and Population Sciences; Co- 
Director Biometry Unit, Robert B. Brigham Mul- 
tipurpose Arthritis Center. 

Philip Todd Lavin, A.B. (University of Roches- 
ter); Ph.D. (Brown University), Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Biostatistics; Sidney Farber Cancer In- 
stitute. 

Alexander Leaf, S.B. (University of Washing- 
ton); M.D. (University of Michigan Medical 
School); A.M. (Harvard University), Member 
of the Faculty of Public Health; Ridley Watts 
Professor of Preventive Medicine and Clinical 
Epidemiology , Harvard Medical School. 



Faculty / 129 



David Evan Leith. A.B. (Lehigh University); 
M.D. (Harvard University), Member of the 
Faculty of Public Health {Physiology); Associate 
Professor of Anaesthesia, Harvard Medical 
School. 

David Hugh Leith, S B., S.M. in Ch.E. (Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati); S.D. in Env. H. (Harvard 
University), Associate Professor of Environ- 
mental Health Engineering (Environmental 
Health Sciences). 

C. Robin LeSueur, B. A., B.S.W. (University of 
Toronto); M.L.S. (Columbia University), 
Member of the Faculty of Public Health and the 
Faculty of Medicine; Librarian in the Francis A. 
Countzvay Library of Medicine. 

Richard Levins, A.B. (Cornell University); 
Ph.D. (Columbia University), John Rock Pro- 
fessor of Population Sciences. 

Howard Jules Levy, S.B., S.M., M B A. (Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute), Member of the 
Faculty of Public Health and Associate Dean for 
Finance and Operations. 

Richard Charles Lewontin, A.B. (Harvard 
University); A.M., Ph.D. (Columbia Univer- 
sity), Member of the Faculty of Public Health 

(Population Sciences); Alexander Agassiz Profes- 
sor of Zoology, Harvard University. 

Michael Allen Lieberman, S B. (Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology); Ph.D. (Brandeis Uni- 
versity), Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 
(Nutrition). 

John Bertram Little, A.B. (Harvard Univer- 
sity); M.D. (Boston University), Professor of 
Radiobiology (Physiology) and Director of the 
Kresge Center for Environmental Health. 

Stephen Hathaway Loring, A.B. (Amherst Col- 
lege); B.M.S. (Dartmouth Medical School), 
M.D. (Harvard University), Assistant Profes- 
sor of Physiology. 

Thomas Arthur Louis, A.B. (Dartmouth Col- 
lege); Ph.D. (Columbia University), Associate 
Professor of Biostatistics. 

Bernard Lown, S.B. (University of Maine); 
M.D. (The Johns Hopkins University), Profes- 
sor of Cardiology in Nutrition. 

Mohamed Sayed el Lozy, M.B.,B.Ch. (Univer- 
sity of Cairo); M.D., Ph.D. (University of 
Alexandria), Assistant Professor of Nutrition. 

John Morrison Maclntyre, S.B., Ph.D. (Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology), Assistant 
Professor of Biostatistics; Sidney Farber Cancer 
Institute. 



Marlene Yvonne MacLeish, B.A. (University 
of Western Ontario), Ed.M., Ed.D. (Harvard 
University), Member of the Faculty of Public 
Health and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs 
and Alumni Relations. 

Brian MacMahon, M.D., D.P.H., Ph.D. (Uni- 
versity of Birmingham, England); S.M. in Hyg. 
(Harvard University), M.D. (hon.) (University 
of Athens), Henry Pickering Walcott Professor 
of Epidemiology. 

George Stephen Masnick, A.B., A.M. (Cornell 
University); Ph.D. (Brown University), Asso- 
ciate Professor of Behavioral Sciences. 

William Edward McAuliffe, A.B. (The Johns 
Hopkins University); A.M. (Washington Uni- 
versity); Ph.D. (The Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity), Associate Professor of Sociology (Behav- 
ioral Sciences). 

Jere Mead, S.B., M.D. (Harvard University), 
Cecil K. and Philip Drinker Professor of Envi- 
ronmental Physiology (Physiology). 

Cyrus Rustam Mehta, B.Tech. (Indian Institute 
of Technology), S.M., Ph.D. (Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology) , Assistant Professor of 
Biostatistics; Sidney Farber Cancer Institute. 

Charles Marie Joseph Mertens de Wilmers, 

M.D., Lie. en Psych. (Catholic University of 
Louvain, Belgium), Visiting Professor of Psy- 
chiatry (Behavioral Sciences); Professor of Medi- 
cal Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic 
University of Louvain. 

Edward Harlan Michelson, S B., S.M. (Univer- 
sity of Florida); Ph.D. (Harvard University), 
Associate Professor of Tropical Public Health. 

Olli Sakari Miettinen, M.D. (University of 
Helsinki); , M.P.H., M.Sc, Ph.D. (University 
of Minnesota), Professor of Epidemiology and 
Biostatistics. 

Dade William Moeller, S B., S.M. (Georgia In- 
stitute of Technology); Ph.D. (North Carolina 
State College), Professor of Engineering in 
Environmental Health (Environmental Health 
Sciences) and Director of the Office of Continu- 
ing Education. 

Richard Redding Monson, S B. (North Dakota 
State University); M.D., S.M. in Hyg., S.D. in 
Hyg. (Harvard University), Professor of 
Epidemiology and Director of Admissions. 

Jose Obdulio Mora, M.D. (National University 
of Columbia); S.M. in Nutr. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Assistant Professor of Nutrition. 



Alan Sydney Morrison, A.B. (Harvard Univer- 
sity); M.D. (Tufts University); S.M. in Hyg., 
S.D. in Epid. (Harvard University), Associate 
Professor of Epidemiology. 

C. Frederick Mosteller, S B., S.M. (Carnegie 
Institute of Technology); A.M. , Ph.D. (Prince- 
ton University), S.D. (hon.) (University of 
Chicago); S.D. (hon.) (Carnegie-Mellon Uni- 
versity), S.S.D. (hon.) (Yale University), Roger 
Irving Lee Professor of Mathematical Statistics 
(Health Policy and Management and Biostatis- 
tics); Professor of Mathematical Statistics in the 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Member of the Fac- 
ulty of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. 

James Ivan Mullins, A.B. (University of South 
Florida); Ph.D. (University of Minnesota), As- 
sistant Professor of Virology (Microbiology). 

Raymond Leo Harrington Murphy, Jr., S.B. 
(College of the Holy Cross); M.D. (New York 
University); M.P.H., S.D. in Hyg. (Harvard 
University), Lecturer on Occupational Med- 
icine (Physiology); Director, Pulmonary Service, 
Faulkner Hospital. 

Roger Loyd Nichols, A.B. (Cornell College); 
M.D. (University of Iowa); A.M. (hon.) (Har- 
vard University), Professor of International 
Health (Population Sciences); Director of the Bos- 
ton Museum of Science. 

Peter Ofner, B.Sc. (University of London), 
A.R.I.C. (Associate of Royal Institute of Chem- 
istry of Great Britain and Northern Ireland), 
Ph.D. (University of London), Lecturer on Tox- 
icology (Physiology); Director, Steroid Biochem- 
istry Laboratory , Shattuck Hospital. 

Ann Rosenthal Oliver, A.B. (Smith College); 
Ed.M. (Harvard University); M.P.H. (Univer- 
sity of Hawaii), Member of the Faculty of Pub- 
lic Health and Assistant Dean for Academic 
Administration. 

Albert Joseph Owen, III, S.B. (University of 
Rhode Island); Ph.D. (Harvard University), 
Assistant Professor of Biochemistry (Nutrition). 

Marcello Pagano, B.Sc. (University of Cape 
Town); S.M. (University of Florida); Ph.D. 
(The Johns Hopkins University), Associate 
Professor of Biostatistics and Acting Director of 
the Health Sciences Computing Facility; Sidney 
Farber Cancer Institute. 

Ruth Heather Palmer, B.A., M.D. (Cambridge 
University, England); S.M. in H.S.Ad. (Har- 
vard University), Assistant Professor of Health 
Services (Health Policy and Management). 



130 Officers of Instruction 



Steve Chia-Tung Pan, B.S. (Tokyo Jikeikai 
Premedical College); M.D. (Tokyo Jikeikai 
Medical College); M.P.H. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Professor of Tropical Public Health. 

Willy Frans Piessens, B.S. (College te en van 
Melle, Belgium); M.D. (Free University of 
Brussels), Member of the Faculty of Public 
Health; (Tropical Public Health); Associate Pro- 
fessor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. 

Robert Copeland Repetto, A.B. (Harvard Uni- 
versity); M.Sc. (London School of Economics); 
Ph.D. (Harvard University), Associate Profes- 
sor of Economics and Population (Population 
Sciences and Health Policy and Management). 

Richard Jennings Reynolds, A.B. (University 
of California); Ph.D. (University of Tennes- 
see), Assistant Professor of Radiobiology 
(Physiology). 

Robert Hafling Rice, S.B. (Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology), Ph.D. (University of Cali- 
fornia), Assistant Professor of Toxicology 
(Physiology). 

U. Ingrid Richardson, S.B. (Cornell Univer- 
sity); Ph.D. (Stanford University), Assistant 
Professor of Toxicology (Physiology); Assistant 
Professor of Pharmacology , Harvard Medical 
School. 

Marc Jeffrey Roberts, A.B., Ph.D. (Harvard 
University), Professor of Political Economy 
(Health Policy and Management). 

Barbara Cutmann Rosenkrantz, A.B. (Rad- 
cliffe College); Ph.D. (Clark University), Pro- 
fessor of the History of Science in the Faculty 
of Arts and Sciences and the Faculty of Public 
Health (Health Policy and Management). 
Kenneth Jay Rothman A.B. (Colgate Univer- 
sity); D.M.D., M.P.H. , Dr.P.H. (Harvard Uni- 
versity), Associate Professor of Epidemiology. 

Hilton Aaron Salhanick, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
(Harvard University); M.D. (University of 
Utah), Frederick Lee Hisaw Professor of Re- 
productive Physiology (Population Sciences); 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harvard 
Medical School. 

David Alan Schoenfeld, A.B. (Reed College); 
A.M., Ph.D. (University of Oregon), Associate 
Professor of Biostatistics; Sidney Farber Cancer 
Institute. 

Agnes Schonbrunn, S.B. (McGill University); 
Ph.D. (Brandeis University), Assistant Profes- 
sor of Toxicology (Physiology). 



Ascher Jasha Segall, M.D. (University of 
Lausanne, Switzerland); M.P.H., Dr.P.H. 
(Harvard University), Lecturer on Health Serv- 
ices (Health Policy and Management); Professor 
of Epidemiology , School of Medicine, Boston Uni- 
versity; Professor of Education, School of Educa- 
tion, Boston University. 

Jacob Shapiro, S.B. (City College of New York); 
S.M. (Brown University); Ph.D. (University of 
Rochester), Lecturer on Biophysics in 
Environmental Health (Environmental Health 
Sciences); Radiation Protection Officer and 
Health Physicist, University Health Services. 

Alan Sheldon, B.A., M B., B. Chir., M.A. 
(Cambridge University), D.P.M. (Royal Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons), S.M. in Hyg. 
(Harvard University), Lecturer on Behavioral 
Sciences (Health Policy and Management). 

Donald Sloane Shepard, A.B., M P. P., Ph.D. 
(Harvard University), Associate Professor of 
Operations Management and Operations Re- 
search (Health Policy and Management); 
Economist, Veterans' Administration Outpatient 
Clinic. 

Herbert Sherman, B E E. (College of the City of 
New York); M.E.E., D.E.E. (Polytechnic Insti- 
tute of Brooklyn), Lecturer on Health Services 
Administration (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment) and Associate Director for Technology in 
the Center for the Analysis of Health Practices. 

Thomas Jay Smith, A.B., M.P.H., S.M., Ph.D. 
(University of Minnesota), Associate Professor 
of Industrial Hygiene (Environmental Health 
Sciences and Physiology). 

Stover Hoffman Snook, A.B. (Hartwick Col- 
lege); A.M. (Fordham University); Ph.D. (Tufts 
University), Lecturer on Ergonomics (Physiol- 
ogy); Project Director, Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Company. 

Sergei Pitirimovitch Sorokin, A.B., M.D. 
(Harvard University), Associate Professor of 
Cell Biology (Physiology). 

Frank Irwin Speizer, A.B., M.D. (Stanford 
University), Associate Professor of Epidemio- 
logy (Physiology); Associate Professor of Med- 
icine, Harvard Medical School. 

John Daniel Spengler, S.B. (University of 
Notre Dame); Ph.D. (State University of New 
York at Albany); S.M. in Env. H. (Harvard 
University), Associate Professor of Environ- 
mental Health. 



Andrew Spielman, S.B. (Colorado College); 
S.D. (The Johns Hopkins University), Profes- 
sor of Tropical Public Health. 

Kenneth Earl Stanley, A.B. (Alfred Univer- 
sity); A.M. (Bucknell University); Ph.D. (Uni- 
versity of Florida), Assistant Professor of Bio- 
statistics; Sidney Farber Cancer Institute (on 
leave 1982-83). 

William Boaz Stason, S.B. (University of 
Michigan); M.D., S.M. in Epid. (Harvard Uni- 
versity), Associate Professor of Health Services 
Administration (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Armen Haig Tashjian, Jr., M.D. (Harvard Uni- 
versity), Professor of Toxicology (Physiology); 
Professor of Pharmacology , Harvard Medical 
School. 

Shirley Warnock Thenen, A.B., Ph.D. (Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley), Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nutrition. 

Harold Allen Thomas, Jr., S.B. (Carnegie Insti- 
tute of Technology); S.M., S.D. (Harvard Uni- 
versity), Gordon McKay Professor of Civil and 
Sanitary Engineering. 

Stephen Richard Thomas, A.B. (Oberlin Col- 
lege); A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard University), As- 
sistant Professor of Political Science and 
Environmental Policy (Health Policy and Man- 
agement). 

Mark Smith Thompson, A.B., M P. P., Ph.D. 
(Harvard University), Associate Professor of 
Health Services Administration (Health Policy 
and Management); Associate in the Center for 
the Analysis of Health Practices. 

William Augustine Toscano, S.B., S.M. (In- 
diana University); Ph.D. (University of Il- 
linois), Assistant Professor of Toxicology 
(Physiology). 

David Lynn Tritchler, A.B., S.M. (University 
of Nebraska); S.M. (State University of New 
York at Buffalo); S.D. in Bios. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Assistant Professor of Biostatistics; Sid- 
ney Farber Cancer Institute. 

Anastasios Athanasios Tsiatis, S.B. (Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology); Ph.D. (Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley), Associate 
Professor of Biostatistics; Sidney Farber Cancer 
Institute. 

Isabelle Valadian, M.D. (Faculte Francaise de 
Medicine, Beirut, Lebanon); M.P.H. (Harvard 
University), Professor of Maternal and Child 
Health (Maternal and Child Health and Aging). 



Faculty / 131 



Peter Alexander Yalberg, A.B. (Taylor Univer- 
sity); A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard University), Assis- 
tant Professor of Physiology. 

Richard Leonard Verrier, A.B. (University of 
New Hampshire); Ph.D. (University of Vir- 
ginia), Assistant Professor of Physiology (Nu- 
trition); Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard 
Medical School. 

Warren Ernest Clyde Wacker, M.D. (George 
Washington University); A.M. (hon.) (Harvard 
University), Henry K. Oliver Professor of 
Hygiene; Director of University Health Services. 

Alexander Muir Walker, A.B., M.P.H., M.D., 
Dr. P.H. (Harvard University), Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Epidemiology. 

Deborah Klein Walker, A.B. (Mt. Holyoke Col- 
lege); Ed.M., Ed.D. (Harvard University), As- 
sistant Professor of Human Development in 
the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of 
Public Health {Behavioral Sciences and Maternal 
and Child Health and Aging). 

James Hutchinson Ware, A.B. (Yale Univer- 
sity), Ph.D. (Stanford University), Associate 
Professor of Biostatistics. 

Edward William Webster, B.Sc, Ph.D. (Uni- 
versity of London), Lecturer on Medical Radia- 
tion Physics (Environmental Health Sciences); 
Professor of Radiology (Physics), Harvard Medi- 
cal School. 

Henry Wechsler, A.B. (Washington and Jeffer- 
son College); A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Lecturer on Social Psychology (Behavioral 
Sciences); Research Director, The Medical Foun- 
dation, Inc. 

David Howe Wegman, A.B. (Swarthmore Col- 
lege); M.D., S.M. in Phys. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Associate Professor of Occupational 
Health (Physiology). 

Milton Charles Weinstein, A.B., A.M., 
M.P.P., Ph.D. (Harvard University), Professor 
of Policy and Decision Sciences (B/osfaf/sfics). 

Thomas Huckle Weller, A.B , S.M. (University 
of Michigan); M.D. (Harvard University); 
LL.D. (University of Michigan), Richard Pear- 
son Strong Professor of Tropical Public Health. 

Walter Churchill Willett, M.D. (University of 
Michigan), M.P.H., Dr.P.H. (Harvard Univer- 
sity), Assistant Professor of Epidemiology. 



John Wesley Williamson, A.B., M.D. (Univer- 
sity of California at Berkeley); Visiting Profes- 
sor of International Health (Biostatistics); Pro- 
fessor of International Health, The Johns Hopkins 
University School of Hygiene and Public Health. 

Dyann Fergus Wirth, A.B. (University of Wis- 
consin at Madison); Ph.D. (Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology), Assistant Professor of 
Tropical Public Health. 

Jelia Cox Witschi, S B. (West Virginia Univer- 
sity); S.M. (Case Western University), Assis- 
tant Professor of Nutrition. 

John Benjamin Wyon, B.A., M.B.,B.Ch. 
(Cambridge University); M.P.H. (Harvard 
University), Senior Lecturer on Population 
Studies. 

Joseph Anthony Yacovone, A.B. (Brown Uni- 
versity); D.M.D. (Tufts University); M.P.H. 
(Harvard University), Lecturer on Dental Pub- 
lic Health (Health Policy and Management); 
Chief, Division of Dental Health, Rhode Island 
Department of Health. 

Alonzo Smythe Yerby, S.B. (University of 
Chicago); M.D. (Meharry Medical College); 
M.P.H. (Harvard University), Professor of 
Health Services Administration (Health Policy 
and Management and Maternal and Child Health 
and Aging). 

David William Young, A.B. (Occidental Col- 
lege); A.M. (University of California); D.B.A. 
(Harvard University), Associate Professor of 
Management (Health Policy and Management). 

Marvin Zelen, S.B. (City College of New York); 
A.M. (University of North Carolina); Ph.D. 
(American University), Professor of Statistical 
Science (Biostatistics); Member of the Faculty of 
Arts and Sciences; Director of Statistics Unit, Sid- 
ney Farber Cancer Institute. 



The Teaching Staff 

Walter Pierce Allen, M B. A., Visiting Lecturer 
on Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Kenneth Alfred Arndt, M.D., Lecturer on Oc- 
cupational Dermatology (Physiology). 

Kay Walker Bander, S.M. in H.S. Ad., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Services Administration 

(Health Policy and Management). 

Lester Carl Bartholow, S.D. in Nutr., Visiting 
Lecturer on Nutrition. 

Arthur Angelo Berarducci, M.P.H., Lecturer 
on Health Services Administration (Health Pol- 
icy and Management). 

Warren Lee Berggren, M.D., Dr.P.H., Visiting 
Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 

Donald Mark Berwick, M.D , M P. P., Lecturer 
on Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Laurence Herbert Bishoff, S B., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Kenneth Dale Bloem, S.M. in H.P.&M., Visit- 
ing Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy 
and Management). 

David Blumenthal, M.D., M.P.P., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 

John Dunning Boice, Jr., S.D. in Epid., Visit- 
ing Lecturer on Epidemiology. 

Thomas John Bossert, Ph.D. , Visiting Lecturer 
on International Health (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Thomas Ball Bracken, LL.B., Visiting Lecturer 
on Community Air Pollution (Environmental 
Health Sciences). 

Stanley Gene Burchfield, M B. A., M.P.H., 
Visiting Lecturer on Health Services (Health 
Policy and Management). 

Sheldon Daniel Bycoff, M B. A., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management) . 

Debra Lynn Caplan, M.P. A., Visiting Lecturer 
on Health Policy and Management. 
Lincoln Chih-ho Chen, M.D., M.P.H., Visit- 
ing Lecturer on Population Sciences. 

Shepard Nathan Cohen, M P. A., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 



132 / Officers of Instruction 



Philip Timothy Cole. M.D.. Dr.P.H., Visiting 

Lecturer on Epidemiology. 

Susan Mary Cotter D.V.M., Visiting Lecturer 

on Cancer Biology (Microbiology). 

Kathleen Ridder Crampton M.P.H., \'isiting 

Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy and 

Management). 

John Eustace Cupples. M Th . Visiting Lec- 
turer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Gustave John Dammin. M.D., Lecturer on 
Tropical Public Health. 

Maureen Chambers DeFuria, S.M. in 
H.P.&M., Visiting Lecturer on Health Policy 
and Management. 

Rita Dickinson De Lollis M.D.. M.P.H., Lec- 
turer on Maternal and Child Health (Maternal 
and Child Health and Aging). 

Paul Maximillian Densen. D.Sc, M.A. (hon.), 
Lecturer on Preventive and Social Medicine 
(Health Policy and Management). 

Chester William Douglass, D.D.S., M.P.H., 
Ph.D., Lecturer on Public Health Dentistry 
(Health Policy and Management). 

Janet Berube Douglass. S.M., Lecturer on Oc- 
cupational Health Nursing (Physiology). 

David Dressier, Ph.D., Lecturer on Mi- 
crobiology. 

Karin Amtz Dumbaugh. A.M., S.M. in H.S.- 
Ad., S.D., Lecturer on Health Services (Health 
Policy and Management). 

Bruce Anthony Egan, S.M. in M.E., S.D. in 
Env.H., Visiting Lecturer on Air Pollution 
Meteorology (Environmental Health Sciences). 

Manning Feinleib, M.D.. Dr.P.H., Visiting 
Lecturer on Epidemiology. 

Robert George Feldman, M.D., Lecturer on 
Neurology (Physiology). 

Neville Rex Edwards Fendall, M.D., D.P.H., 
Visiting Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 

Mary Jane Ferraro, Ph.D., M.P.H., Instructor 
in Microbiology. 

Mark George Field, Ph.D., Lecturer on Health 
Services Administration (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Lorenz John Finison, Ph.D., Lecturer on Bio- 
statistics. 

William David Finkle, Ph.D., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Epidemiology. 



Nicholas John Fiumara. M.D., M.P.H., Visit- 
ing Lecturer on Infectious Diseases (Mi- 
crobiology). 

William Herbert Foege, M.D., M.P.H., Visit- 
ing Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 

Frances Gail Forster S.M. in Env.H., Visiting 
Lecturer on Industrial Hygiene (Environmental 
Health Sciences). 

Stanley Norton Gershoff. Ph.D., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Nutrition. 

Robert Frederick Gilfillan. Ph.D.. Visiting 
Lecturer on Applied Microbiology. 
Edwin Martin Gold M D Visiting Lecturer 
on Maternal and Child Health (Maternal and 
Child Health and Aging). 

George Francis Grady M.D., Visiting Lecturer 
on Applied Microbiology. 

William Frank Greenlee Ph.D., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Toxicology (Physiology). 

Rodrigo Guerrero. M.D., S.M. in Hyg.. 
Dr.P.H., Visiting Lecturer on Population Sci- 
ences. 

Christine Lee Hobart, D B A., Lecturer on 
Labor Relations (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Diane Elizabeth Hoffman S.M. in H.P.&M., 
Visiting Lecturer on Health Policy and Man- 
agement. 

Frank Macmillan Holden. M.D. , Visiting Lec- 
turer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Marcel Hommel, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer on 
Tropical Public Health. 

Donald Roswell Hopkins. M.D., M.P.H., Vis- 
iting Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 

Anthony Paul Hourihan M B. A. , Instructor in 

Finance (Health Policy and Management). 

Agnes Mayer Huber. Ph.D., Lecturer on Nutri- 
tion. 

Eleanor May Irish. M.P.H., Visiting Lecturer 
on Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Rudolph John Jaeger, Ph.D. . Visiting Lecturer 
on Occupational and Environmental Toxicol- 
ogy (Environmental Health Sciences). 

Hersheljick, M.D., Lecturer on Epidemiology. 

G. Timothy Johnson, M.D., M.P.H., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 



Robert Lincoln Kaiser, M.D., D.T.M.&H., Vis- 
iting Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 

Anne Brown Keith. S.M. in H.S.A., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Anthony Leader Komaroff, M.D., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Serv ices (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Jeffrey Powell Koplan, M.D. . M.P.H., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Philip John Landrigan. M.D., M.Sc, Visiting 
Lecturer on Occupational Health (Physiology). 

Marc Kamis Landy, Ph.D., Lecturer on Politi- 
cal Science (Health Policy and Management). 

Patricia Ann Lane, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer on 
Population Sciences. 

Sol Levine, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer on Behav- 
ioral Sciences. 

Chwen-Ching Lee, S.M. in H.P.&M., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Policy (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Barry Steven Levy, M.D., M.P.H., Lecturer on 
Occupational Health (Physiology). 

Frederick Pei Li, M.D., Lecturer on Epidemiol- 
ogy- 
Matthew Heng Liang M.D. M.P.H., Lecturer 
on Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Stephen Lorch. S.B., Lecturer on Health Serv- 
ices Administration (Health Policy and Man- 
agement). 

James Richard Mahoney Ph.D.. Visiting Lec- 
turer on Applied Meteorology (Environmental 
Health Sciences). 

Wendy Kathleen Mariner, J.D., M.P.H., In- 
structor in Health Law (Health Policy and Man- 
agement). 

Harry Milton Marks, A.M., Instructor in 
Health Policy (Health Policy and Management). 

Robert John Marra M.B.A., Visiting Lecturer 
on Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Leonardo Jimenez Mata S.D. in Hyg , Visiting 
Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 
Edward Noel Mcintosh, M.D., S.D. in Popl., 
Visiting Lecturer on Population Sciences. 

Robert Warwick Miller, M.D., Dr.P.H., Visit- 
ing Lecturer on Epidemiology. 



Teaching Staff 133 



Farrokh Ziaollah Modabber, Ph.D., Visiting 
Lecturer on Microbiology. 
Edward J. Montminy, M.P.A., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Health Services Administration 

(Health Policy and Management). 
Robert Morris, D.S.W., Visiting Lecturer on 
Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Richard Harold Morrow, M.D., M.P.H., Vis- 
iting Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 
Samuel Leonard Moschella, M.D., Visiting 
Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 

Harry Most, M.D., D.T.M.&H., D.M.S., Visit- 
ing Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 

Kenneth Eugene Mott, M.D., M.P.H., Visiting 
Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 
William Boss Munier, M.D., M.B.A., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Services Administration 

(Health Policy and Management). 

Kenneth William Nelson, S.M., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Environmental Health. 
H. Richard Nesson, M.D., Lecturer on Health 
Services (Health Policy and Management). 
Franklin Allen Neva, M.D., Visiting Lecturer 
on Tropical Public Health. 
Eli Herbert Newberger, M.D., S.M. in Epid., 
Lecturer on Child Health (Maternal and Child 
Health and Aging). 

Robert James Nicolosi, Ph.D., Lectureron Nu- 
trition. 

L. Christine Oliver, M.D., M.P.H., S.M in 
Phys., Visiting Lecturer on Occupational 
Medicine (Physiology). 

Ralph Seal Paffenbarger, Jr., M.D., Dr.P.H., 
Visiting Lecturer on Epidemiology. 
Hugh Llewellyn Popenoe, Ph.D., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Tropical Public Health. 
Thomas Oakley Pyle, M.B.A., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Mitchell Thornton Rabkin, M.D., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Mark Lewis Rosenberg, M.D., M P. P., Visit- 
ing Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy 
and Management). 

Jacqueline Miller Rosenthal, M.P.H., Visiting 
Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 



Harvey Rubin, Ph.D., M.D., Instructor in 
Tropical Public Health. 

Richard Martin Ryan, S.D. in Hyg., Lecturer 
on Health Services (Maternal and Child Health 
and Aging). 

Kenneth Wayne Samonds, Ph.D., Visiting 
Lecturer on Nutrition. 

Elizabeth Woodland Sands, J.D., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Health Services (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Philip Earl Sartwell, M.D., M.P.H., Visiting 
Lecturer on Epidemiology. 

Nevin Stewart Scrimshaw, Ph.D., M.D., 
M.P.H., Visiting Lecturer on Tropical Public 
Health. 

Jack M. Selby, S.B. , Visiting Lecturer on Radi- 
ation Protection (Environmental Health Sci- 
ences). 

David Judson Sencer, M.D., M.P.H., Visiting 
Lecturer on Tropical Public Health. 

Stuart Howard Shapiro, M.D., M.P.H., Visit- 
ing Lecturer on Health Services (Health Policy 
and Management). 

Allen Howard Storm, M.D., M.P.H., Lecturer 
on Occupational Health (Physiology). 
Phillip George Stubblefield, M.D., Visiting 
Lecturer on Maternal Health (Maternal and 
Child Health and Aging). 

James Oliver Taylor, M.D., Visiting Lecturer 
on Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Eoin William Trevelyan, D B A., Lecturer on 

Management (Health Policy and Management). 
Michael Oliver Varner, S.M. in Hyg., Visiting 
Lecturer on Industrial Hygiene (Environmental 

Health Sciences). 

Franz Cornelius von Lichtenberg, M.D., Lec- 
turer on Tropical Public Health. 
Julia Ann Walsh, M.D., Visiting Lecturer on 
Infectious Disease Epidemiology (Mi- 
crobiology). 

Christine Waternaux, Ph.D., Lecturer on 
Biostatistics. 

Carl Norman Wathne, S.M., Visiting Lecturer 
on Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Peter Fahey Weller, M.D., Visiting Lectureron 
Tropical Public Health. 

Barbara Graham Werner, Ph.D., Visiting Lec- 
turer on Microbiology. 



Jay Andrew Winsten, Ph.D., Lecturer on 
Health Services (Health Policy and Manage- 
ment). 

Michele Sandra Winsten, S.M. in H.P.&M , 
Visiting Lecturer on Health Policy and Man- 
agement. 

George Green Wright, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer 
on Applied Microbiology. 



134 / Officers of Instruction 



The Research Staff 

Lynne Margaret Ausman, S.D, in Nutr., Re- 
search Associate in Nutrition. 
Jose Azocax, M.D., S.D. in Micr. , Research As- 
sociate in Microbiology. 

Barbara Doris Beck. Ph.D. . Research Associate 
in Physiology . 

Sarah Lowe Benet Ed.D.. Research Associate 
in Maternal and Child Health and Aging. 

Dorothy Bruno. S.B., Assistant in Nutrition (to 
1231 82). 

Ruth Margaret Butler S.M. Research Associ- 
ate in Social Work (Maternal and Child Health 
and Aging). 

Robert Lee Cannon, III, Consultant on Bioen- 
gineering (Nutrition). 

Shu-heh Wang Chu, Ph.D., Research Associ- 
ate in Nutrition. 

Mary Antoinette VValz Ciconni. Ph.D., Re- 
search Associate in Tropical Public Health. 

Douglas William Dockeiy, S.D. in Env. H., 
Research Associate in Environmental Health. 
John Joseph Eckenrode. Ph.D. . Research Asso- 
ciate and Lecturer on Psychology (Behavioral 
Sciences). 

John Stephen Evans, S.D. in Env.H., Research 
Associate in Environmental Health Sciences. 

Anna Gotsis Gallagher, Assistant in Nutrition 
(to 123182). 

Daniel Lino Gallina M.D. . Research Associate 
in Nutrition. 

Richard Bradley Gamble. A.M., Consultant on 
Population Problems (Population Sciences). 

S. Katherine Gilbert, Ph.D., S.M. in Env.H.. 
Research Associate in Industrial Hygiene 
(Environmental Health Sciences). 

Kenneth Francis Girard Ph.D., Research As- 
sociate in Microbiology. 

Jack Mark Goldstein, Ph.D., Consultant on In- 
strumentation (Population Sciences). 

Thomas Barr Graboys, M.D., Research Associ- 
ate in Cardiology (Nutrition). 

Judith Ryan Gunsalus, Ph.D.. Research Asso- 
ciate in Toxicology (Physiology). 

Patricia Henson, Ph.D.. Research Associate in 
Radiobiology (Physiology). 

Hugh Robert Holtrop, M.D., Research Associ- 
ate and Lecturer on Population Studies. 



Frederic Gallatin Hoppin, Jr., M.D., Research 
Associate in Physiology. 

Chang-I Hua. Ph.D., Research Associate in 
Population Studies. 

William Russell Kimball. Ph.D.. M.D., Re- 
search Associate in Physiology. 

Richard Errol Letz, Ph.D., Research Associate 
in Physiology. 

Charles Levenstein, Ph.D., M.O.H., Research 
Associate in Occupational Health (Physiology). 

Jonathan Louis Logan, Ph.D., Research Asso- 
ciate and Lecturer on Microbiology. 
Sheila Dawn Long. Ph.D., Research Associate 
in Radiobiology (Physiology). 
Robert Denis Lynch. S.D. in Nutr.. Research 
Associate in Nutrition. 

Robert Burnett McGandy M.D., M.P.H., 
Consultant on Pathology (Nutrition and Physi- 
ology). 

Stephan Sherman Miller, Ph.D. , Research As- 
sociate in Microbiology. 

Robert Woodward Morgan, Jr., Ph.D., Re- 
search Associate in Population Sciences. 

Gerald Murray, Ph.D., Research Associate in 
Population Studies. 

Hatsumi Nagasawa Ph.D., Research Associate 
in Radiobiology (Physiology). 

Mario Angelo Orlandi, Ph.D., M.P.H., Re- 
search Associate in Behavioral Sciences. 

Randall M. Packard, Ph.D., Research Associ- 
ate in Microbiology. 

Ralph J. Parod. Ph.D., Research Associate in 
Physiology. 

Joseph Piesman, S.D. inTr.P.H., Research As- 
sociate in Tropical Public Health. 

Philip Jack Podrid. M.D., Research Associate 
in Cardiology (Nutrition). 

David John Policansky. Ph.D., Research As- 
sociate in Marine Ecosystems (Population Sci- 
ences). 

Charles J. Puccia, Ph.D.. Research Associate 
in Marine Ecology and Complex Systems 
(Population Sciences). 

Philippe Albert Rossignol. Ph.D., Research 
Associate in Tropical Public Health. 

Stephen Norman Rudnick S.D. in Env.H., Re- 
search Associate in Environmental Health 
Engineering (Environmental Health Sciences). 



Peter Barry Ryan, Ph.D., Research Associate in 
Air Pollution (Environmental Health Sciences). 

Richard Benson Saltman, Ph.D. . Research As- 
sociate in Political Science (Health Policy and 
Management). 

Sonja Sandberg. Ph.D., Research Associate in 
Clinical Decision Analysis (Center for the Anal- 
ysis of Health Practices). 

Daniel Henry Seeley. Ph.D., Research Associ- 
ate and Lecturer on Biochemistry (Population 
Sciences). 

Sharma Sheela, Ph.D., Research Associate in 
Radiobiology (Physiology). 

Ann Helene Sliski, S.D. in Micr., Research 
Associate in Microbiology- 
Jeffrey Coleman Smith, Ph.D. , Research Asso- 
ciate in Physiology. 

Steven Leslie Sneddon, S.D. in Phys., Re- 
search Associate in Physiology. 

Charles McAfee Super, Ph.D., Research Asso- 
ciate in Psychology (Nutrition) . 

Theresa Dorothy Sweeney, Ph.D., Research 
Associate in Physiology. 

Clayton Lay Thomas, M.D., M.P.H., Consul- 
tant on Human Reproduction (Population Sci- 
ences). 

Charles William Todd. Ph.D., Research Asso- 
ciate in Tropical Public Health. 

Helene Vetrovs, Assistant in Radiobiology 

(Physiology). 

Edward Francis Voelkel Research Associate in 
Toxicology (Physiology). 

Susan Kemp Wheeldon, A.M., Assistant in 
Tropical Public Health. 

Carmen Alonso Whipple, Ph.D., Research As- 
sociate and Lecturer on Population Studies 

(Population Sciences). 

Jack Mikhail Wolf son, Ph.D., Research Asso- 
ciate in Environmental Health Sciences. 
Stella Bemadette Yen, M.D., M.P.H., Research 
Associate in Epidemiology. 



Research Staff 135 



Professors Emeriti 



Donald Leslie Augustine, S.B., S.D. (hon.), 
A.M. (hon ). Professor of Tropical Public 
Health, Emeritus (1961). 

Paul Maximillian Densen. A.B., S.D., A.M. 
(hon.), Professor of Community Health, 
Emeritus (1980). 

Dana Lyda Farnsworth, A.B., S B., M.D., S.D. 
(hon ), Henry K. Oliver Professor of Hygiene, 
Emeritus (1971). 

John Everett Gordon, S B , Ph.D., M.D., A.M. 
(hon.), F.R.C.P. (Lond.), Professor of Preven- 
tive Medicine and Epidemiology, Emeritus 
(1958). 

Roy Orval Greep, S B., S.M., Ph.D., A.M. 
(hon.), S.D. (hon.), John Rock Professor of 
Population Studies, Emeritus (1974). 

David Mark Hegsted, S.B., S.M., Ph.D., A.M. 
(hon ), Professor of Nutrition, Emeritus (1980). 

Alexander Hamilton Leighton, A.B., A.M., 
M.D., A.M. (hon.), Professor of Social Psychia- 
try, Emeritus (1975). 

Robert Balentine Reed, A.B., A.M. (hon.), Pro- 
fessor of Biostatistics, Emeritus (1982). 

Roger Randall Dougan Revelle, A.B., Ph.D., 
S.D. (hon.), L.H.D., Richard SaltonstaU Profes- 
sor of Population Policy, Emeritus (1978). 

Elizabeth Prince Rice, A.B., S.M., Associate 
Professor of Public Health Social Work, 
Emerita (1967). 

William Morris Schmidt, S B., M.D., A.M. 
(hon.), Professor of Maternal and Child Health, 
Emeritus (1973). 

John Crayton Snyder, A.B., M.D., LL.D., Pro- 
fessor of Population and Public Health, Emeri- 
tus (1976). 

Fredrick John Stare, S B., S.M., Ph.D., M.D., 
A.M. (hon.), S.D. (hon.), D.Sc. (hon.), Profes- 
sor of Nutrition, Emeritus (1980). 

James Laverre Whittenberger, S.B., M.D., 
A.M. (hon.), James Stevens Simmons Professor 
of Public Health; Professor of Physiology, 
Emeritus (1982). 

Jane Worcester, A.B., Dr.P.H., S.D. (hon.), 
Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, 
Emerita (1977). 



OFFICIAL REGISTER OF 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY (ISSN0199-1787) 

Admissions Office 
Harvard School of Public Health 
677 Huntington Avenue 
Boston, Massachusetts 02115